Events

    Aude-Line Dulière, "The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Stories on Dismantling and Reuse"

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Dulière, winner of Harvard Graduate School of Design's 2018 Wheelwright Prize, presents the conclusion of her research proposal, offering a collection of stories on the use and reuse of materials across building sites, demolition sites, salvage yards, quarries, film sets, and other out-of-the-way locations.

    ...

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    Harvard Dance Center Showing: Initiation – In Love Solidarity

    Location: 

    Harvard Dance Center—Online or in-person

    Initiation – In Love Solidarity is a choreographic narrative exploring the embodiment of the Middle Passage, and the resilience and evolving identities of women in the African diaspora. A film component of the work was created at historic sites in New England related to the transatlantic slave trade and emancipation. The imagery of the cowrie shell is present throughout, chosen as an emblem of the transformative identity of the Black female body.

    Saturday, November 13, 4pm & 7pm: ...

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    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 2)

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Arts and sciences flourished in the Dutch Republic during the 17th century. Women such as Anna Maria van Schurman, Margareta van Godewick, and Anna Roemer Visscher excelled in scholarly pursuits and art practice. They were greatly admired, but they were nonetheless categorized as exceptional cases and never possessed the freedom to voice ideas enjoyed by their male counterparts. Working in a variety of art forms, including miniature painting, drawing, embroidery, and paper cutting, these women often meant to address no other audience than the artist herself.

    ...

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    Biogeography across Broken Continents and Sunken Islands

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    The major continents of the Southern Hemisphere—Africa, South America, Australia, Antarctica—as well as India and islands in the Pacific, were once part of Gondwana, an ancient supercontinent that began to break up about 180 million years ago. How did this breakup influence the evolution of ecosystems and organisms found on modern continents and islands? This is one of the questions that biogeography, the study of how organisms are distributed across space and time, seeks to answer. Gonzalo Giribet will discuss how he uses biogeography and tiny invertebrate species to understand the...

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    Tell the truth but tell it slant—Behind the Scenes of Apple TV+’s Dickinson

    Location: 

    Houghton Library—Online

    Join Houghton Library for a peek behind the scenes of Apple TV+’s Dickinson, a biographical comedy about poet Emily Dickinson. Show creator Alena Smith, Set Decorator Marina Parker, and Costume Designer Jennifer Moeller will be joined by Ernest Bernbaum Professor of English Deidre Lynch to delve into the research and creativity driving the show. The show’s archive—scripts, set and costume designs, tone books, and more—are now housed at Houghton Library as part of its Emily Dickinson Collection.

    ...

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    Where Does Our Leftover Food Go? A Conversation About Food Recovery at Harvard

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    Every day, Harvard Dining Services operates more than a dozen dining halls at Harvard College, and every day, a certain amount of hot food goes untouched. What happens to this leftover food? Join us for a discussion with Sasha Purpura, Executive Director at local non-profit, Food for Free, and Crista Martin, Director for Strategic Initiatives and Communications at HUDS. Learn more about what happens to leftover food in dining halls, how food insecurity affects the local community, and how Harvard students can reduce food waste and combat food insecurity.

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    Gutman Library Book Talk: 100 Days in Vietnam: A Memoir of Love, War, and Survival

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Painstakingly recreated from wartime letters and remembrances and contextualized by contemporary news accounts, 100 Days in Vietnam is a collaboration between Joe and his son Matthew A. Tallon, Ed.M.'09, Administrative Director of Faculty Support Services at HGSE, also an Army veteran.

    Here we experience the war through the emotions of the man who survived it: the drudgery and monotony of airfield life, the heartache of a newlywed missing his wife, the terror of combat missions, the agony of injury and rehabilitation, and the bittersweet relief from the completion of...

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    After-School Animal Encounters: Teeming Tidepools

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Tidepools exist where the land meets the ocean and the amazingly resilient creatures that live there manage the challenges of both environments. From swimming and climbing to burrowing, animals in tidepools have adapted many behaviors to live in an ever-changing world. Join human museum staffers Javier and Ryan as they lead you in a 45-minute program with live ocean invertebrates. This event will be fun for the whole family so bring your questions and sense of wonder.

    ...

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    The Climate of Resistance

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    This conversation is part of the series "Weather Reports: The Climate of Now." The featured speakers are Chloe Aridjis, award-winning novelist, Sea Monsters (2020) and organizer for Writers Rebel, and Wanjira Mathai, Regional Director for Africa at the World Resources Institute.

    Activists Aridjis and Mathai are powerful, fierce, compassionate leaders in the global environmental movement. A writer and an organizer, they are also the daughters of iconic conservation heroes: Homero Aridjis,...

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    Michael Twitty, "Beyond 'Slave Food': Re-Organizing the Perceptions and Potential of African American Foodways"

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Culinary historian Michael Twitty, author of the James Beard-winning book, The Cooking Gene, discusses the impact of the collective perceptions of African American foodways on how we experience a broader vision of healing. With such foodways often stigmatized as a continuation of socio-cultural trauma or defended with a mark of "authentic" racial identity, Twitty offers alternative ways to see how the revitalization of ancestral foodways and culinary justice is a necessary part of our collective national experience.

    ...

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    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 1)

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In the 17th century, the Dutch Republic was a fast-paced, successful, modern society—economically, politically, and artistically. The work ethic of its citizens amazed foreign visitors, who compared the Dutch to crawling ants. Its flourishing art production showed the bustle of everyday life with almost scientific precision. Yet many artworks amassed by Dutch citizens in their homes portray scenes of silence and serenity. Such works, including genre pieces by Johannes Vermeer and still lifes featuring fruit, nuts or bread by Willem Heda and Adriaen Coorte, suggest a deep engagement with...

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    ArtsBites: Playwright Jocelyn Bioh

    Location: 

    Office for the Arts at Harvard—Online

    ArtsBites is the OFA round-table discussion series with undergraduate students and visiting artists. Discover and explore how you can create an expressive career and a performative life. Join us for a conversation with Jocelyn Bioh, performer and playwright who adapted Merry Wives of Windsor for Shakespeare in the Park in New York City. This event is in partnership with Harvard BlackCAST.

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    Virtual Student Guide Tour: This Land Is Whose Land?, with Jacqueline Zoeller

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    On this tour commemorating Native American Heritage Month, Jacqueline Zoeller ’23 will contrast colonial visions of the Western U.S. landscape, such as Albert Bierstadt’s Rocky Mountains, “Lander’s Peak” (1863), with the realities lived and portrayed by Native American artists. Stops on the tour will include Diné artist Will Wilson’s Mexican Hat Disposal Cell (2020), a landscape photograph of Halchita, Utah, the Navajo...

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    Carl M. Sapers Ethics in Practice Lecture: Eric Klinenberg, “Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The future of democratic societies rests not simply on shared values but on shared spaces: the libraries, childcare centers, and parks where crucial connections are formed. Drawing on extensive sociological research, Klinenberg claims that “social infrastructure,” which he defines as the physical spaces that shape our interactions, plays an essential but unappreciated role in modern societies, generating inequalities in health, education, crime, climate vulnerability, and social networks. In this lecture, he shares key findings from his landmark book, Palaces for the People, and...

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    Between Worlds: China’s WWII Interpreters and Their Divergent Fates in China, Taiwan, and the United States

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    David Cheng Chang is an associate professor of humanities and the associate director of Global China Center at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. While at Radcliffe, he is using interdisciplinary source materials to write a book that will weave together the personal histories of more than 3,000 Chinese interpreters for the American and British allied forces during World War II with the larger military, political, diplomatic, and social history of World War II, the Chinese Civil War, the Korean War, and the Cold War. Join Chang as he discusses this project and the...

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    Daniela Bleichmar, “The history of cochineal and the changing value of Mexican indigenous environmental knowledge, ca. 1500–1800”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Before the development of synthetic dyes in the second half of the 1800s, natural dyes were some of the most prized and sought-after commodities in the global economy. This talk uses historical images and texts to excavate changing approaches to indigenous environmental knowledge in colonial Mexico and early modern Europe through the study of cochineal.

    This insect, native to the Americas, produced the world's best quality and most valuable red dye from the 1520s until the rise of the modern chemical dye industry. Long used by indigenous people in the Americas, under Spanish...

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    The Climate of Grief

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    This conversation is part of the series "Weather Reports: The Climate of Now." The featured speaker is poet Victoria Chang.

    Victoria Chang writes in her New York Times Notable Book of 2020, Obit, “I always knew that grief was something I could smell. But I didn’t know that it’s not actually a noun but a verb. That it moves.” After the deaths of her parents, she refused to write elegies; instead, Chang wrote poetic obituaries of the beautiful, broken world that surrounds her (many see them...

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