Events

    2021 Mar 06

    A History of Path-Making at the Arnold Arboretum

    2:00pm

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    At the time of its founding in 1872, the land on which the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University is sighted was a patchwork of farmland and forest. As the Arboretum was planted, pathways were developed to lead people through the picturesque landscape. As the landscape developed, economies shifted, wars took place, and directors changed. Each of these factors subtly influenced shifts in the park’s path system. Join the Arnold Arboretum on Zoom with Jared Rubinstein as he reveals the layers of change in this beloved landscape.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 05

    The Stories We Tell and the Objects We Keep: Asian American Women and the Archives

    1:00pm to 3:30pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The stories of Asian American women extend far beyond the geographic borders of the United States. Inspired by tales and objects from family history, their narratives often reflect the transnational nature of Asian American women’s lives. Despite the importance of these narratives to expanding and complicating our understanding of war, migration, inequity, and difference, the accounts and perspectives of Asian American women have often been overlooked in formal records, and the tangible objects providing critical evidence of their histories have been ignored. This program will bring...

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    2021 Mar 04

    Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Julie Bargmann, “Modesty”

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Toxic Beauty. Troubled Allure. Fallow Fairness. Not Vacant, Open. Not Abandoned, Changing.

    D.I.R.T. cultivates a perverse attraction and an unapologetic approach to wrecked landscapes.

    Not Restorative, Regenerative.

    The work holds back. It doesn’t make everything perfectly okay. The work listens. It hears them above trying to make sense, below the ground producing heritage. The work hurts. It flips preconceptions of stuck minds. The work is messy. It’s all about finding. The work emerges.

    It doesn’t descend. The work leaves. It lets you in....

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    2021 Mar 01

    Ilze and Heinrich Wolff, “Homage and Refusal”

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Wolff is a design studio concerned with developing an architectural practice of consequence through the mediums of design, advocacy, research and documentation. The Wolff team is led by Ilze & Heinrich Wolff who work collaboratively with a group of highly skilled, committed and engaged architects, creative practitioners and administrators.

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    2021 Feb 24

    Latinx Modernism and the Spirit of Latinoamericanismo

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    John Alba Cutler, associate professor of English and Latinx studies at Northwestern University, is working on a new book examining the prodigious literary archive of early-20th-century Spanish-language newspapers in the United States. Newspapers in Latinx communities from New York to San Diego published tens of thousands of poems, short stories, chronicles, and serialized novels. These works show how Latinx communities grappled with the collision of Latin American and US modernities long before the advent of what we think of as “modern” Latinx literature.

    ...

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    2021 Feb 23

    Senior Loeb Scholar Lecture: Walter Hood

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The Senior Loeb Scholars program invites prominent individuals whose expertise is outside the typical disciplines of the GSD or whose practice displays a unique focus. Scholars are welcomed for a short-term residency at the School, during which they present a public lecture, workshops, and other engagements. Since its inception, the program has offered the GSD community opportunities to learn from and engage with visionary designers, scholars, and thought leaders.

    Walter Hood is the Spring 2021 Senior Loeb Scholar. Hood joins a cohort of previous Senior Loeb Scholars, which...

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    2021 Feb 18

    Kate Thomas, “Lesbian Arcadia: Desire and Design in the Fin-de-Siècle Garden”

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    At the end of the nineteenth century, British and American lesbian artists settled around Florence, Italy, renovating neglected Renaissance estates. Contemporary accounts describe the hillside region as colonized by a “cult of women.” These women restored, refashioned and theorized gardens as places of queerly mythic erotic encounter.

    In this lecture Professor Thomas will explore how design features such as nymphaeums, water parterres, secret gardens, grottos and boscos provided both refuge and open-air expression for lesbian subjectivity. Remembering that the first documented...

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    2021 Feb 11

    And So On: Reading and Conversation with Kiese Laymon

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Writer Kiese Laymon will explore whether the actual histories of American colleges and universities should be ripe sites for Black American horror and comedic narratives. Laymon will create a live novella and a live essay during this talk, while questioning the ethics of making art “for” an audience longing for both titillation and innocence from the horrific histories of Black Americans in and around American institutions of higher learning.

    ...

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    2020 Dec 08

    Author Discussion: Black And Buddhist: What Buddhism Can Teach Us about Race, Resilience, Transformation, and Freedom

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Buddhism is a way of life, a philosophy, a psychology,  a set of ethics, a religion, or a combination thereof. Central to the many ways Buddhism is understood is the achievement of emotional, mental, and psychological wellness. African Americans are at perpetual risk of psychological imbalance and trauma due to the social realities of racism in the United States. The authors engage the question, What can Buddhism offer African Americans who want to be emotionally resilient in a context they cannot...

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    2020 Dec 04

    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: Chinese Gold from the Winthrop Collection

    11:00am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Since we are unable to welcome you into the museums at this time, we are bringing our experts to you in a new online series, Art Study Center Seminars at Home.

    When Grenville Lindall Winthrop left his extensive collection to the Fogg Art Museum in 1943, it contained three gold plaques dating to China’s Warring States period (475–221 BCE). Never displayed to the public, the plaques remained a mystery until recent excavations and archival records shed new light on their origins. In this seminar, curator Sarah Laursen investigates the decoration and function of the gold...

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    2020 Dec 03

    Student Guide Tour: The Bind of Beauty—Nature, Art, and Femininity, with Sophia Mautz

    8:00pm to 8:30pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Join us live on Zoom for a Student Guide Tour!

    Sophia Mautz ’21 examines the tensions between nature and artifice in the construction of feminine beauty. She will lead an interactive discussion of the sculptures Nature Study by Louise Bourgeois and Daphne by Renée Sintenis as well as the painting Under the Cherry Blossoms (an illustration for the Tale of Genji) by Tosa Mitsunobu.

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    2020 Dec 03

    2020 Visions

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Too often, the story of women’s suffrage unfolds in a vacuum, seemingly unconnected from the general contours of American history. This panel discussion looks back from the present, asking experts working in a variety of disciplines and organizations to briefly unfold, TED-talk style, a single “big idea” that captures the significance of the 19th Amendment for voting rights, citizenship, and democracy today.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

    ...

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    2020 Dec 02

    White Whales, White Males, Whitehead with Lisa Jarnot

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    This lecture, which is part of the Bagley Wright Lecture Series on Poetry, explores the doctrine of discovery that haunts American poetry. Lisa Jarnot engages in an autobiographical interrogation of what it means to be a woman in a male-centered experimental tradition, and what it means to have white privilege and write poetry. Several questions arise: What do we keep and what do we reject as we acknowledge the systemic racism and American exceptionalism that pervade even the most benign of bohemian writing communities? Is there something transcendent and healing in the poet’s...

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    2020 Dec 02

    “Imperfectly Known”: Nicholas Said and the Routes of African American Narrative

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    In this lecture, author Ira Dworkin will talk about his book in-progress “’Imperfectly Known’: Nicholas Said and the Routes of African American Narrative,” which examines the ways that the intellectual and political culture of Borno, in northeast Nigeria, shaped Black literary culture in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries. Focusing on the writings of Said, who came to the United States after his manumission in Europe and who soon thereafter fought in the Civil War, Dworkin’s book broadly considers the relationship of African and Islamic intellectual networks to Black...

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    2020 Oct 29

    Open House Lecture: Nikil Saval, “A Rage in Harlem”

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    This talk will consider the moment when June Jordan and Buckminster Fuller attempted to reimagine Harlem in the wake of the 1964 riots, considered against a larger context of experiments in social housing, environmental planning, urban rebellion, and Afro-futurism.

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    2020 Oct 29

    Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    “What college does, it helps us learn about the nation,” said Rodney Spivey-Jones, a 2017 Bard College graduate currently incarcerated at Fishkill Correctional Facility in New York, in the docuseries College behind Bars. “It helps us become civic beings. It helps us understand that we have an interest in our community, that our community is a part of us and we are a part of it.”

    The Bard Prison Initiative and programs at other institutions of higher learning across the country have brought together teachers and learners in incarcerated spaces for years. This panel will gather...

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    2020 Oct 27

    American Cultural Landscapes: Black Roots and Treasures

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Everett L. Fly believes that African American legacies are embedded in the physical and cultural substance of many of America’s built and vernacular places. Formal education in architecture introduced him to the positive potential of planning and design in respecting and expressing the cultures of people wherever they live, work and play. He believes that American planning and design should be more deliberate in reflecting and respecting a broader cultural diversity, including Black and Indigenous people.

    Fly will discuss research, discovery, interpretation and applications of...

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    2020 Oct 22

    New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    By the early 1980s, a new political landscape was taking shape that would fundamentally influence American society and politics in the decades to come. That year, the long-standing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—championed by suffragist Alice Paul and introduced to Congress in 1923—ran aground, owing in significant measure to the activism of women who pioneered a new brand of conservatism.

    This panel will draw together strands and stories that are often kept separate: the ideas and growing influence of conservative women, the political activism of gay communities...

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    2020 Oct 21

    James Baldwin: The Making of an American Icon

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Robert F. Reid-Pharr is a professor of studies of women, gender, and sexuality and of African and African American studies at Harvard University. During his Radcliffe fellowship year, Reid-Pharr is completing a draft of "James Baldwin: The Making of an American Icon." Drawing heavily on archival materials housed at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the Houghton and Beinecke Libraries of Harvard and Yale Universities, the book follows the story of Baldwin’s life from birth to death. Join Reid-Pharr as he explores how Baldwin achieved his celebrity status and why...

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    2020 Oct 19

    Science and Cooking Public Lecture: “Honorary Book Celebration Lecture”

    7:00pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    The lectures pair Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. The series is based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but public lectures do not replicate course content.

    Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course. This week's topic is "Honorary Book Celebration Lecture."

    ...

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