Events

    2019 Apr 05

    Exhibition: "Fighting Pencil" vs. the Bureaucrat, Satirical Posters from the Soviet Union

    Repeats every day until Sun Apr 21 2019 .
    9:00am to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Fisher Family Commons, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    By the 1960’s and 1970’s, outrageous practices in Soviet bureaucracy flourished. Poor planning, endless paper-pushing, redundancy and shirking, bribery, embezzlement, phony reporting, and cover-ups at all levels of the centralized economy had become the norm. The results included shoddy construction, inefficient farming methods, empty store shelves, environmental pollution, and a decidedly uncivil civil service.

    To combat these ills, the government enlisted the help of cartoonists and poets from the Fighting Pencil, a Leningrad-based artists’ collective. Borrowing from the...

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    Film Screening & Discussion: Women of the Gulag

    Location: 

    CGIS South, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    The documentary film Women of the Gulag tells the compelling and tragic stories of six women as last survivors of the Gulag. Women of the Gulag features six women in their eighties and nineties as they tell their stories while going about their daily lives in remote villages in the Ural Mountains, in break-away Sukhumi, and in the Moscow suburbs. This film was short-listed for the Academy Award Documentary Short Subject nomination, 2019.

    Following the film, Professor Terry Martin will moderate a conversation with Marianna Yoravskaya, the...

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    Countering Authoritarianism and Nationalism: Russia Needs Multiple Liberal Leaders

    Location: 

    Center for Government and International Studies South Building, Room S354, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Join us at the Center for Government and International Studies for a comparative politics seminar, "Countering Authoritarianism and Nationalism: Russia Needs Multiple Liberal Leaders," with speaker Zhanna Nemtsova.

    After studying economics at the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), Zhanna Nemtsova pursued a career in journalism at the Russian business news channel RBC TV, where she worked as a host and interviewed political and business figures. Following the assassination of her father, political opposition leader and Putin-critic Boris Nemtsov in...

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    Are Koreans Human? A Lecture with Best-Selling Author Min Jin Lee

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Who are the modern Koreans, and what do they care about? Koreans have experienced colonialism, diaspora, war, national division, immigration, and a persistent nuclear threat—and yet, they have achieved extraordinary gains in their homelands and elsewhere. Min Jin Lee, the author of the novels Free Food for Millionaires and Pachinko who is working on the third novel of The Koreans trilogy, will explore the will of Koreans to survive and flourish as global citizens, their enduring faith in education, and the costs of such a quest and what it may mean...

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    Bear at the Border: Russian Foreign Policy in Europe

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S354, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Russia has become increasingly assertive on the world stage, particularly in its intent to maintain a sphere of influence in Eurasia and Eastern Europe. More recently, Moscow has also become comfortable with interfering in Western Europe through asymmetric means. What is the Russian government’s strategy toward Europe? What are the levers of influence at the Kremlin's disposal and how does it wield them in Eastern vs Western Europe? At this seminar, Dr. Busygina and Dr. Polyakova will discuss the opportunities and constraints facing Russia with a specific look at Western Europe and...

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    Lecture and Book Signing: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    After World War II, evolutionary scientists began rethinking their views on humanity’s past. What if human history was not merely a cooperative struggle against a harsh environment? What if violence and war were normal states of existence, punctuated by brief moments of peace? These are the questions Erika Lorraine Milam explores in her new book, Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America. She will discuss how anthropologists and zoologists during the Cold-War era struggled to reconcile humanity’s triumph as a species with the possibility that this...

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    Origins of the Green Revolution: Hybrid Seeds, Hunger, and Mexico-India Cooperation

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University

    As a devastating famine gripped India and Pakistan in 1966, a cargo of hybrid wheat seeds from Mexico arrived one fateful day on India’s coast. The seeds were first planted across the Punjab region using new...

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    Photographing Tutankhamun: How the Camera Helped Create “King Tut”

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Christina Riggs, Professor of the History of Art and Archaeology, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

    When Howard Carter found the sealed entrance to Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, he secured the services of archaeological photographer Harry Burton to document the site. Over the course of ten years, Burton produced more than 3,000 glass negatives of the tomb, its contents, and the many people—including Egyptian men, women, and children—who participated in the excavation. Christina Riggs will discuss how Burton’s photography helped create “King Tut” at a...

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    Schlesinger 75th Anniversary Celebration

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA

    In this performance and discussion, “The Suffragists” captures the power and passion of American women’s fight for the vote through song. Created by the acclaimed singer-songwriter Shaina Taub, the musical tells the story of the last decade of the struggle through the rivalry between Carrie Chapman Catt and Alice Paul. Taub’s musical gives voice to these women in ways that powerfully resonate in today’s political landscape. The performance will be followed by a multidisciplinary panel discussion.

    ...

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    The First 25 Years: How the Arboretum Became the Arboretum

    Location: 

    Centre Street Gate, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    The Arnold Arboretum did not come into existence full-formed, but had a long adolescence before it (literally) blossomed at 50. Our first director, Charles Sargent, prepared a 50-year report in 1922, before the end of his own 54-year tenure. But, what about the first 25 years? We don't have a 25-year report, however, we do have photos and the engaging stories from that time.

    Join our docent to hear those stories, as she takes you on a timeline...

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    Peters Hill: The Other End of the Arboretum

    Location: 

    Peters Hill Gate, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    Join our docent for a tour of the other end of the Arnold Arboretum, the southern end. Peters Hill became part of the Arboretum in 1894 and continues to charm with its special character, collections, and history. In autumn, the amazing view from the summit takes on a new tapestry of color, spreading out in the landscape below you. Learn the history of the land, along with information on the woody plants located here, like the collection of crabapples fruiting in many colors on the northern slope.

    Free but registration requested.

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    Archaeology Live: Harvard College Life in Colonial Times

    Location: 

    Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA

    Peer into an active archaeological excavation and learn about the oldest section of North America’s first college, founded in 1636. Harvard archaeology students will answer your questions, demonstrate archaeological methods, and display recent finds from the seventeenth century that reflect how Harvard College students—centuries ago—ate, dressed, and amused themselves, among other experiences. Drop by any time during this 90-minute event. The site is in Harvard Yard, steps away...

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