Events

    The Quest for Ethical Artificial Intelligence: A Conversation with Timnit Gebru

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Timnit Gebru is the founder and executive director of the Distributed Artificial Intelligence Research Institute (DAIR). Prior to that she was fired by Google—where she was serving as co-lead of the Ethical AI research team—in December 2020 for raising issues of discrimination in the workplace. Timnit also cofounded Black in AI, a nonprofit that works to increase the presence, inclusion, visibility, and health of Black people in the field of AI; and is on the board of AddisCoder, a nonprofit dedicated to teaching algorithms and computer programming to Ethiopian high school students, free...

    Read more about The Quest for Ethical Artificial Intelligence: A Conversation with Timnit Gebru

    Art Talk Live: A Conversation with Allan Edmunds

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Founded by Allan Edmunds in Philadelphia in 1972, the Brandywine Workshop and Archives provides a fertile environment for artists from diverse backgrounds to create cutting-edge prints. Reflecting on 50 years of artist residencies, educational outreach, and community building, Edmunds will discuss highlights from Brandywine’s history and share goals for new projects ahead.

    ...

    Read more about Art Talk Live: A Conversation with Allan Edmunds

    A True Social Safety Net or Hanging On By A Thread?

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    M-RCBG Senior Fellow Aparna Mathur will moderate a discussion on the complexity and effectiveness of the US Social Safety Net and whether it provides strong protection against adverse life and market outcomes. Panelists will discuss lessons learned from the pandemic and propose ideas for fixing the broken parts of the system.

    Learn more and RSVP for this virtual event.

    Read more about A True Social Safety Net or Hanging On By A Thread?

    Arrival: Panel Discussion

    Location: 

    Mind Brain Behavior Interfaculty Initiative at Harvard—Online

    When aliens touchdown on Earth, linguistics professor Louise Banks (Amy Adams) and her team are tasked with determining why they are here and what they want. Our experts will discuss and debate the challenges that may arise in communicating with alien lifeforms and where the film succeeded and/or failed in this regard.

    Learn more and RSVP for this virtual event.

    Read more about Arrival: Panel Discussion

    Aga Khan Program Lecture: Mariam Kamara, “atelier masōmī: pedagogy, practice and (shifting) possibilities”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Mariam Issoufou Kamara is an architect from Niger who studied architecture at the University of Washington. In 2014, she founded atelier masōmī, an architecture and research practice with offices in Niger’s capital, Niamey. The firm tackles public, cultural, residential, commercial, and urban design projects. Kamara believes that architects have an important role to play in creating spaces that have the power to elevate, dignify, and provide people with a better quality of life.

    From the speaker:
    "The Architecture canon, the way it is researched, taught and practiced,...

    Read more about Aga Khan Program Lecture: Mariam Kamara, “atelier masōmī: pedagogy, practice and (shifting) possibilities”

    Next in Climate Change: The Ethel and David Jackson Next in Science Program

    Location: 

    Online or at Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The speakers in “Next in Climate Change” will discuss emerging scientific research and multi-dimensional implications of climate change for people, society, and our planet. The program will focus on five critical areas of inquiry and the connections among them: extreme weather and its impacts on communities, infrastructure, and the environment; economic effects of climate change, as well as economic opportunities; consequences of climate change on global health, ranging from cancer to pandemics; impacts on particularly vulnerable populations; and approaches to mitigation for the...

    Read more about Next in Climate Change: The Ethel and David Jackson Next in Science Program

    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: The Blues—Cobalt and Indigo in Asian Art

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In Asia, the mineral cobalt has long been used as a colorant in ceramic glazes, and indigo dye, derived from plants of the Indigofera genus, has been employed in textiles and paints. In this Art Study Center Seminar, a curator, conservators, and a conservation scientist consider the history of blue through the ceramics, textiles, and paintings now on view in the Picturing the Lives of Women installation in the Asian art galleries.

    ...

    Read more about Art Study Center Seminar at Home: The Blues—Cobalt and Indigo in Asian Art

    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: The Blues—Cobalt and Indigo in Asian Art

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In Asia, the mineral cobalt has long been used as a colorant in ceramic glazes, and indigo dye, derived from plants of the Indigofera genus, has been employed in textiles and paints. In this Art Study Center Seminar, a curator, conservators, and a conservation scientist consider the history of blue through the ceramics, textiles, and paintings now on view in the Picturing the Lives of Women installation in the Asian art galleries.

    ...

    Read more about Art Study Center Seminar at Home: The Blues—Cobalt and Indigo in Asian Art

    500 Years of Women Authors, Authorizing Themselves

    Location: 

    Amy Lowell Room (2nd Floor), Houghton Library, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

    Let us introduce you to some of the most infamous female authors you’ve never heard of who carved out cultural spaces for themselves. Our challenge to you: Remember their names. Share their stories. Rewrite history.

    Highlights include:

    • A copy of Phillis Wheatley's collection of poems autographed by the author

    • A mysterious ownership inscription by a medieval woman named "Johanna" in a copy of Jerome's Vitas Patrum

    • Mary Wroth's copy of Xenophon's Cyropaedia, bearing her cryptic monogram...

    Read more about 500 Years of Women Authors, Authorizing Themselves

    Senior Loeb Scholar Lecture: Lesley Lokko

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The Senior Loeb Scholars program invites prominent individuals whose expertise is outside the typical disciplines of the GSD or whose practice displays a unique focus. Scholars are welcomed for a short-term residency at the School, during which they present a public lecture and engage directly with GSD students, faculty, staff, researchers, Loeb Fellows, and others. Since its inception, the program has offered the GSD community opportunities to learn from and be in discourse with...

    Read more about Senior Loeb Scholar Lecture: Lesley Lokko

    Art Exhibition | Seeds for Tomorrow: Woody Plants of the Arnold Arboretum

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    Laura Fantini uses colored pencil to render seeds in exquisite, hyper-realistic drawings. This series is called “Hope,” and therein lies the power of seeds. They are emblematic of both birth and growth—small, complicated, and extraordinary, like the wonderful drawings in this exhibition.

    Learn more about and view this virtual exhibition....

    Read more about Art Exhibition | Seeds for Tomorrow: Woody Plants of the Arnold Arboretum

    "A Blessing" and Little Black Library at Harvard Business School: Virtual Author Chat to Celebrate Black History Month

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    HBS's iconic Baker Library is the largest business library in the world—and its collection expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic. For the first time in its 95-year history, Baker brought in non-business books, over 170 titles (to date) organized by Cathy Chukwulebe (MBA 2021) as part of her new non-profit, Little Black Library (LBL).

    In response to the racial and social unrest of 2020, Cathy launched Little Black Library to promote Black authors and conversations about the Black experience through books and events at libraries and other partners around the U.S.

    When...

    Read more about "A Blessing" and Little Black Library at Harvard Business School: Virtual Author Chat to Celebrate Black History Month

    Poetry Reading and Discussion with Camille T. Dungy

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Camille T. Dungy is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Trophic Cascade (Wesleyan University Press, 2017), winner of the Colorado Book Award, and the essay collection Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood and History (W.W. Norton, 2017), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Dungy has also edited anthologies including Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry (University of Georgia Press, 2009) and From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate...

    Read more about Poetry Reading and Discussion with Camille T. Dungy

    Latinx Experiences in U.S. Schools: Voices of Students, Teachers, Teacher Educators, and Education Allies in Challenging Sociopolitical Times

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Edited by Margarita Jiménez-Silva, Ed.M.'92, Ed.D.'02 and Janine Bempechat, Ed.M.'79, Ed.D.'86, this important volume brings together voices of Latinx students, teachers, teacher educators, and education allies in Latinx communities to reveal ways in which today's sociopolitical context has given rise to politically-sanctioned hateful anti-immigrant rhetoric. Contributors—key stakeholders in the education of immigrant Latinx children, youth, and college students—share how this rhetoric has exacerbated existing systemic injustices within K-Higher Education. Understanding that teaching and...

    Read more about Latinx Experiences in U.S. Schools: Voices of Students, Teachers, Teacher Educators, and Education Allies in Challenging Sociopolitical Times

    36th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Virtual Brunch

    Location: 

    Cambridge NAACP—Online

    The 36th Annual Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Brunch will be held virtually on Saturday, February 26, 2022 at 11:00am ET. This year's theme is: "Our Beloved Community in Action: What will it take to build an anti-racist city?"

    The Cambridge Branch NAACP was among the first to adopt the celebration of Dr. King’s birthday, even before its declaration as a national holiday. For over three decades, our Annual MLK Brunch has honored the legacy of Dr. King and recognized community leaders committed to social justice and public service.

    This year, our two...

    Read more about 36th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Virtual Brunch

    Book Talk - The Unimagined Community: Imperialism and Culture in South Vietnam

    Location: 

    Harvard University Asia Center—Online

    The unimagined community proposes a reexamination of the Vietnam War from a perspective that has been largely excluded from historical accounts of the conflict, that of the South Vietnamese. Challenging the conventional view that the war was a struggle between the Vietnamese people and US imperialism, the study presents a wide-ranging investigation of South Vietnamese culture, from political philosophy and psychological warfare to popular culture and film. Beginning with a genealogy of the concept of a Vietnamese “culture,” as the latter emerged during the colonial...

    Read more about Book Talk - The Unimagined Community: Imperialism and Culture in South Vietnam

    Lessons from Plants

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Plants are essential to humans and the environment: they provide food, absorb carbon dioxide, produce oxygen, serve multiple ecosystem functions, and beautify landscapes. In Lessons from Plants (Harvard University Press, 2021) Beronda Montgomery invites us to appreciate our interdependence with plants and the many lessons that can be gained from a better understanding of the ways in which plants grow, adapt, and thrive.

    In this conversation with Brenda Tindal, she will address what plants can teach us about relating to one another, building diverse communities and...

    Read more about Lessons from Plants

    Everything That Doctors Want to Know About Reproductive Rights Litigation, But Are Too Afraid to Ask

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Current and past abortion legislation and court rulings have profound effects on health care providers’ ability to care for their patients. However, media coverage of abortion in the U.S. typically is not geared toward an audience of health care professionals. Health care providers are thus left on their own to grapple with questions of what they can or cannot do within the scope of ever-changing law and policy.

    This event aims to address that gap, answering the questions health care providers might have about legal doctrine around abortion and what it means for their practice...

    Read more about Everything That Doctors Want to Know About Reproductive Rights Litigation, But Are Too Afraid to Ask

    Small Infrastructures

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Although accessible housing has been cast in many forms, accessory dwelling units (ADUs) have been a catalyst for including architects in direct policy development. For the first time, cities are directly contracting with architects to provide designs for private property through pre-approved ADU programs. These programs reflect a plurality of ideas, though without rigorous consideration for how the costs of site work, labor, materials, and energy make quality housing sustainable.

    Small Infrastructures is an exhibition of ADU designs that uses the economics of...

    Read more about Small Infrastructures

    Witch-Hazel Walk

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum (Hunnewell Building), 125 Arborway, Boston

    Join a docent tour through the Arboretum looking for the vibrant colors of the witch-hazel flowers. Learn about plants native to China and Japan, those from the Ozarks and Mississippi, and even one that was introduced right here at the Arnold Arboretum!

    The walk is geared toward adults, and starts from the kiosk in front of the Hunnewell Building at 125 Arborway. This tour is limited to 15 participants. We ask that you only register if you are sure you will attend, and only register one person per form submission. Masks are required if you are unvaccinated.

    ...

    Read more about Witch-Hazel Walk

Pages