Events

    2021 Apr 06

    Biopharma R&D During COVID-19: One Year Later

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

    The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic brought new challenges and opportunities to biotech and pharmaceutical companies. Several new vaccines and therapies have already been brought to patients. Companies initiated efforts to catalyze collaborative research, new ways of working and social justice. One year into the pandemic, we will examine the initial lessons for biopharma R&D - what worked, what didn’t, and how can the industry sustain momentum on emerging priorities for the future? Join us for a discussion with three of the industry’s top leaders.

    ...

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    2021 Apr 05

    Native Americans and the National Consciousness: Virtual Reading and Conversation with Joy Harjo

    6:00pm to 7:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Native American Program & the Harvard Art Museums—Online

    The Harvard University Native American Program and the Harvard Art Museums present a reading and conversation with Joy Harjo, the 23rd poet laureate of the United States.

    Harjo is an internationally renowned performer and writer, who is a member of the Mvskoke Nation and belongs to Oce Vpofv (Hickory Ground). The author of nine books of poetry, several plays and children’s books, and a memoir (Crazy Brave), she has received many honors, including the Ruth Lilly Prize for Lifetime Achievement from the Poetry Foundation, the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American...

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    2021 Apr 05

    Small Town Urbanism in the 21st Century

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    This program brings together three unique perspectives on the idea of “Small Town Urbanism”: Andrew Freear, Director of Rural Studio at Auburn University; Faranak Miraftab, Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and Todd Okolichany, Director of Planning and Urban Design for the City of Asheville, North Carolina. 

    Climate change, the pandemic, telecommuting, and accelerating land costs in large cities have fueled a slow but noticeable relocation of people and services to ex-urban locales. The retreat from large cities...

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    2021 Apr 01

    Harvard Dance Center Spring '21 Artist Talk

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Dance Center—Online

    Choreographers and dancers are problem-solvers. They move through crises rather than around them. Join us this spring for community gatherings with Harvard Dance Center’s exceptional teaching artists in a series of artist-led dialogues that explore how artistry, identity, and advocacy take shape in turbulent times. 

    Learn more about and register for this Art Talk.

    2021 Apr 01

    Race, Representation, and Agassiz’s Brazilian Fantasy

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    How do we confront the history and legacy of Louis Agassiz’s extensive archive of images of African and Indigenous Brazilians made in Manaus, Brazil in 1865 and housed at Harvard’s Peabody Museum?

    Four distinguished panelists reflect on the historical moment when these pictures were taken, discuss racist displays of Indigenous people in Brazil and elsewhere, and, by bringing to light respect for different epistemologies, explore ways to contend with them today. Panelists will be writer and historian Christoph Irmscher (contributor to the recent Peabody Museum Press book about...

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    2021 Apr 01

    AI and the Future of Health

    1:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) can enhance scientists’ ability to make discoveries. Across the life sciences, AI algorithms are being developed and deployed to speed our path to better health. This special Radcliffe science event will focus on how AI can accelerate research and development in general and drug discovery in particular. The health AI experts Regina Barzilay and Casandra Mangroo will each speak about their innovative work and then join Radcliffe’s Alyssa Goodman in a conversation on AI’s promise—and potential pitfalls—as we look toward the future of human health.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 31

    Food in Art

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Join the Harvard Art Museums on Zoom for a bite-size look at the role of food in art, presented in partnership with the Food Literacy Project at Harvard University Dining Services.

    From vegetable-based dyes to dairy fixatives, food and art share a long and interesting history. In this talk, curatorial and conservation fellows Ruby Awburn, Lauren Hanson, Leonie Mueller, and Julie Wertz will take us on a culinary tour of the Harvard Art Museums and discuss the varied roles that food has played in art.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 31

    MUTINY: poems

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Phillip B. Williams is the author of the poetry collection “Thief in the Interior.” His artistic interests manifest through lyrical and narrative investigations of the aesthetic possibilities and historical implications of the grotesque and through (re)creation of Afro-diasporic mythologies within contemporary timeframes.

    Join Williams as he discusses researching, writing, and revising poems (title: “Mutiny”) and prose (title: “Threshold”) during his Radcliffe fellowship year. Within both genres, he hopes to research and explore Black folklore, African-diasporic mythologies...

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    2021 Mar 30

    U.S. Policy Towards Latin America Under Biden

    12:00pm to 1:20pm

    Location: 

    David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard—Online

    How will U.S. policy toward Latin America change under the Biden Administration? Will we see a return to Obama era policies, or something new? What are the new administration’s principal priorities and challenges in Latin America? What should they be? Four experts on U.S.-Latin American relations discuss changes and continuities in the post-Trump era.

    Learn more about and register for U.S. Policy...

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    2021 Mar 29

    Health Care Leadership During COVID-19

    12:00pm to 12:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    The COVID-19 pandemic has upended health care delivery and economics. This webinar will provide the behind-the-scenes perspective of a senior hospital leader in a time of crisis. Dr. Kimball will discuss how she and her leadership team adapted to the immediate crisis as well as its prolonged evolution, from establishing a command structure to discovering hidden talents on their team. The session will explore leadership lessons and her insights for the path forward.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 26

    Rural Education in America: What Works for Our Students, Teachers, and Communities

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Rural Education in America provides a comprehensive framework for understanding the diversity and complexity of rural communities in the United States and for helping rural educators implement and evaluate successful place-based programs tailored for students and their families. Written by Geoff and Sky Marietta, educators who grew up in rural America and returned there to raise their children, the book illustrates how efficacy is determined by the degrees to which instruction, interventions, and programs address the needs and strengths of each unique rural community.

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    2021 Mar 25

    Black Is Queen: The Divine Feminine in Kush

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East—Online

    The prominence of powerful goddesses and queens in the Nubian Kingdom of Kush (now Northern Sudan) highlights the unusually high status of women in this ancient African society and serves as a fitting focus for the study of female power in the ancient world. Using temple inscriptions found in Egypt and Nubia, the rich funerary goods found in royal burials, and temple and tomb imagery, Solange Ashby will discuss how ancient Africans of the Nile Valley understood female power and presence. Songs from Beyoncé’s recent production "Black Is King" will be woven into this presentation on...

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    2021 Mar 24

    The Intentional Museum

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    American historian Christy Coleman is the distinguished lecturer for the 2021 Seminar in Innovative Curatorial Practice. Coleman is renowned for creating innovative, engaging, and inclusive museum exhibitions and programs that tell a comprehensive story of American history. In this program she will discuss the power that museums have to genuinely engage with communities around what matters most to them. While expertise within the museums is invaluable, it is wasted if not used to help communities address their issues and aspirations.

    Established in 2014, the Seminar in...

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    2021 Mar 17

    "The Polynesian Problem": Western Studies of Pacific Islander Origins

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    "What is a Polynesian?" This is a question with a long and troubling history embedded in settler colonialism. From Europeans’ earliest encounters with the Pacific, White Europeans expressed a fascination and partial identification with the racial origins of Polynesians. Polynesians seemed to represent "natural man" in the purest state. In nineteenth- and early twentieth-century social-scientific studies, Polynesian origins became the subject of intense scrutiny and debate. Physical anthropologists such as Louis R. Sullivan declared Polynesians to be conditionally Caucasian....

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    2021 Mar 16

    COVID-19 and the Law: The Health Care System in the Age of COVID-19

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    This seminar series will consider the ethical, legal, regulatory, and broader social and institutional impacts that COVID-19 has had, as well as the longer-lasting effects it may have on our society. This fifth seminar in the series will focus on how the health care system has reacted and evolved during the pandemic.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost all aspects of life in the United States and around the world, disrupting the global economy as well as countless institutions. The issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic present a critical juncture for the U.S. and other...

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    2021 Mar 15

    Members: Not on Display! Treasures of the Mineralogical & Geological Museum

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Visitors to the Harvard Museum of Natural History are dazzled by the Mineral Gallery’s beautiful specimens, yet the gallery displays only a fraction of the entire collection.

    While each of the collection’s 300,000+ specimens has great scientific value, a subset also has significant commercial value. Join Curator Raquel Alonso-Perez for a virtual behind the-scenes visit to view specimens that, for security reasons, are not typically on display. You’ll see a rare opal in matrix from Mexico, tourmalines from the first pegmatitic discovery in the U.S., and crystalline gold, among...

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    2021 Mar 15

    Black and White Thinking: A Conversation with Cord Whitaker

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Committee on Medieval Studies—Online

    Author Cord Whitaker discusses his new book "Black Metaphors: How Modern Racism Emerged from Medieval Race-Thinking" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019) with Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 15

    Mind, Heart and Body: The Creative Process of Making Theater From a Director’s Perspective

    4:30pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Mind Brain Behavior Interfaculty Initiative at Harvard—Online

    How does an actor transform into a character? What is the process that allows this transformation to happen? What is the role of the audience in completing the theatrical event? Join Diane Paulus, Professor of the Practice in Theater, Dance & Media and English, for a behind the scenes look at the creative process of making theater.

    Learn more about and register for Mind,...

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    2021 Mar 11

    Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, "The Miasmist: George E. Waring, Jr. and Landscapes of Public Health"

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In 1867, nineteenth-century sanitary engineer George E. Waring, Jr. (1833–1898) published an influential manual entitled “Draining for Profit, Draining for Health,” reflecting the obsessions of his gilded age—wealth, health, and miasma. Even as the germ theory emerged, Waring supported the anti-contagionist miasma theory, positing that disease spread through the air as a poisonous vapor, emerging from damp soil. He applied his knowledge of farm drainage to an urban theory of public health, with a drainage plan for Central Park; a sewerage system for Memphis; a transformation of New York...

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