Events

    Our Bodies, Ourselves Book Talk

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The final installment in the summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature a discussion of Our Bodies, Ourselves, first published in 1971. This event is organized in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the book’s first edition and in connection with the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective Records housed in the Schlesinger Library. The event will also include audience Q&A.

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    Art Talk Live: In Living Color—Memory, Movement, and Home in Delsarte’s Unity

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In this talk, Ph.D. candidate Kéla Jackson discusses the role of music, color, and interiority in Louis Delsarte’s 1995 print Unity, made during the artist’s residency at the Brandywine Workshop and Archives. Founded in Philadelphia in 1972 by Allan L. Edmunds, the workshop has supported generations of artists by fostering a deep sense of collective education and art making, foregrounding the “fresh, human and personal” aspects of art and the power of improvisation.

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    Book Talk with Daniel Carpenter

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The third installment of the Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Daniel Carpenter, author of Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790–1870 (Harvard University Press, 2021). Carpenter is the faculty director of the social sciences at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and the Allie S. Freed Professor of Government in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

    Carpenter's reading will be followed by a discussion with Nikki M. Taylor, professor of history and chair of the Department of History at Howard University. The event will also include an...

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    Book Talk with Tiya Miles

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The second installment of the Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Tiya Miles, author of All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley’s Sack, a Black Family Keepsake (Random House, 2021). Miles is a Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and a professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

    Miles's reading will be followed by a discussion with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and...

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    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: A Conversation with Drawings Collector George Abrams

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Curator Joachim Homann will discuss the themes, techniques, and function of Dutch drawings with preeminent collector George Abrams (Harvard College ’54, Harvard Law ’57), who is internationally regarded as the preeminent collector of historical Dutch drawings.

    Learn more about and register for this...

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    Book Talk with Clint Smith

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The first installment in the summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Clint Smith, author of How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America (Little, Brown and Company, 2021) and staff writer at The Atlantic. Smith's reading will be followed by a discussion with Kyera Singleton, executive director of the Royall House and Slave Quarters, in Medford, Massachusetts. The event will also include audience Q and A.

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    Virtual Student Guide Tour: LOL, with Cecilia Zhou

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Cecilia Zhou ’22 looks at the historically specific ways humor is deployed in a few serious works of art from across time that may make you laugh out loud (LOL). She’ll focus on the 1640s painting The Drunken Silenus, by Francesco Fracanzano; the 18th-century scroll painting Puppies with Hotei and Jittoku, by Nagasawa Rosetsu; and a...

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    Art Talk Live: Up Close and Personal—Looking at Ancient Textiles

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Egyptian makers were skilled at using only a few materials to create a rich variety of textiles, but we rarely have detailed information about the people who made them or their artistic processes.

    Join conservation fellow Julie Wertz to explore what close looking, microscopy, and micro-analytical techniques can teach us about the materials and methods these unknown makers used to create beautiful and functional art objects.

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    Martin Luther King & The Struggle for Voting Rights, Making Democracy Work

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    Join us for a special session in which Professor David Moss, author of the acclaimed book “Democracy: A Case Study,” makes history come alive with an audience-driven discussion of Martin Luther King Jr. and the struggle for voting rights. Professor Moss will bring his wildly popular approach to teaching the history of American democracy to a new stage in this public forum hosted by Harvard Business School.

    So please bring your ideas, and leave your preconceptions at the door. It will be an afternoon that challenges the way you think about America’s history and civic life – and...

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    How We Incarcerate Young People: A Conversation about Policy and Neuroscience

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Across the United States, children under the age of 18 can be tried as adults in criminal court. Although the practice is condemned by international law, we are the only country in the world that sentences young people to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At the same time, recent developments in neuroscience research demonstrate that the human brain is not fully developed until after the age of 25.

    This program will consider the ways we punish young people in the American criminal legal system and how our policies could be reformed. We will bring together a...

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    Reframing Japonisme: Painting Edo and Beyond

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    We’re bringing Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection to you! Join us for this final talk in our series of virtual conversations exploring themes highlighted in the exhibition.

    How has Japonisme shaped the reception of Japanese art? In this online program, professors Elizabeth Emery and Chelsea Foxwell will consider the persistent influence of the western construct of Japonisme and the new aesthetic forms it inspired.

    In 1872, French art critic Philippe Burty coined the term “Japonisme” to refer to the growing western admiration for “all things...

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    Creature Feature: Birds of a Feather

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Explore a vibrant collection of watercolors featuring a flock of fantastic birds inspired by a king’s royal menagerie in Jean-Baptiste Oudry’s Avian Album.

    Creature Feature, an online series from the Harvard Art Museums, offers a chance for families to explore magical creatures across the collections through close looking and curious exploration with museum staff. Creature Feature talks are free, open to explorers ages 6 and up, and offered once a...

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    Twenty Million Angry Men: A Conversation about the Importance of Including People with Felony Convictions in Our Jury System

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    In the United States, 8 percent of the adult population—and 33 percent of the Black adult male population—has a felony conviction. Even after people have served time in prison, they are systematically excluded from civic participation, including serving on juries. Offered in collaboration with the Institute to End Mass Incarceration at Harvard Law School, this program will explore questions of jury service, civic participation in the criminal legal system, and the importance of such participation by people with prior convictions.

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    Multilateral Cultural Diplomacy: A Conversation with UNESCO Director General Audrey Azoulay

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    In the third installment of the Future of Cultural Diplomacy Series, UNESCO’s Director-General Audrey Azoulay will offer her unique perspective on cultural diplomacy as the leader of one of the world’s largest multilateral agencies focused on education, scientific and cultural issues.

    In a conversation co-moderated by Ambassador Nicholas Burns and Carla Dirlikov Canales, Director-General Azoulay will discuss UNESCO’s current priorities, including education, culture, gender equality, and freedom of expression, and discuss how UNESCO has provided multilateral approaches to...

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    Art Talk Live: Käthe Kollwitz and the South African Left

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    German artist Käthe Kollwitz’s reception in the Global South has only recently begun to be considered. Known for its socialist and anti-war sentiments, her work was largely introduced to South Africa by exiles fleeing Nazism, and her prints became an important touchstone for many of the country’s politically minded artists in the years leading up to and during apartheid.

    Looking to Kollwitz’s 1905 cycle, Peasant’s War, Jessica Williams will explore how these images circulated among South Africa’s Left and how her work came to influence an entirely new generation of lesser-...

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    Radcliffe Day 2021

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    On Radcliffe Day 2021—Friday, May 28—Harvard Radcliffe Institute will award the Radcliffe Medal to Melinda Gates. 

    Expert panelists will then discuss achieving gender equity in the United States, each offering her own perspective informed by deep expertise and unique experience. The discussion will be moderated by the distinguished American historian and Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University Drew Gilpin Faust, who was founding dean of the Radcliffe Institute and the first woman to serve as president of Harvard.

    Following the panel...

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    Observatory Night: All That Glitters is Gold

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    The cosmic origin of gold has fascinated humans for millennia. In this talk, Professor of Astronomy Edo Berger will explore the long-standing question of how gold (and other rare elements) are created in the universe, showing that this process is intimately connected to the collision of neutron stars (the remnants of powerful supernova explosions)—and the production of gravitational waves.

    The Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian sponsors Observatory Nights on the third Thursday of select months. Observatory Nights feature a nontechnical lecture intended for...

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    Wild Collection and Propagation of Rare and Endangered Plants

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    In Massachusetts alone, plants make up more than half of the total native species that are officially considered Endangered, Threatened, and Rare. In this talk, we will focus on how ex-situ plant conservation, coordinated plant collection efforts, and plant propagation play vital roles in preserving biodiversity and slowing the deleterious effects of climate change.

    We will discuss how collection trips are planned—and how citizen science now plays a role in these efforts—while providing a behind-the-scenes look at the planning process. A large focus will be plant propagation...

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    After-School Animal Encounters: Movement

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Can you slither, hop, jump, climb, or even fly? How would you do these things with zero, two, four, or even a hundred legs? As winter melts away and warmer springtime weather blows in, all animals big and small are as excited to get out and move around as we are! Join human museum staffers Javier and Ryan in this live 45-minute family program as they discuss and take a look at some of our amazing animals in motion.

    Advance registration for this family friendly program is required.

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