Events

    2021 Jun 14

    Martin Luther King & The Struggle for Voting Rights, Making Democracy Work

    3:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    Join us for a special session in which Professor David Moss, author of the acclaimed book “Democracy: A Case Study,” makes history come alive with an audience-driven discussion of Martin Luther King Jr. and the struggle for voting rights. Professor Moss will bring his wildly popular approach to teaching the history of American democracy to a new stage in this public forum hosted by Harvard Business School.

    So please bring your ideas, and leave your preconceptions at the door. It will be an afternoon that challenges the way you think about America’s history and civic life – and...

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    2021 Jun 10

    Virtual Student Guide Tour: Staged, with Maeve Miller

    8:00pm to 8:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In her tour, Maeve Miller ’22 will explore how performance and entertainment figure into three works of art. She will examine the woodcut Magician (1956), which Erich Heckel made in Germany more than 40 years after the heyday of his involvement with the Expressionist art movement; the painting Ventriloquist (1952), which Jacob Lawrence made in Harlem, New York, as part of his Performance Series; and a woodblock print...

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    2021 Jun 10

    How We Incarcerate Young People: A Conversation about Policy and Neuroscience

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Across the United States, children under the age of 18 can be tried as adults in criminal court. Although the practice is condemned by international law, we are the only country in the world that sentences young people to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At the same time, recent developments in neuroscience research demonstrate that the human brain is not fully developed until after the age of 25.

    This program will consider the ways we punish young people in the American criminal legal system and how our policies could be reformed. We will bring together a...

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    2021 Jun 08

    Reframing Japonisme: Painting Edo and Beyond

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    We’re bringing Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection to you! Join us for this final talk in our series of virtual conversations exploring themes highlighted in the exhibition.

    How has Japonisme shaped the reception of Japanese art? In this online program, professors Elizabeth Emery and Chelsea Foxwell will consider the persistent influence of the western construct of Japonisme and the new aesthetic forms it inspired.

    In 1872, French art critic Philippe Burty coined the term “Japonisme” to refer to the growing western admiration for “all things...

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    2021 Jun 06

    World Bicycle Day Celebration

    12:00pm to 1:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Human-powered transportation helps protect the natural world that we so proudly share with museum visitors. It can also contribute to health and wellness by offering a fun way to get moving. Dedicated to cyclists of all ages, this program will inspire you to seek out warm-weather adventures on two wheels, learn more about biking’s many benefits, get maintenance and safety tips, discover nearby bike routes, find out what’s being done to improve urban biking infrastructure, and enjoy music made with and on bicycles!

    ...

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    2021 Jun 05

    Creature Feature: Birds of a Feather

    10:00am to 10:30am

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Explore a vibrant collection of watercolors featuring a flock of fantastic birds inspired by a king’s royal menagerie in Jean-Baptiste Oudry’s Avian Album.

    Creature Feature, an online series from the Harvard Art Museums, offers a chance for families to explore magical creatures across the collections through close looking and curious exploration with museum staff. Creature Feature talks are free, open to explorers ages 6 and up, and offered once a...

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    2021 Jun 02

    Virtual Student Guide Tour: Making Faces, with Cecilia Zhou

    11:00am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Student Guide Cecilia Zhou’s art-inspired makeup tutorials have appeared on the social media channels of the Harvard Art Museums and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In this tour, she will spend time with three paintings that inspired her: the 20th-century Head of a Woman by Russian Expressionist Alexei von Jawlensky, the 3rd-century Egyptian ...

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    2021 Apr 17

    Virtual Student Guide Tour: Climate Change, with Sophia Mautz

    11:00am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Sophia Mautz ’21 illuminates our unfolding climate crisis in her tour focused on three works of art: a 14th-century handscroll painting from Japan, Earthquake from the Legendary History of the Jin’o-ji; a photograph from 1978 by American artist Ana Mendieta, Untitled [filueta grass mound burnt with a cast iron hand, Iowa]; and ...

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    2021 Mar 31

    Food in Art

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Join the Harvard Art Museums on Zoom for a bite-size look at the role of food in art, presented in partnership with the Food Literacy Project at Harvard University Dining Services.

    From vegetable-based dyes to dairy fixatives, food and art share a long and interesting history. In this talk, curatorial and conservation fellows Ruby Awburn, Lauren Hanson, Leonie Mueller, and Julie Wertz will take us on a culinary tour of the Harvard Art Museums and discuss the varied roles that food has played in art.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 31

    MUTINY: poems

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Phillip B. Williams is the author of the poetry collection “Thief in the Interior.” His artistic interests manifest through lyrical and narrative investigations of the aesthetic possibilities and historical implications of the grotesque and through (re)creation of Afro-diasporic mythologies within contemporary timeframes.

    Join Williams as he discusses researching, writing, and revising poems (title: “Mutiny”) and prose (title: “Threshold”) during his Radcliffe fellowship year. Within both genres, he hopes to research and explore Black folklore, African-diasporic mythologies...

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    2021 Mar 30

    Members: Family Fun - Animal Problem Solvers

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Animals develop special characteristics that help them survive in their environments. From keeping warm to staying hidden, animals solve problems every day. Have you ever thought about how we humans do the same?

    Get ready for a lively night of fun, games, and surprises when Javier Marin transports you back inside the Harvard Museum of Natural History. He will broadcast from the galleries pointing out some of the ways animals adapt to challenges they face in the wild. Then, you will look through your own homes in a problem-solving scavenger hunt. Your family will work together...

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    2021 Mar 29

    Marc Angélil and Charlotte Malterre-Barthes, "Migrant Marseille: Architectures of Social Segregation and Urban Inclusivity"

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    On November 5, 2018, a pair of dilapidated buildings in central Marseille collapsed, taking the lives of eight people, many of them from immigrant origin. This toll of urban decay reflects both the diversity of the district and the hardship of living in Marseille, a city marked for centuries by migration, poverty, and social inequality. Divided along ethnic and class lines, with wealthy conservatives dominating the south and an energetic but pauperized community of immigrant origins in the north, Marseille highlights the tensions stemming from discriminatory governance, lack of housing-...

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    2021 Mar 26

    Rural Education in America: What Works for Our Students, Teachers, and Communities

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Rural Education in America provides a comprehensive framework for understanding the diversity and complexity of rural communities in the United States and for helping rural educators implement and evaluate successful place-based programs tailored for students and their families. Written by Geoff and Sky Marietta, educators who grew up in rural America and returned there to raise their children, the book illustrates how efficacy is determined by the degrees to which instruction, interventions, and programs address the needs and strengths of each unique rural community.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 25

    Black Is Queen: The Divine Feminine in Kush

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East—Online

    The prominence of powerful goddesses and queens in the Nubian Kingdom of Kush (now Northern Sudan) highlights the unusually high status of women in this ancient African society and serves as a fitting focus for the study of female power in the ancient world. Using temple inscriptions found in Egypt and Nubia, the rich funerary goods found in royal burials, and temple and tomb imagery, Solange Ashby will discuss how ancient Africans of the Nile Valley understood female power and presence. Songs from Beyoncé’s recent production "Black Is King" will be woven into this presentation on...

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    2021 Mar 25

    Ana María León and Torsten Lange, "Bodies of Work: Activism, Gender, Architecture"

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In this conversation, architectural historians Ana María León and Torsten Lange consider the labor of organizing around issues of gender in architecture. Based on three precedents, they will reflect on their work and practice and highlight how the present has allowed scholars and practitioners to revise architectural historiography. Building on intersectional feminist theory, the discussion considers architecture and urban space as well as architectural discourse as forums where white heteronormative systems of planning can become subverted by empowered labor and living practices....

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    2021 Mar 23

    Harvard Design Magazine reveals "Harvard Design Magazine #48: America"

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    "A terrible mechanism [is] on the march, its gears multiplying." So begins the first essay of the 48th issue of Harvard Design Magazine, guest edited by Mark Lee, chair of the department of architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and Florencia Rodriguez, editorial director of -Ness Magazine. The issue takes as its theme the slippery and ambiguous figure of "America," seen through the lens of the built and unbuilt environment. Americanization—once the "terrible mechanism" bent on pressing capitalist values on emerging economies everywhere—is now in...

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    2021 Mar 17

    "The Polynesian Problem": Western Studies of Pacific Islander Origins

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    "What is a Polynesian?" This is a question with a long and troubling history embedded in settler colonialism. From Europeans’ earliest encounters with the Pacific, White Europeans expressed a fascination and partial identification with the racial origins of Polynesians. Polynesians seemed to represent "natural man" in the purest state. In nineteenth- and early twentieth-century social-scientific studies, Polynesian origins became the subject of intense scrutiny and debate. Physical anthropologists such as Louis R. Sullivan declared Polynesians to be conditionally Caucasian....

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    2021 Mar 16

    COVID-19 and the Law: The Health Care System in the Age of COVID-19

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    This seminar series will consider the ethical, legal, regulatory, and broader social and institutional impacts that COVID-19 has had, as well as the longer-lasting effects it may have on our society. This fifth seminar in the series will focus on how the health care system has reacted and evolved during the pandemic.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost all aspects of life in the United States and around the world, disrupting the global economy as well as countless institutions. The issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic present a critical juncture for the U.S. and other...

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    2021 Mar 15

    Black and White Thinking: A Conversation with Cord Whitaker

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Committee on Medieval Studies—Online

    Author Cord Whitaker discusses his new book "Black Metaphors: How Modern Racism Emerged from Medieval Race-Thinking" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019) with Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 12

    Mayors Imagining the Just City

    1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Following the inaugural MICD Just City Mayoral Fellowship–a collaboration between the Mayors’ Institute on City Design (MICD) and Harvard GSD's Just City Lab–the seven inaugural MICD Just City Mayoral Fellows discuss how to tackle racial injustices in each of their cities through planning and design interventions.

    Learn more about and register for Mayors Imagining the Just City.

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