Events

    2020 Oct 01

    What Studying Putin’s Russia Can Teach Us about the United States: Masculinity, Misogyny, and U.S. Elections in the Trump Era

    12:30pm to 1:45pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    Vladimir Putin has long been known for his macho displays, and Donald Trump for his misogynist pronouncements. In both the U.S. and Russia, machismo and misogyny play fundamental roles in politics; the former is used to legitimize particular politicians as strong leaders, and the latter to undermine opponents as weak. In their lecture, while drawing parallels to Russia, Professors Robert Boatright and Valerie Sperling will focus on their new book about masculinity and misogyny in the U.S. political context, exploring how Donald Trump’s misogyny in the 2016 presidential race changed the...

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    2020 Sep 30

    The Geography of Lethal Force

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    The use of deadly force by US law enforcement is extremely high by international standards and involves significant racial disparities. Rajiv Sethi RI ’21, professor of economics at Barnard College, Columbia University, will discuss his project to understand why geographic variations in scale and racial disparities exist and potential policy remedies.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 22

    50th Anniversary of Urban Design Lecture: Alex Krieger, “The American City Prior and (Possibly) Following the Pandemic”

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event, Graduate School of Design

     

    American instincts oscillate between the allure of the city and that of life free of city stress; between the temptations of the metropolis, and bucolic retreat from those very centers of civic life. Such oscillation, occurring across American history, have on the one hand enabled the building of Manhattan, the ‘Capital of Capitalism’ (and culture, too) and the invention of the ‘garden suburb’ where family grace was to dwell, prior to metastasizing into sprawl.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 21

    Understanding the Role of Race in Health

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Law School, The Petrie-Flom Center

    Structural racism pervades all facets of society, from education, to housing, to law enforcement. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the health disparities that result from this systemic and structural racism.

    The Petrie-Flom Center has asked leading scholars in law, public health, history, sociology, and other fields to explore these issues for a digital symposium on the Bill of Health blog. The focus of the symposium is to unpack how critical race theories and other strands of racial justice scholarship can inform health care, public health, and other areas of law to...

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    2020 Sep 17

    Observatory Night: What Stars Are Made Of

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    Join the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian for a virtual Public Observatory Night with guest lecturer Donavan Moore, author of "What Stars Are Made Of: The Life of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin."

    It was not easy being a woman of ambition in early twentieth-century England, much less one who wished to be a scientist. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin overcame prodigious obstacles to become a woman of many firsts: the first to receive a PhD in astronomy from Radcliffe College, the first promoted to full professor at Harvard, the first to head a department there. And, in what...

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    2020 Sep 16

    Lecture: Apprenticeship in Ancient Egypt

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East

    Presenter: Willeke Wendrich, Joan Silsbee Chair of African Cultural Archaeology; Professor of Egyptian Archaeology and Digital Humanities, University of California, Los Angeles

    Archaeologists study stylistic and technological changes in excavated materials—especially pottery—to better understand developments in ancient Egyptian society. However, little attention has focused on using the archaeological record to understand the transfer of cultural knowledge. How did people learn the arts and crafts of potters, basket makers, metalworkers, and scribes?...

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    2020 Sep 15

    Perfecters of This Democracy: A Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    Nikole Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter and creator of the 1619 Project, will engage in conversation with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, about pressing issues of race, civil rights, injustice, desegregation, and resegregation.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 15

    Imagining the Next Global Economy

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard

    There is no going back to the beginning. The emerging global economy will not resemble the system that came before. That pre-pandemic system was already fragile. Now we have an opportunity to imagine a new global economy.

    Join Rawi Abdelal, (Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Business, Harvard Business School; Director, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University) for a virtual lecture on this topic.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 10

    Getting Out the BIPOC Vote: Digital Strategies to Build Power

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Ash Center

    Activists and practitioners were already preparing for a tumultuous election year before the COVID-19 pandemic hit our shores. Now, the months ahead present immense challenges—and opportunities—for redefining how civic engagement is practiced for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities.

    Join the Harvard Kennedy School for a timely discussion with leading practitioners who are effectively integrating digital strategies with authentic power-building while navigating a never-before-seen civic environment. All share a mission of giving real agency to vulnerable...

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    2020 Aug 07

    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: Sketches in Clay

    11:00am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In this session, senior objects conservator Tony Sigel will take a closer look at architect and sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s terracotta models for the marble sculptures that would transform the visual landscape of 17th-century Rome. Sigel will reveal the intimate details of Bernini’s modeling process and his signature techniques.

    Led by:
    Tony Sigel, Senior Conservator of Objects and Sculpture, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies

    ...

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    2020 Jul 10

    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: Practical Magic—Powerful Objects from Ancient Egypt

    11:00am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Since we are unable to welcome you into the museums at this time, we are bringing our experts and collections to you in an online series, Art Study Center Seminars at Home.

    Heka, the ancient Egyptian word that we translate as “magic” today, was neither marginal nor deviant in the Egyptian world. It was an important part of life and death, healing and protection. In this seminar, curatorial fellow Jen Thum will explore objects that are the subject of new research and discuss how they put magic to work during life and the afterlife.

    ...

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    2020 Jun 17

    The Bridge: Natural Gas in a Redivided Europe

    12:30pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Three decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the breakup of the Soviet empire, the West faces a new era of East-West tensions. Any vision of a modern Russia integrated into the world economy and aligned in peaceful partnership with a reunited Europe has abruptly vanished. Two opposing narratives vie to explain the strategic future of Europe, one geopolitical and one economic, and both center on the same resource: natural gas. In The Bridge, Thane Gustafson, an expert on Russian oil and gas, argues that the political rivalries that capture the lions share of media attention...

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    2020 Jun 12

    Webinar: The Labor of Fashion, the Global COVID-19 Crisis, and the Politics of Resistance in Bangladesh

    9:00am to 10:30am

    Location: 

    Online Event

    The global apparel industry is currently facing an unprecedented crisis resulting from the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. Major fashion retailers in the Global North are closing their stores and laying off workers. The same brands that demonstrated strong public commitment for protecting the safety and security of Bangladeshi garment workers after the Rana Plaza collapse in 2013 are not hesitating to cancel or suspend orders or delay payments. Thousands of workers are currently out of work and facing a unique livelihood, as well as a health threat. 

    Bangladeshi local labor...

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    2020 Jun 04

    Democracy, Pandemic, and How We Move Forward

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Join the Ash Center for a International Festival of Arts and Ideas event. Former Connecticut Secretary of State Miles Rapoport will moderate a conversation with political commentator and author Heather McGhee, political activist and CEO of Voto Latino María Teresa Kumar, and political scholar Archon Fung, all of whom have spent their lives working to strengthen our democracy. Together they will explore the question: Where do we go from here?

    ...

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    2020 Jun 01

    U.S. Foreign Policy and China

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Join the Ash Center and John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum for a virtual event featuring:

    • Lucy Hornby, a fellow at the Nieman Center for Journalism and former Beijing deputy bureau chief for the Financial Times
    • Yasheng Huang, MIT professor of international management
    • Anthony Saich, Daewoo Professor of International Affairs, HKS, Ash Center Director

    ...

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    2020 Mar 05

    The Khufu Boat

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    In 1954, Egyptian archaeologist Kamal el-Mallakh discovered a 144-foot ship buried next to the Great Pyramid of Giza. The Khufu boat—one of the oldest-known planked vessels from antiquity—was interred in honor of Khufu, the pharaoh who built the Great Pyramid. Bob Brier will discuss what is known about the design, propulsion, and function of this 4,600-year- old ship, based on recent tank tests conducted on a model. He will also highlight plans to build a full-scale replica of the vessel and to place it on the Nile.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 27

    The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the tenth and eleventh centuries. The causes continue to be investigated and debated. Paleoenvironmental research over the past twenty years has revealed that the demise coincided with a prolonged, intensive drought that extended across the region, providing compelling evidence that climate change played a key role in the collapse of the Maya. Billie Turner will examine this evidence and the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 27

    The New Geopolitical Order

    4:15pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The new geopolitical environment taking shape in many parts of the world tends toward increasing authoritarianism and nationalistic competition. In this lecture, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, an international human rights advocate and the former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, will argue that the world’s people deserve better. Despite the demagoguery and isolationism that some leaders are pursuing, he believes it is possible to pursue thoughtful diplomacy and a system of connectivity, coalitions, and partnerships to reform institutions and change polices.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 20

    History Reconsidered: Poetry Reading and Discussion

    4:15pm

    Location: 

    Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    Join the Radcliffe Institute for a poetry reading and discussion with Clint Smith.

    Clint Smith is a doctoral candidate at Harvard University and an Emerson Fellow at New America. He has received fellowships from the Art For Justice Fund, Cave Canem, and the National Science Foundation, while his writing has been published in the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, Poetry Magazine, the Paris Review, and elsewhere. His first full-length collection of poetry, Counting Descent, was published in 2016. It won the 2017...

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    2020 Feb 13

    Ancient Egyptian Culture and Its Continuity in Modern Egypt

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Egypt’s recorded history spans six thousand years and is therefore one of the longest and best known in the world. Today, Egyptians practice several religious, artistic, and social traditions that can be traced to ancient Egypt, demonstrating the power and longevity of cultural memory. Drawing on research in archaeology, Egyptian art, writing, and culture, Fayza Haikal will examine Egyptian society’s cultural expressions from antiquity to the present, focusing on language, spirituality, superstitions, funerary traditions, and folklore.

    ...

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