Events

    The Last Common Ancestor

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    The last common ancestor of chimpanzees and modern humans is believed to have evolved in Africa six to eight million years ago. Finding fossil apes and hominins—extinct members of the human lineage—from this period has been challenging. Ashley Hammond will discuss her approach to identifying key evolutionary adaptations of this last common ancestor using 3D technology, analyses of known fossils, and field research at six-million-year-old sites in Kenya. Hammond’s research aims to clarify the origins of bipedality, a key adaptation in human evolution.

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    Members: Discover Oceania with Ingrid Ahlgren

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    Join us for a casual evening of conversation with the Peabody Museum’s Curator of Oceanic Collections. Ingrid Ahlgren stewards one of the largest and most historically significant collections in the U.S. from the Pacific Islands, Australia, and Aotearoa/New Zealand. Hear her share some of her recent work, including the exhibit Uncovering Pacific Pasts and the important roles that Harvard University and the state of Massachusetts have played in the history of Oceania. Ingrid will also discuss her upcoming collaboration with Pacific Islanders living in Utah.

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    Ilze and Heinrich Wolff, “Homage and Refusal”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Wolff is a design studio concerned with developing an architectural practice of consequence through the mediums of design, advocacy, research and documentation. The Wolff team is led by Ilze & Heinrich Wolff who work collaboratively with a group of highly skilled, committed and engaged architects, creative practitioners and administrators.

    Learn more about and RSVP for Ilze and...

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    The History of Structural Racism in Charlottesville: Legally-Enforced Segregation and Its Impact on Health

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    Using Charlottesville as a case study, Dayna Bowen Matthew, JD, PhD, Dean and Harold H. Greene Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School, explores the theory, mechanisms, and impact on health of legally-mandated residential segregation and how we can identify and redress historical inequities.

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    Latinx Modernism and the Spirit of Latinoamericanismo

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    John Alba Cutler, associate professor of English and Latinx studies at Northwestern University, is working on a new book examining the prodigious literary archive of early-20th-century Spanish-language newspapers in the United States. Newspapers in Latinx communities from New York to San Diego published tens of thousands of poems, short stories, chronicles, and serialized novels. These works show how Latinx communities grappled with the collision of Latin American and US modernities long before the advent of what we think of as “modern” Latinx literature.

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    Senior Loeb Scholar Lecture: Walter Hood

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The Senior Loeb Scholars program invites prominent individuals whose expertise is outside the typical disciplines of the GSD or whose practice displays a unique focus. Scholars are welcomed for a short-term residency at the School, during which they present a public lecture, workshops, and other engagements. Since its inception, the program has offered the GSD community opportunities to learn from and engage with visionary designers, scholars, and thought leaders.

    Walter Hood is the Spring 2021 Senior Loeb Scholar. Hood joins a cohort of previous Senior Loeb Scholars, which...

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    Art Talk Live: Picturing the Modern Home—Lucia Moholy’s Bauhaus Living Room

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In 1920s Germany, the progressive Bauhaus school of art, architecture, and design sought to create art, objects, and environments that would revolutionize everyday life. This talk will focus on Lucia Moholy’s carefully constructed photograph of her own living room in one of the newly built Bauhaus faculty residences. In addition to providing housing, the home served as an important publicity tool, showcasing Walter Gropius’s architecture as well as the Bauhaus products with which it was meticulously furnished.

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    The COVID “Next Normal”: Lessons from the NBA Bubble and Vaccine Modeling

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    As the coronavirus pandemic enters a new phase, science that can guide vaccination prioritization and business’ return-to-work strategies are more important than ever. In this webinar, we will explore the experience of the NBA bubble, in which players were sequestered at the Walt Disney World Resort. Data from this longitudinal testing program has important implications for our understanding of the natural history of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the utility of frequent testing strategies. In addition, we will discuss modeling studies that compare different...

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    Kate Thomas, “Lesbian Arcadia: Desire and Design in the Fin-de-Siècle Garden”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    At the end of the nineteenth century, British and American lesbian artists settled around Florence, Italy, renovating neglected Renaissance estates. Contemporary accounts describe the hillside region as colonized by a “cult of women.” These women restored, refashioned and theorized gardens as places of queerly mythic erotic encounter.

    In this lecture Professor Thomas will explore how design features such as nymphaeums, water parterres, secret gardens, grottos and boscos provided both refuge and open-air expression for lesbian subjectivity. Remembering that the first documented...

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    The Politics of Health Policy: Integrating Racial Justice into Health Care and Clinical Research

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    What are political determinants of health? How have they driven inequities in the U.S. health care system? Daniel Dawes, JD, director of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute Morehouse School of Medicine, shares an inclusive approach to addressing health issues impacting the most vulnerable populations in an increasingly complex...

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    The Popularization of Doubt: Scientific Literacy & Alternative Forms of Knowledge in the Soviet Union after World War II

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Alexey Golubev, assistant professor of Russian history and digital humanities at the University of Houston, is working on a new book project: a history of Soviet efforts to produce mass scientific literacy after World War II, when tens and later hundreds of thousands of members of the Soviet intelligentsia were recruited to communicate scientific knowledge to the public through popular science lectures, publications, public experiments and debates, and television shows.

    This mass scientific literacy campaign resulted in a diverse and autonomous network of people and ideas in...

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    COVID-19 and the Law: What COVID-19 Teaches Us About Health Justice and the Path Forward

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost all aspects of life in the United States and around the world, disrupting the global economy as well as countless institutions. The issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic present a critical juncture for the U.S. and other countries around the world. Our actions now have the potential to shape responses to future pandemics, and to ensure institutions serve all of our populations.

    How have our institutions, including the structure of our health care system and its attendant regulations, affected the evolution of the pandemic? What...

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    I Heart Science: Faraway Worlds

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Break out of the winter doldrums and welcome Harvard science into your home with the all-virtual I Heart Science festival lasting from Friday, February 12 to Monday, February 15. This day’s “Faraway Worlds” theme looks at exploration of places hard to get to such as space, deep oceans, and the distant past.

    During the live webinar, starting at 1:00 pm ET, meet Harvard researchers studying how we study the sun and what we hope to learn from missions to Mars.

    At home, try your hand at investigating light, explore what we know about coelacanths and hear the story...

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    I Heart Science: Love the Earth

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Break out of the winter doldrums and welcome Harvard science into your home with the all-virtual I Heart Science festival lasting from Friday, February 12 to Monday, February 15. This day’s “Love the Earth” theme looks at how we are taking care of our planet and the geology that makes it all possible.

    During the live webinar, starting at 1:00 pm ET, meet Harvard researchers studying how we can design batteries large enough to power a building and investigate what it takes to save endangered species.

    At home, try your hand at growing crystals, modeling volcanos, and...

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    I Heart Science: Tiny Creatures

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Break out of the winter doldrums and welcome Harvard science into your home with the all-virtual I Heart Science festival lasting from Friday, February 12 to Monday, February 15. This day’s “Tiny Creatures” theme looks at bacteria, viruses, and other microbial creatures.

    During the live webinar, starting at 1:00 pm ET, meet live tardigrades, also known as water bears. Watch recorded videos featuring Harvard scientists who study bacterial resistance, ways to test for viruses, and how bacteria grow.

    At home, try your hand at making a water-drop microscope, comparing...

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    I Heart Science: Incredible Evolution

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Break out of the winter doldrums and welcome Harvard science into your home with the all-virtual I heart Science festival lasting from Friday, February 12 to Monday, February 15. Today’s “Incredible Evolution” theme looks at ways that animals have adapted to their environments.

    During the live webinar, starting at 1pm ET, meet Harvard researchers studying how brains evolve and how stress can enhance performance.

    At home, watch recorded videos by Harvard scientists studying mice behavior or try your hand at comparing bone structures, collecting...

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    How Can a University Move from Good to Great?

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    America and various other countries have many ‘pretty good’ colleges and universities. Yet few of them can really be called great. At a time of much disruption and upheaval, what are four or five big ideas that can help leaders of colleges and universities push their institutions from ‘pretty good’ to become ‘genuinely outstanding.’ In this presentation and discussion, Richard Light will emphasize concrete suggestions that are either no-cost or very low cost for a campus to actually implement. He also will share two brief, case studies of universities that have successfully moved from ‘...

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    Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation

    Location: 

    Harvard Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History—Online

    Join a post-election conversation with Latosha Brown, Black Voters Matter) and Warren Center American Democracy Fellow. 

    Moderated by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy, HKS; Suzanne Young Murray Professor, Radcliffe.

    Learn more and RSVP for Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation.

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