Religious/Spiritual

2021 Jun 19

In the Groves

5:30pm to 7:30pm

Location: 

Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston

Immerse yourself in the deep beauty of trees in this story and music journey through the Arboretum. Led by Oracle award-winning storyteller Diane Edgecomb and Celtic harper Margot Chamberlain, this unfolding performance of ancient tales and songs from cultures around the world takes place in a variety of groves—birch, cherry, and evergreen—at some of the Arboretum’s loveliest spots.

This event is free, but registration is required and limited. Not designed for children under 12, and dogs are not allowed. COVID guidelines will be followed.

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2021 May 06

Book Talk: Faith in Numbers: Religion, Sectarianism, and Democracy

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

A seminar with Michael Hoffman, assistant professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, on his new book Faith in Numbers: Religion, Sectarianism, and Democracy from Oxford University Press.

Why does religion sometimes increase support for democracy and sometimes do just the opposite? Faith in Numbers presents a theory of religion, group interest, and democracy. Focusing on communal religion, it demonstrates that the effect of communal prayer on support for democracy depends on the interests of the religious group in question. For members of...

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2021 Apr 08

Stories of Women from Jaina Island Maya Figurines

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

Maya female ceramic figurines from the island of Jaina in Campeche, Mexico, produced in the Late Classic Period (600–900 CE) are admired for their lifelike, poignant, and sometimes amusing characteristics. Long assumed to be elite women or moon goddesses, these figurines reveal a complexity of Maya social life, especially for women, that is rarely seen in other painted ceramics or monumental sculpture. They also offer insights into the culture of Jaina Island, including disturbing enslavement practices.

Mary Miller will discuss various interpretations of Jaina figurines—...

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2021 Feb 02

Making Meaning in 2021 at the Crossroads of Business and Capitalism, Ethics, Faith, and Justice

11:00am to 12:00pm

Location: 

Harvard Divinity School—Online

Speakers:

  • John P. Brown, MBA '74, MDiv '88, Practitioner in Residence in Religion, Business Ethics, and the Economic Order, Harvard Divinity School
  • Katherine Collins, MTS '11, Head of Sustainable Investing, Putnam Investments
  • Karim Hutson, MBA '03, MTS '08, Founder & Managing Member, Genesis Companies
  • Al-Husein Madhany, MTS '01, Head of Global People Operations, Moveworks.ai

This event will be recorded. Closed captioning will be provided, and persons with disabilities who wish to request accommodations...

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2021 Feb 01

Psychedelics: The Ancient Religion with No Name?

5:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Harvard Divinity School—Online

The most influential religious historian of the 20th century, Huston Smith, once referred to it as the "best-kept secret" in history. Did the ancient Greeks use drugs to find God? And did the earliest Christians inherit the same secret tradition? A profound knowledge of visionary plants, herbs, and fungi passed from one generation to the next, ever since the Stone Age? Join us for a discussion between CSWR Director Charles Stang and Brian Muraresku about his new book, The Immortality Key: The Secret History of the Religion with No Name, a groundbreaking dive into the role of psychedelics...

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2020 Dec 08

Author Discussion: Black And Buddhist: What Buddhism Can Teach Us about Race, Resilience, Transformation, and Freedom

5:00pm to 6:30pm

Location: 

Online Event

Buddhism is a way of life, a philosophy, a psychology,  a set of ethics, a religion, or a combination thereof. Central to the many ways Buddhism is understood is the achievement of emotional, mental, and psychological wellness. African Americans are at perpetual risk of psychological imbalance and trauma due to the social realities of racism in the United States. The authors engage the question, What can Buddhism offer African Americans who want to be emotionally resilient in a context they cannot...

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2020 Dec 14

Author Discussion with Francis X. Clooney, S.J.: Reading the Hindu and Christian Classics: Why and How Deep Learning Still Matters

5:00pm to 6:30pm

Location: 

Online Event

Please join us as Francis X. Clooney, S.J., HDS Parkman Professor of Divinity and Professor of Comparative Theology, discusses his recent publication, Reading the Hindu and Christian Classics: Why and How Deep Learning Still Matters.

Jon D. Levenson (HDS) and Sarah Coakley (Australian Catholic University) will serve as respondents. 

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

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2020 Nov 12

Women Singing: The Regulation of Solo Female Vocals in Iran’s Hypermediated Public Sphere

3:00pm

Location: 

Harvard Divinity School—Online

Nahid Siamdoust (Yale University), Visiting Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and Anthropology of Religion, will give the lecture, “Women Singing: The Regulation of Solo Female Vocals in Iran’s Hypermediated Public Sphere."

Learn more about and RSVP for Women Singing: The Regulation of Solo Female Vocals in Iran's Hypermediated Public Sphere....

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2020 Oct 12

Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620

Mon Oct 12 (All day) to Sat Oct 31 (All day)

Location: 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

Four hundred years have passed since the Wampanoag Nation encountered English immigrants who settled on the shores of their land at Patuxet—now called Plymouth. Harvard University has had a relationship with the Wampanoag and other local tribal communities for nearly as long, establishing the Harvard Indian College on campus in 1655. In acknowledgment of this early history, the Peabody Museum has asked Wampanoag tribal members to reflect on collections spanning...

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2019 Nov 06

Great Russian Jews: Solomon Mikhoels (1890–1948)

4:30pm to 5:45pm

Location: 

CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

This panel discussion with two leading Jewish cultural historians examines the remarkable contributions and tragic death of the great actor, theater director, playwright, visionary of Yiddish culture, and Jewish activist Solomon (Shloyme) Mikhoels (1890–1948).

Born Shloyme Vovsi in Dvinsk (now Daugavpils, Latvia), the genius actor Mikhoels became the chief director of the State Jewish Theater in Moscow. During World War II, he served as chairman of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee. Mikhoels’ assassination by Stalin’s secret police, although officially billed as an accident,...

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2019 Apr 10

Great Russian Jews: Mikhail Botvinnik

4:30pm to 5:45pm

Location: 

CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

This panel explores the life and legacy of the chess genius Mikhail Botvinnik (1911-1995).

Born in Kuokkala, Grand Duchy of Finland (now Repino, Russian Federation), Botvinnik became Soviet Chess Champion in 1931 and World Chess Champion in 1948. One of the 20th century’s dominant chess players and teachers, Botvinnik trained generations of Soviet chess masters, among them world champions Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov, and Vladimir Kramnik.

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2018 Nov 03

Día de los Muertos Celebración Familiar / Day of the Dead Family Celebration

12:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Live music, Oaxacan wood carving, and festive decorations help to make this a joyful event designed to remember and welcome back the spirits of loved ones. Decorate a sugar skull (additional $6 fee); sip spicy hot chocolate; make papel picado (cut paper banners), cempasúchil flowers and other artwork; and write a message in any language you choose to place upon the Día de los Muertos altar. The community altar art will be created by students at the Rafael Hernández Dual Language School in Boston.

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2018 Nov 01

Día de los Muertos / Day of the Dead Evening Celebration and Museum Open House

4:00pm to 8:00pm

Location: 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Remember and celebrate your departed loved ones at this year’s Día de los Muertos altar, savor traditional Mexican hot chocolate and pan de muerto, and enjoy live music.

Free and open to the public. Reservations required; available online starting October 1.

Related family event on November 3.

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