Events

    Are Koreans Human? A Lecture with Best-Selling Author Min Jin Lee

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Who are the modern Koreans, and what do they care about? Koreans have experienced colonialism, diaspora, war, national division, immigration, and a persistent nuclear threat—and yet, they have achieved extraordinary gains in their homelands and elsewhere. Min Jin Lee, the author of the novels Free Food for Millionaires and Pachinko who is working on the third novel of The Koreans trilogy, will explore the will of Koreans to survive and flourish as global citizens, their enduring faith in education, and the costs of such a quest and what it may mean...

    Read more about Are Koreans Human? A Lecture with Best-Selling Author Min Jin Lee

    Lecture and Book Signing: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    After World War II, evolutionary scientists began rethinking their views on humanity’s past. What if human history was not merely a cooperative struggle against a harsh environment? What if violence and war were normal states of existence, punctuated by brief moments of peace? These are the questions Erika Lorraine Milam explores in her new book, Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America. She will discuss how anthropologists and zoologists during the Cold-War era struggled to reconcile humanity’s triumph as a species with the possibility that this...

    Read more about Lecture and Book Signing: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America

    Photographing Tutankhamun: How the Camera Helped Create “King Tut”

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Christina Riggs, Professor of the History of Art and Archaeology, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

    When Howard Carter found the sealed entrance to Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, he secured the services of archaeological photographer Harry Burton to document the site. Over the course of ten years, Burton produced more than 3,000 glass negatives of the tomb, its contents, and the many people—including Egyptian men, women, and children—who participated in the excavation. Christina Riggs will discuss how Burton’s photography helped create “King Tut” at a...

    Read more about Photographing Tutankhamun: How the Camera Helped Create “King Tut”

    Schlesinger 75th Anniversary Celebration

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA

    In this performance and discussion, “The Suffragists” captures the power and passion of American women’s fight for the vote through song. Created by the acclaimed singer-songwriter Shaina Taub, the musical tells the story of the last decade of the struggle through the rivalry between Carrie Chapman Catt and Alice Paul. Taub’s musical gives voice to these women in ways that powerfully resonate in today’s political landscape. The performance will be followed by a multidisciplinary panel discussion.

    ...

    Read more about Schlesinger 75th Anniversary Celebration

    Origins of the Silk Roads

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Approximately 4,000 years ago, the peoples of China and Eurasia gradually began to develop networks of interaction and exchange that radically transformed the cultures of both regions. These networks eventually gave rise to the Silk Road trade routes connecting the East and West. Rowan Flad will examine the archaeological evidence—from the Qijia Culture of Northwest China—that documents the agricultural, metallurgical, and technological innovations that resulted from the earliest trans-Eurasian exchanges, and how studies of the Silk Road origins are being reinvigorated by China’s One...

    Read more about Origins of the Silk Roads

    Memories of the Kings and Queens of Kush: Archaeology and Heritage at El Kurru

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Geoff Emberling, Research Scientist, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology; Lecturer, Department of Near Eastern Studies, University of Michigan

    Ancient Nubia was one of Africa’s earliest centers of political authority, wealth, and military power. After the Nubian kings and queens of Kush rose to power around 800 BCE, they controlled a vast empire along the Middle Nile (now Northern Sudan) and conquered Egypt to rule as its Twenty-fifth Dynasty. The kingdom’s political center, known as El Kurru, was first excavated by George Reisner in 1918–1919 on behalf of the...

    Read more about Memories of the Kings and Queens of Kush: Archaeology and Heritage at El Kurru

    Film Screening & Panel Discussion: The Cinema of Patience: Reflecting on N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Thirty years after its release, N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman remains an exemplar of ethnographic filmmaking. Directed and edited by John Marshall and Adrienne Miesmer, the film documents the life of N!ai, a Ju/hoan woman and the harsh realities of apartheid in 1980s Namibia, and it presents an intimate portrait of life in one of the last hunting and gathering communities. In honor of the fiftieth anniversary of Documentary Educational Resources, this program will explore the film’s importance to the preservation of intangible culture, and Marshall’s influence on...

    Read more about Film Screening & Panel Discussion: The Cinema of Patience: Reflecting on N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman
    2018 Oct 01

    Adam and Eve

    Repeats every day until Sun Jan 06 2019 .
    (All day)

    Location: 

    University Teaching Gallery, Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138

    For most of history, humans expressed ethical ideas through stories, and of all these the story of Adam and Eve has been perhaps the most powerful... Read more about Adam and Eve

    Palace Walls

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Ave, Cambridge
    Four Day Program For Students in Grades 3-4
     
    Explore art using old and new technologies to learn more about life in ancient kingdoms.... Read more about Palace Walls

Pages