Events

    2020 Oct 22

    National Fossil Day

    9:00am to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Celebrate National Fossil Day—a celebration organized by the National Park Service—by taking a closer look at museum fossils with Harvard paleontologists. What can we see on ancient seafloors? How do modern animals help us understand extinct animals? What fossils still amaze scientists? What is it like to be a practicing paleontologist? Bring your curiosity and questions to this online event for all ages!

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    2020 Oct 15

    Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    The first person who will set foot on Mars is alive right now. We believe this, but even if we're wrong we know the first crew to arrive there will look nothing like the ones that landed on the Moon fifty years ago.

    Our world has changed for the better, and ASTRONAUTS tells the story of the women who built this better world. The main character and narrator is Mary Cleave, an astronaut you may not have heard of. It's not because so many people have been to space; only a few hundred have! It’s because this graphic novel isn’t about fame. No astronaut you'll ever meet took the...

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    2020 Oct 14

    Wonderful Cambrian Beasts

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Earth is home to a vast diversity of organisms that collectively define the modern biosphere. How did this diversity come to be? Javier Ortega-Hernández will discuss his approach to answering this question by studying organisms that lived more than half a billion years ago in the Cambrian Period (485–541 million years ago). By focusing on the earliest-known animals—some of the most versatile to ever exist—Ortega-Hernández aims to reconstruct the early evolutionary history of major animal groups and contribute to our understanding of Earth’s biodiversity.

    ...

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    2020 Oct 05

    Gutman Library Book Talk: Black, Brown, Bruised: How Racialized STEM Education Stifles Innovation

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Gutman Library—Online

    Drawing on narratives from hundreds of Black, Latinx, and Indigenous individuals, Ebony Omotola McGee examines the experiences of underrepresented racially minoritized students and faculty members who have succeeded in STEM. Based on this extensive research, McGee advocates for structural and institutional changes to address racial discrimination, stereotyping, and hostile environments in an effort to make the field more inclusive.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 17

    Observatory Night: What Stars Are Made Of

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    Join the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian for a virtual Public Observatory Night with guest lecturer Donavan Moore, author of "What Stars Are Made Of: The Life of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin."

    It was not easy being a woman of ambition in early twentieth-century England, much less one who wished to be a scientist. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin overcame prodigious obstacles to become a woman of many firsts: the first to receive a PhD in astronomy from Radcliffe College, the first promoted to full professor at Harvard, the first to head a department there. And, in what...

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    2020 Sep 07

    2020 Science and Cooking Lecture Series

    Repeats every week every Monday until Mon Nov 09 2020 except Mon Oct 05 2020.
    3:00pm

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    Location: 

    Online—Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences

    This year’s Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series is a celebration of border-blurring, culinary crossovers, from Caribbean-influenced French and Italian cuisine to a Thai take on traditional Indian recipes. And with a remote format via Zoom, this 11th iteration of the lecture series gives viewers a front-row seat to watch some of the world’s best chefs showcase unexpected flavors and unique techniques.

    The lectures pair Harvard professors with celebrated food experts...

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    2020 Sep 04

    Harvard Science Book Talk: Rita Colwell, "A Lab of One's Own: One Woman's Personal Journey Through Sexism in Science"

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Division of Science, Cabot Science Library, and Harvard Book Store

    Rita Colwell, a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation, will talk about her new book, A Lab of One's Own: One Woman's Personal Journey Through Sexism in Science. The book is a memoir-manifesto about the entrenched sexism in science, the elaborate detours women have taken to bypass the problem, and how to fix the system.

    ...

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    2020 Aug 19

    Using the Pandemic Recovery to Spur the Clean Transition

    9:00am to 10:00am

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center

    In this webinar, Rachel Kyte (Dean, Fletcher School, Tufts University) will discuss a potential green recovery from the pandemic—how recovery efforts might be leveraged to accelerate the transition to a clean and sustainable energy system—in the United States and globally.

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    2020 Jul 22

    Digital Health Apps: Evidence, Reimbursement and Outcomes

    12:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online event

    Apps for health, wellness and disease management are increasingly common across the healthcare ecosystem. Health systems, biotech and pharma, payers and pharmacy benefits managers are just a few of the industry sectors actively using digital tools to try to improve care delivery and outcomes.

    This webinar will discuss emerging lessons and concepts from this space. What is the practical significance of the designation “digital therapeutic?” What are the current regulatory pathways? How does reimbursement actually work? Megan Jones Bell, MD, Chief Science Officer for Headspace,...

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    2020 Jul 14

    Harvard Science Book Talk: Sarah Stewart Johnson, "The Sirens of Mars"

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard FAS Division of Science—Online

    Mars was once similar to Earth, but today there are no rivers, no lakes, no oceans. Coated in red dust, the terrain is bewilderingly empty. And yet multiple spacecraft are circling Mars, sweeping over Terra Sabaea, Syrtis Major, the dunes of Elysium, and Mare Sirenum—on the brink, perhaps, of a staggering find, one that would inspire humankind as much as any discovery in the history of modern science.

    In her beautifully observed, deeply personal book, The Sirens of Mars: Searching for Life on Another World, Georgetown scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson tells the story of...

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    2020 Jul 09

    Europe's Green Recovery

    9:00am to 10:00am

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    Mauro Petriccione (Director-General for Climate Action, European Commission) will discuss approaches to ensuring that Europe’s economic-recovery packages advance a green agenda—reduced greenhouse-gas emissions, reduced air and water pollution, and long-term sustainable development on the basis of a circular economy.

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    2020 Jun 17

    The Bridge: Natural Gas in a Redivided Europe

    12:30pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Three decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the breakup of the Soviet empire, the West faces a new era of East-West tensions. Any vision of a modern Russia integrated into the world economy and aligned in peaceful partnership with a reunited Europe has abruptly vanished. Two opposing narratives vie to explain the strategic future of Europe, one geopolitical and one economic, and both center on the same resource: natural gas. In The Bridge, Thane Gustafson, an expert on Russian oil and gas, argues that the political rivalries that capture the lions share of media attention...

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    2020 May 13

    Webinar: China's Air Quality and Climate Change: The Known and the Unknown

    12:30pm to 1:45pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Chris Nielsen is the executive director of the Harvard-China Project on Energy, Economy and Environment. Working with faculty at collaborating Chinese universities and across the schools of Harvard, he has managed and developed the interdisciplinary China Project from its inception.

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    2020 May 05

    Central Asian Economies and COVID-19: Bracing for Crisis

    10:00am

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Difficult times are upon us. Central Asian states are dealing with the outbreak of COVID-19 and bracing for the second “tsunami wave” – the impact of the pandemic on their economies.  With borders sealed, supply chain interrupted, prices on natural resources going down, and businesses forced to scale down or close, the unprecedented crisis requires strong and smart policies. Join Program Director Nargis Kassenova in conversation with Christian Josz, IMF Mission Chief for the Kyrgyz Republic, Roman Mogilevskii, Associate Director of the University of Central Asia Institute of Public...

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    2020 Mar 03

    Who Discovered Evolution?

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Charles Darwin is commonly cited as the person who “discovered” evolution. But, the historical record shows that roughly seventy different individuals published work on the topic of evolution between 1748 and 1859, the year that Darwin published On the Origin of Species. These early thinkers, now almost entirely forgotten, included biologists, geologists, horticulturists, physicians, clergymen, atheists, philosophers, teachers, and poets.

    William Friedman will discuss the ideas of these pre-Darwinian evolutionists, place Darwin in a broader historical context, and...

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    2020 Feb 27

    The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the tenth and eleventh centuries. The causes continue to be investigated and debated. Paleoenvironmental research over the past twenty years has revealed that the demise coincided with a prolonged, intensive drought that extended across the region, providing compelling evidence that climate change played a key role in the collapse of the Maya. Billie Turner will examine this evidence and the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 26

    Olfaction in Science and Society

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    The sense of smell plays a critical role in human behavior, from warning us of potential dangers to attracting us to certain foods, places, and people. Harvard scientists Catherine Dulac and Venkatesh Murthy study the molecules, cells, and brain circuits that underlie olfaction and the social behaviors that aromas can elicit. In this program, they will engage in a conversation with internationally recognized olfactive expert Dawn Goldworm to discuss how neurobiological research on olfaction relates to our everyday experiences.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 20

    Infectious Cancers in Tasmanian Devils

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The Tasmanian devil is the world’s largest living carnivorous marsupial. This species was once abundant in Australia, but today is only found on the island of Tasmania, where it is at risk of extinction due to two rare, contagious cancers. Mark Margres will discuss how this species is adapting in response to these diseases, whether there is any hope for the Tasmanian devil to avoid extinction, and what can be learned about human cancers from studying the disease in other animal species.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 11

    What Makes Chocolate "Good?"

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The social and environmental values underlying artisanal chocolate production have become increasingly important in its marketing. Good taste is paramount, of course, but how does one measure "social goodness," and what additional value does it add for the consumer? Chocolate makers’ interests often diverge from those of cacao producers, and industry stakeholders have not clearly addressed these concerns. Carla Martin will examine the cacao-chocolate industry and highlight the often conflicting goals that can create gaps in social and environmental responsibility.

    A...

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