Events

    2020 Oct 13

    Addressing Homelessness: What Can (and Can’t) Architecture Do?

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In the 20th Annual John T. Dunlop Lecture, presented by the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, Michael Maltzan will discuss his work with the Skid Row Housing Trust and what it suggests about the ways in which architecture and other design professions can help address problems of housing affordability and homelessness. After the lecture, Mike Alvidrez, CEO Emeritus of the Skid Row...

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    2020 Oct 09

    Future of Education: Global Voices—to Create Welcoming Communities

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education, Askwith Forums—Online

    In a context of disruption and uncertainty, how can we fulfill our collective responsibility to ensure that all young people receive a high-quality and inclusive education? How can schools — and the communities around them — create welcoming spaces of belonging, even amid isolationism, both politically and pandemically?

    Join us for “Future of Education: Global Voices — to Create Welcoming Communities,” a discussion about the interconnected challenges of listening, belonging, and collective responsibility when it comes to educating and nurturing young people today. Big ideas...

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    2020 Oct 08

    The Enduring Legacy of Slavery and Racism in the North

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Although Massachusetts formally abolished slavery in 1783, the visible and invisible presence of slavery continued in the Commonwealth and throughout New England well into the 19th century. Harvard professor Louis Agassiz’s theory about human origins is but one example of the continued presence and institutionalization of racism in the North.

    Taking as a starting point the new book To Make Their Own Way in the World: The Enduring Legacy of the Zealy Daguerreotypes, this panel of experts will examine the role and impact of slavery in the North and discuss the influence...

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    2020 Oct 08

    The Tale of Two Californias: “Averages Are No Consolation to Those Who Have Been Left Behind”

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health—Online

    The COVID-19 pandemic in the United States has disproportionately affected communities of color, people living in poverty, and other marginalized groups. Speakers will explore how COVID-19 exposure risk, the quality of COVID-19-specific medical care, and social determinants of health contribute to disparate trends in COVID-19 infection and mortality seen in the United States. Speakers will be asked to comment on the major public health needs, such as data collection and studies performed, that are required to support a more equitable pandemic response.

    Dr. Bibbins-Domingo is a...

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    2020 Oct 07

    From the Hands of the Makers

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    From 1886 to 1936, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka applied their artistic talents and knowledge of natural history to create an exquisite collection of glass models of plants to support the botanical education of Harvard students and the public. This program will explore the history, conservation, and relevance of the Glass Flowers in the twenty-first century and introduce the publication Glass Flowers: Marvels of Art and Science at Harvard, a compendium of new photographs that captures the beauty and magnificent detail of the models.

    ...

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    2020 Oct 06

    Books@Baker with Ashley Whillans, author of "Time Smart"

    3:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    Four out of five adults report feeling that they have too much to do and not enough time to do it, research shows. These "time-poor" people experience less joy each day, laugh less often, and are less healthy—and they are also less productive. How can we escape the time traps that can consume our days and make us miserable?

    In the new book Time Smart: How to Reclaim Your Time and Live a Happier Life, author and Harvard Business School Professor Ashley Whillans says we need to consciously take steps to improve our "time affluence." The book provides research-...

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    2020 Oct 06

    Will COVID-19 Curtail European-Eurasian Integration?

    9:30am to 10:30am

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    A panel of scholars from China, Germany, Kazakhstan, and the US will explore the impact of COVID-19 on transcontinental connectivity from the perspective of key countries and regions in the Belt and Road Initiative: Germany, Hungary, Greece, Belarus, Russia and Central Asia. Will the pandemic curtail European-Eurasian integration and Chinese influence? Or will it represent a critical juncture that relaxes political constraints and hastens economic interdependence?

    ...

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    2020 Oct 01

    On Account of Sex (1920)

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 did not "give" women the vote. Rather, it established a negative: that the right to vote could not be abridged on account of sex alone. This session brings together diverse participants who will each illuminate one facet of women’s political history at this key transitional moment. Together, participants will emphasize the radical achievement of the amendment, exploring the full implications of what it meant to remove sex as a barrier to voting, which resulted in the largest-ever one-time expansion of the electorate and mobilized a...

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    2020 Oct 01

    Tracking the Unequal Burden of COVID-19 in the United States

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health—Online

     

    The COVID-19 pandemic in the United States has disproportionately affected communities of color, people living in poverty, and other marginalized groups. Speakers will explore how COVID-19 exposure risk, the quality of COVID-19-specific medical care, and social determinants of health contribute to disparate trends in COVID-19 infection and mortality seen in the United States. Speakers will be asked to comment on the major public health needs, such as data collection and studies performed, that...

    Read more about Tracking the Unequal Burden of COVID-19 in the United States
    2020 Oct 01

    What Studying Putin’s Russia Can Teach Us about the United States: Masculinity, Misogyny, and U.S. Elections in the Trump Era

    12:30pm to 1:45pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    Vladimir Putin has long been known for his macho displays, and Donald Trump for his misogynist pronouncements. In both the U.S. and Russia, machismo and misogyny play fundamental roles in politics; the former is used to legitimize particular politicians as strong leaders, and the latter to undermine opponents as weak. In their lecture, while drawing parallels to Russia, Professors Robert Boatright and Valerie Sperling will focus on their new book about masculinity and misogyny in the U.S. political context, exploring how Donald Trump’s misogyny in the 2016 presidential race changed the...

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    2020 Sep 23

    Gutman Library Book Talk: Common-Sense Evidence: The Education Leader’s Guide to Using Data and Research

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Graduate School of Education

    Written by two leading experts in education research and policy, Common-Sense Evidence is a concise, accessible guide that helps education leaders find and interpret data and research, and then put that knowledge into action.

    Moderated by: Dr. Bridget Terry Long, Dean and Saris Professor of Education and Economics at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

    The panel discussion will feature:

    • Carrie Conaway, one of the book's authors and a senior lecturer on education at HGSE
    • Sonja Santelises, CEO of...
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    2020 Sep 21

    Exhibition Opening and Artist Talk: Accompanied

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    The artists Marilyn Pappas and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman met at Radcliffe’s Bunting Institute in the 1980s. Decades later, their sustained friendship has led them to work in adjoining studios and teach generations of artists.

    In this exhibition-opening discussion, Pappas and Slosburg-Ackerman will reflect on how their artistic practices have been shaped by friendship and the ways in which women’s art is shaped by the conditions of its making. Pappas and Slosburg-Ackerman will be joined in conversation by author Maggie Doherty.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 21

    Understanding the Role of Race in Health

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Law School, The Petrie-Flom Center

    Structural racism pervades all facets of society, from education, to housing, to law enforcement. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the health disparities that result from this systemic and structural racism.

    The Petrie-Flom Center has asked leading scholars in law, public health, history, sociology, and other fields to explore these issues for a digital symposium on the Bill of Health blog. The focus of the symposium is to unpack how critical race theories and other strands of racial justice scholarship can inform health care, public health, and other areas of law to...

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    2020 Sep 17

    Reconstructing the Polity (1870)

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    The reconstruction of the American polity after the Civil War—in particular, the adoption of the 15th Amendment in 1870—marked a key moment in the long history of the 19th Amendment, women’s political mobilization, and the contested boundaries of United States citizenship.

    During the campaign for the 15th Amendment, and the campaign of racial terror that accompanied its passage, Black women mobilized to defend themselves and their communities, innovating ideas and strategies that would reshape the women’s suffrage movement. As federal troops moved from the South to the West,...

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    2020 Sep 17

    COVID-19 and the Stakes for Democracy in South America

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Law School, The Petrie-Flom Center

    The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a health crisis, or even an economic crisis, but also a critical inflection point for democracy and the rule of law. The pandemic has presented a test for the legitimacy of democratic governance, and perhaps nowhere are the stakes higher than in Latin America, which as of August 5, as a region had the world’s highest death toll per population.

    Even before the pandemic, the region as a whole faced staggering levels of social inequality...

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    2020 Sep 14

    Unleashing the Potential of Those You Lead

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Business School

    Join the Harvard Business School for a conversation with Frances Frei and Anne Morriss, authors of Unleashed: The Unapologetic Leader's Guide to Empowering Everyone Around You.

    Leadership isn't easy. It takes grit, courage, and vision, among other things, that can be hard to come by on your toughest days. When leaders and aspiring leaders seek out advice, they're often told to try harder. Dig deeper. Look in the mirror and own your natural-born strengths and fix any real or perceived career-limiting deficiencies.

    Frances Frei argues that this...

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    2020 Sep 10

    Getting Out the BIPOC Vote: Digital Strategies to Build Power

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Ash Center

    Activists and practitioners were already preparing for a tumultuous election year before the COVID-19 pandemic hit our shores. Now, the months ahead present immense challenges—and opportunities—for redefining how civic engagement is practiced for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities.

    Join the Harvard Kennedy School for a timely discussion with leading practitioners who are effectively integrating digital strategies with authentic power-building while navigating a never-before-seen civic environment. All share a mission of giving real agency to vulnerable...

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    2020 Aug 26

    Voting Matters: Origin Stories: Keynote Address (1848)

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

    Join the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study for the beginning of the series Voting Matters: Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment with a keynote address by the historian Martha S. Jones, who will root the generations-long movement for women’s suffrage in the activism of African American women from the 1830s. Jones will explore the tangled intersections of gender and race in the battle for the ballot while considering the evolution of birthright citizenship, more broadly, as itself a gendered origins story about constituting the American people.

    ...

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    2020 Aug 15

    Visit an Artist and Demonstration - Christina Erives

    2:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Join us for a virtual field trip to an artist's studio! We will visit contemporary ceramic artists for a guided tour of their space, a demo of their process, and discussion about their work and how it has progressed throughout their career. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and participate in the discussion.

    This week, we visit the studio of sculptor Christina Erives! Christina believes that ceramics as material has permanence, it is one of the ways we were able to learn about ancient...

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    2020 Aug 14

    Visit an Artist - Salvador Jiménez-Flores

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Join us for a virtual field trip to an artist's studio! We will visit contemporary ceramic artists for a guided tour of their space, a discussion about their process, and discussion about their work and how it has progressed throughout their career. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and participate in the discussion.

    This week we travel to Chicago to visit former Harvard Ceramics Program Artist-in-Residence (2015-2017) Salvador Jiménez-Flores. We are looking forward to catching up with...

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