Events

    2022 Mar 03

    500 Years of Women Authors, Authorizing Themselves

    Repeats every week on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday until Fri Mar 11 2022 .
    10:00am to 5:00pm

    10:00am to 5:00pm
    10:00am to 5:00pm
    10:00am to 5:00pm
    10:00am to 5:00pm
    10:00am to 5:00pm
    10:00am to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Amy Lowell Room (2nd Floor), Houghton Library, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

    Let us introduce you to some of the most infamous female authors you’ve never heard of who carved out cultural spaces for themselves. Our challenge to you: Remember their names. Share their stories. Rewrite history.

    Highlights include:

    • A copy of Phillis Wheatley's collection of poems autographed by the author

    • A mysterious ownership inscription by a medieval woman named "Johanna" in a copy of Jerome's Vitas Patrum

    • Mary Wroth's copy of Xenophon's Cyropaedia, bearing her cryptic monogram...

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    2022 Mar 01

    Senior Loeb Scholar Lecture: Lesley Lokko

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The Senior Loeb Scholars program invites prominent individuals whose expertise is outside the typical disciplines of the GSD or whose practice displays a unique focus. Scholars are welcomed for a short-term residency at the School, during which they present a public lecture and engage directly with GSD students, faculty, staff, researchers, Loeb Fellows, and others. Since its inception, the program has offered the GSD community opportunities to learn from and be in discourse with...

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    2022 Feb 28

    "A Blessing" and Little Black Library at Harvard Business School: Virtual Author Chat to Celebrate Black History Month

    6:00pm to 7:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    HBS's iconic Baker Library is the largest business library in the world—and its collection expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic. For the first time in its 95-year history, Baker brought in non-business books, over 170 titles (to date) organized by Cathy Chukwulebe (MBA 2021) as part of her new non-profit, Little Black Library (LBL).

    In response to the racial and social unrest of 2020, Cathy launched Little Black Library to promote Black authors and conversations about the Black experience through books and events at libraries and other partners around the U.S.

    When...

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    2022 Feb 28

    Poetry Reading and Discussion with Camille T. Dungy

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Camille T. Dungy is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Trophic Cascade (Wesleyan University Press, 2017), winner of the Colorado Book Award, and the essay collection Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood and History (W.W. Norton, 2017), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Dungy has also edited anthologies including Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry (University of Georgia Press, 2009) and From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate...

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    2022 Feb 28

    Latinx Experiences in U.S. Schools: Voices of Students, Teachers, Teacher Educators, and Education Allies in Challenging Sociopolitical Times

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Edited by Margarita Jiménez-Silva, Ed.M.'92, Ed.D.'02 and Janine Bempechat, Ed.M.'79, Ed.D.'86, this important volume brings together voices of Latinx students, teachers, teacher educators, and education allies in Latinx communities to reveal ways in which today's sociopolitical context has given rise to politically-sanctioned hateful anti-immigrant rhetoric. Contributors—key stakeholders in the education of immigrant Latinx children, youth, and college students—share how this rhetoric has exacerbated existing systemic injustices within K-Higher Education. Understanding that teaching and...

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    2022 Feb 26

    36th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Virtual Brunch

    11:00am to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Cambridge NAACP—Online

    The 36th Annual Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Brunch will be held virtually on Saturday, February 26, 2022 at 11:00am ET. This year's theme is: "Our Beloved Community in Action: What will it take to build an anti-racist city?"

    The Cambridge Branch NAACP was among the first to adopt the celebration of Dr. King’s birthday, even before its declaration as a national holiday. For over three decades, our Annual MLK Brunch has honored the legacy of Dr. King and recognized community leaders committed to social justice and public service.

    This year, our two...

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    2022 Feb 25

    Book Talk - The Unimagined Community: Imperialism and Culture in South Vietnam

    12:00pm to 1:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Asia Center—Online

    The unimagined community proposes a reexamination of the Vietnam War from a perspective that has been largely excluded from historical accounts of the conflict, that of the South Vietnamese. Challenging the conventional view that the war was a struggle between the Vietnamese people and US imperialism, the study presents a wide-ranging investigation of South Vietnamese culture, from political philosophy and psychological warfare to popular culture and film. Beginning with a genealogy of the concept of a Vietnamese “culture,” as the latter emerged during the colonial...

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    2022 Feb 23

    Lessons from Plants

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Plants are essential to humans and the environment: they provide food, absorb carbon dioxide, produce oxygen, serve multiple ecosystem functions, and beautify landscapes. In Lessons from Plants (Harvard University Press, 2021) Beronda Montgomery invites us to appreciate our interdependence with plants and the many lessons that can be gained from a better understanding of the ways in which plants grow, adapt, and thrive.

    In this conversation with Brenda Tindal, she will address what plants can teach us about relating to one another, building diverse communities and...

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    2022 Feb 23

    Everything That Doctors Want to Know About Reproductive Rights Litigation, But Are Too Afraid to Ask

    12:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Current and past abortion legislation and court rulings have profound effects on health care providers’ ability to care for their patients. However, media coverage of abortion in the U.S. typically is not geared toward an audience of health care professionals. Health care providers are thus left on their own to grapple with questions of what they can or cannot do within the scope of ever-changing law and policy.

    This event aims to address that gap, answering the questions health care providers might have about legal doctrine around abortion and what it means for their practice...

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    2022 Feb 23

    Small Infrastructures

    9:00am to 10:00am

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Although accessible housing has been cast in many forms, accessory dwelling units (ADUs) have been a catalyst for including architects in direct policy development. For the first time, cities are directly contracting with architects to provide designs for private property through pre-approved ADU programs. These programs reflect a plurality of ideas, though without rigorous consideration for how the costs of site work, labor, materials, and energy make quality housing sustainable.

    Small Infrastructures is an exhibition of ADU designs that uses the economics of...

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    2022 Feb 17

    John Hejduk Soundings Lecture: Anthony Titus, "Rupture and Reconciliations"

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The lecture will focus on the structure of Anthony Titus's transdisciplinary practice of art and architecture. Titus will speak about a selection of several exhibitions, installations, and projects that span the past decade. Emphasis will be placed upon the processes and procedures as well as the final product of the works. Looking to explore and discover new possibilities between the spaces of architecture, sculpture, and painting Titus will share drawings, diagrams, models, and photographs of the projects.

    The conversation and exchange between these disciplines serves as a...

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    2022 Feb 17

    We Dance: An Exploration of Movement, Foodways, and Environments

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    From the world-renowned Wideman Davis Dance Company and award-winning filmmakers Ethan Payne and Brian Foster, We Dance is a love story, deconstructed and distilled into its most elemental ingredients. Dreams. Memories. Family. Environments. In this 12-minute film, Tanya Wideman-Davis and Thaddeus Davis take us from Chicago, Montgomery, and New York to the point where their lives meet and become one. Along the way, they honor and signify on Black American art, poetry, and literature.

    In this conversation with Sarah Clunis,...

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    2022 Feb 17

    ECOLOGICAL TIME IN TIME-BASED MEDIA ART

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard—Online

    Media and video art practice of the last twenty years coincided with the harrowing expansion of climate degradation. While the effects of climate change had been anticipated before 2000, they took shape ubiquitously and lethally post-2000, bringing new challenges about whether and how to imagine a future for shared life on the planet. These effects coincided also with a deeper historical understanding of how we got here, tracking the history of extractive economies and their imbrication with the forces of gender, race, colonialism, and a human-centered anthropocentricism.

    This...

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    2022 Feb 17

    Askwith Education Forums: How K–12 Schools Can Take Action on Climate Change

    1:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Climate change is one of the most pressing issues of our time—and schools have a sizable environmental impact. There are nearly 100,000 public K-12 schools in the United States occupying 2 million acres of land and producing 53,000 tons of food waste. Schools operate one of the largest mass transportation fleets in the country with 480,000 school buses, and they are one of the largest public energy consumers.

    We'll talk with national education leaders—members of an Aspen Institute bipartisan commission that recently released a...

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    2022 Feb 17

    Exporting Mayhem: Suing Gun Manufacturers in the US to Stop Violence in Mexico

    12:30pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    For many in the US, the narrative of cartel violence in Mexico may point to lawlessness and ineffective oversight. But there is another story; over the last 15 years, homicides have tripled in Mexico and as many as 90% of the guns used in drug-related violence come from the United States. While gun laws in Mexico are extremely restrictive, cartels find it easy to purchase them in a border state, such as Texas or Arizona, and then smuggle those guns across the border. The suit makes a combination of novel arguments regarding the targeted marketing of guns to cartels, the lack of effective...

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    2022 Feb 16

    Towards Health Equity: Dismantling Racist Barriers for Black Healthcare Students

    6:00pm to 7:30pm

    Location: 

    Center for Bioethics, Harvard Medical School—Online

    Black students have played a pivotal role in pioneering programs and in pushing their institutions to act in ways that move towards health equity. This student-led session will illuminate diverse perspectives, building from understanding history, about ways institutions can enact a clear “action agenda”, including concrete opportunities and responsibilities, through which everyone concerned about these issues can see ways to promote action to accelerate long-overdue progress.

    ...

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    2022 Feb 16

    Book Talk: Civic Education in the Age of Mass Migration

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Immigration Initiative at Harvard—Online

    Dr. Angela M. Banks will discuss her recent book Civic Education in the Age of Mass Migration: Implications for Theory and Practice.

    Angela M. Banks is a legal scholar specializing in membership and belonging in democratic societies. She is the Charles J. Merriam Distinguished Professor of law at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is the author of...

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    2022 Feb 16

    Heels at Work: Do Symbols of Professionalism Imbued with Femininity Offer Women a Leg Up or Create an Unequal Footing for Them in the Workplace?

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School, Program on Negotiation—Online

    When Nicola Thorp reported for a white-collar job at the London office of PricewaterhouseCoopers in 2016, she was told to switch from her flat footwear to two- to four-inch heels to comply with the company’s official dress-code policy for female employees. Thorp’s refusal to oblige sparked an international debate regarding whether it was appropriate to mandate female employees to wear heels as a part of their professional attire. Currently, in several countries, including the US, women in white-collar jobs are often expected to, or advised to, wear closed-toe heels in neutral colors to...

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    2022 Feb 16

    Cohort Effects and Adolescent Mental Health Trends

    11:00am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health—Online

    Adolescent mental health in the United Stated has shown unprecedent changes over recent years. A key issue in attempting to understand trends over time in in adolescent’s mental health symptoms is the extent to which trends reflect age, period, or cohort effects. Dr. Katherine Keyes will join us in the next Population Mental Health forum to discuss whether mental health problems in adolescents are really on in the increase, drawing on her important research in this area.

    ...

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