Events

    Women and the Making of the U.S. Foreign Policy Community

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    Who made the foreign policy community in the United States, and why does the answer matter? Scholars have traditionally looked to the men clustered around the Council on Foreign Relations, the Rockefeller and Carnegie philanthropies, and the Ivy League faculties to find the roots of the foreign policy "elite" or "establishment" in the years after World War I. But this seminar will show that this focus has obscured the absolute centrality of progressive white women in the making of the U.S. foreign policy community, particularly those former suffragists, trained scholars, and expert...

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    Schism 2.0: China and America’s Trade Conflict in the Next U.S. Administration

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Paul Blustein
    Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation; Senior Associate (non-resident), Simon Chair in Political Economy, Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS)

    Moderator: Christina Davis
    Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations; Professor of Government; and Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

    This seminar is part of the...

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    Creature Feature: Animals from Ancient Egypt

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Creature Features, a new online series from the Harvard Art Museums, offers a chance for families with children ages 6 and up to explore magical creatures across the collections through close looking and curious exploration with museum staff.

    Join Egyptologist Jen Thum for an interactive, family-friendly look at animals in ancient Egyptian art and life! Participants are encouraged to download and color along with our free activity book, Coloring Ancient Egypt...

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    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: Chinese Gold from the Winthrop Collection

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Since we are unable to welcome you into the museums at this time, we are bringing our experts to you in a new online series, Art Study Center Seminars at Home.

    When Grenville Lindall Winthrop left his extensive collection to the Fogg Art Museum in 1943, it contained three gold plaques dating to China’s Warring States period (475–221 BCE). Never displayed to the public, the plaques remained a mystery until recent excavations and archival records shed new light on their origins. In this seminar, curator Sarah Laursen investigates the decoration and function of the gold...

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    Election 2020: Youth in Power

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    Join the Institute of Politics for a discussion on the unprecedented turnout and impact from young voters 18–29 years old.

    Ashley Allison, former National Coalitions Director for Biden for President, and Peter Hamby, host of Snapchat’s Good Luck America and contributing writer for Vanity Fair, will join in a conversation moderated by John Della Volpe, Director of Polling at the Institute of Politics who was on leave in the fall semester from the Harvard Youth Poll to advise the Biden-Harris campaign. They will examine Biden’s communications and organizing strategy from the end...

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    2020 Visions

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Too often, the story of women’s suffrage unfolds in a vacuum, seemingly unconnected from the general contours of American history. This panel discussion looks back from the present, asking experts working in a variety of disciplines and organizations to briefly unfold, TED-talk style, a single “big idea” that captures the significance of the 19th Amendment for voting rights, citizenship, and democracy today.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

    ...

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    Violence After Victory: Explaining Human Rights Outcomes After Conflict Termination

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    What stops human rights abuse? Christopher Shay explores this question in the context of conflict terminations, moments when leaders can plausibly turn away from repressive tactics. Many leaders fail to seize this opportunity, however, even in cases of democratization. Drawing on cross-national quantitative findings and qualitative research conducted in Nepal, Shay argues that these leaders' options are often constrained by powerful security institutions—and that civil-military relations are critical to understanding human rights outcomes.

    ...

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    White Whales, White Males, Whitehead with Lisa Jarnot

    Location: 

    Online Event

    This lecture, which is part of the Bagley Wright Lecture Series on Poetry, explores the doctrine of discovery that haunts American poetry. Lisa Jarnot engages in an autobiographical interrogation of what it means to be a woman in a male-centered experimental tradition, and what it means to have white privilege and write poetry. Several questions arise: What do we keep and what do we reject as we acknowledge the systemic racism and American exceptionalism that pervade even the most benign of bohemian writing communities? Is there something transcendent and healing in the poet’s...

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    “Imperfectly Known”: Nicholas Said and the Routes of African American Narrative

    Location: 

    Online Event

    In this lecture, author Ira Dworkin will talk about his book in-progress “’Imperfectly Known’: Nicholas Said and the Routes of African American Narrative,” which examines the ways that the intellectual and political culture of Borno, in northeast Nigeria, shaped Black literary culture in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries. Focusing on the writings of Said, who came to the United States after his manumission in Europe and who soon thereafter fought in the Civil War, Dworkin’s book broadly considers the relationship of African and Islamic intellectual networks to Black...

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    Washington, Moscow, and the Beginning of the End of the Cold War

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Simon Miles tracks key events in US-Soviet relations in the first half of the 1980s. He argues that covert engagement gave way to overt conversation as both superpowers determined that open diplomacy was the best means of furthering their own, primarily competitive, goals. Miles narrates the history of these dramatic years, as President Ronald Reagan consistently applied a disciplined carrot-and-stick approach, reaching out to Moscow while at the same time excoriating the...

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    Make Us Great Again: The Causes and Consequences of Declinism in Great Powers

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    This seminar explores the causes and consequences of declinism in great powers. Why does the topic of the nation's international decline emerge in the political discourse of great powers? Why do leaders choose to focus on the nation's decline during some periods and not others? What are the foreign policy consequences of such declinist discourse?

    After outlining a theory of declinism's emergence and its consequences, this seminar focuses on 1970s Britain, the emergence of the New Right, and the declinist narratives of politicians like Margaret Thatcher and Keith Joseph....

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    Opportunities and Backlash: Reforms in Women’s Military Service in Israel

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    Establishing mandatory service for women in Israel in 1948 could signify gender equality; however, the military has maintained a rigid hierarchic gender division of labor for several decades. In the mid-1990s’, following Supreme Court rulings, several combat roles (including pilot course) were opened to women; the Women’s Corps was dismantled; and many courses were gender integrated.

    Professor Orna Sasson-Levy argues that these reforms had a dual effect: they broadened military opportunities for women, but at the same time led to a backlash of resistance that threatens these...

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    Reimagining Museums: Disruption and Change

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    As museums have acknowledged their legacy as colonial institutions, many have reimagined their mission as agents of decolonization and social justice. The pandemic disruption, the Black Lives Matter movement, and other community issues are driving still more rapid and drastic changes and providing opportunities for reflection and growth.

    How can American museums—especially those that have strong relationships with Indigenous communities—respond to current national conditions of social unrest and political turmoil? How have New England museums fared and what is likely to happen...

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    Carl M. Sapers Ethics in Practice Lecture: Black Reconstruction

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Ten Responses to One Question: What does it mean to imagine Black Reconstruction today?

    Join the Black Reconstruction Collective (BRC) for this lecture. The BRC provides funding, design, and intellectual support to the ongoing and incomplete project of emancipation for the African Diaspora. The BRC is committed to multi-scalar and multi-disciplinary work dedicated to dismantling systemic white supremacy and hegemonic whiteness within art, design, and academia. Founded by a group of Black architects, artists, designers, and scholars, the BRC aims to amplify knowledge...

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    Election 2020: What Just Happened?

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    The Institute of Politics hosts a panel of top political strategists to breakdown and analyze the results of the 2020 election. The conversation will be moderated by IOP Director Mark D. Gearan ’78, and feature former and current IOP Fellows Karen Finney, Senior Advisor for Communications and Political Outreach for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign, Scott Jennings, Senior Advisor to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Robby Mook, Campaign Manager for Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign, and Alice Stewart, IOP Fall 2020 Fellow and Republican Communications...

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    Post-Election Round-Up

    Location: 

    Center for American Political Studies at Harvard—Online

    Bill Kristol and William Galston will be meeting for their fifteenth much-anticipated biennial debate following the U.S. election, offering the perspectives of two reflective political participants and shrewd observers, both of them experts at providing what might be called partisan objectivity. This year, they will be joined by Jim Ceaser of the University of Virginia, a seasoned expert in American party politics. Moderated by Harvey Mansfield, Harvard University.

    ...

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    Open House Lecture: Nikil Saval, “A Rage in Harlem”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    This talk will consider the moment when June Jordan and Buckminster Fuller attempted to reimagine Harlem in the wake of the 1964 riots, considered against a larger context of experiments in social housing, environmental planning, urban rebellion, and Afro-futurism.

    Learn more about and RSVP for Open House Lecture: Nikil Saval, "A Rage in Harlem."

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    Voting, Participation, and Why it Matters

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

     

    Join Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, Cambridge Mayor Sumbul Siddiqui, Tova Wang, a Democracy Visiting Fellow at the Ash Center, Michelle Tassinari, Director and Legal Counsel of the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s Elections Division, and Eneida Tavares the Interim Commissioner for the City of Boston’s Elections Department for a conversation on the importance of local voter participation, education and civic engagement, and to learn more about what’s at stake for our...

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