Events

    Right Where We Belong: How Refugee Teachers and Students Are Changing the Future of Education

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Half of the world’s 26 million refugees are children. Their formal education is disrupted, and their lives are too often dominated by exclusion and uncertainty about what the future holds. Even kids who have the opportunity to attend school face enormous challenges, as they struggle to integrate into unfamiliar societies and educational environments.

    It turns out that policymakers, activists, and educators have a lot to learn from displaced children and teachers. Their stories point the way to better futures for refugee students and inspire us to reimagine education broadly,...

    Read more about Right Where We Belong: How Refugee Teachers and Students Are Changing the Future of Education

    Virtual Student Guide Tour: Painting’s Punchlines, with Sophia Clark

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In this tour, Sophia Clark ’23 explores the varied means and ends of humor in three works of art that, at first glance, may not seem funny. They are Mervin Jules’s 1937 painting The Art Lover; Charles Bird King’s 1830 painting The Vanity of the Artist’s Dream; and the Archaic Greek Eye cup: Athena (c. 530 BCE), which gives drinkers a different face...

    Read more about Virtual Student Guide Tour: Painting’s Punchlines, with Sophia Clark

    Manifest: Thirteen Colonies

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Manifest: Thirteen Colonies is a photographic project and journey through the repositories of African American material culture found in libraries, museums, and archives of the original thirteen English colonies. Conceived by photographer Wendel White, this project is a personal, selective reliquary of the remarkable evidence of Black agency and racial oppression stored in public and private collections.

    In this program, White will discuss his approach to finding, selecting, and photographing artifacts—from rare singular objects, to more quotidian materials—and highlight their...

    Read more about Manifest: Thirteen Colonies

    Black Music and the American University: Eileen Southern's Story

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Join us for the second of two one-hour webinars exploring the legacy of Eileen Southern, author of “The Music of Black Americans: A History” and founder and editor of “The Black Perspective in Music.” In 1976, Eileen Southern (1920–2002) became the first African American woman tenured in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). She was central in developing the Department of Afro-American Studies (now African and African American Studies), serving as an early chair, and was on the faculty of the Department of Music, where she taught courses on Black music and Renaissance musical...

    Read more about Black Music and the American University: Eileen Southern's Story

    Reimagining Our Radical Roots

    Location: 

    Online or at Harvard Kennedy School, 79 John F. Kennedy St., Cambridge,

    Join us for a two-day convening to celebrate the bold life and continuing legacy of William Monroe Trotter- a Harvard University alumnus who advanced the cause of civil rights and social justice. The convening will to introduce attendees to Trotter’s legacy and provide an opportunity for academics, activists and artists to consider how Trotter’s radical activism can address critical issues facing us today, and offer opportunities to hear from distinguished professors and practitioners.

    ...

    Read more about Reimagining Our Radical Roots

    Exploring Humanity's Technological Origins

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Human evolutionary scholars have long assumed that the earliest stone tools were made by members of the genus Homo, approximately 2.4–2.3 million years ago, and that this technological development was directly linked to climate change and the spread of savannah grasslands. In the last decade, fieldwork in West Turkana, Kenya, has revealed evidence of much earlier technological behavior.

    Sonia Harmand will discuss the discovery of stone tools in a 3.3-million-year-old archaeological site in Kenya known as Lomekwi 3. She will show how this discovery is reshaping our...

    Read more about Exploring Humanity's Technological Origins

    After-School Animal Encounters: Super Skeletons

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Free Virtual Family Program

    Do snakes have bones? Can a turtle crawl out of its shell? How far could you jump if you were a frog? Looking at skeletons can help us answer these questions! Comparing the skeletons of different animals can help us learn more about how they live and move. Join human museum staffers Arielle and Javier as they lead you in a 45-minute program with live animals and specimens from the museum collections. This event will be fun for the whole family so bring your questions and sense of wonder.

    ...

    Read more about After-School Animal Encounters: Super Skeletons

    Education Now: Hope and Resilience in Childhood

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Join us as we explore new approaches to nurturing resilience, amplifying strengths, and building hope — in children and in the schools and communities that nurture them.

    Speakers:

    • Suniya Luthar, Co-Founder and Chief Research Officer, Authentic Connections; Professor Emerita, Teachers College, Columbia University
    • Robert Sege, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine and Director, Center for Community-engaged Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine

    Host:
    Junlei Li, Saul Zaentz Senior...

    Read more about Education Now: Hope and Resilience in Childhood

    The Impact of Gold Mining on the Feasibility of Malaria Elimination in the Amazon

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Caroline Buckee is a professor of epidemiology and the associate director of the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is writing a book focused on the impact of gold mining on the epidemiology and control of malaria in the Amazon rainforest while concurrently examining infectious disease epidemiology as a field of study, using malaria as an example. Join her to hear more about her current research.

    ...

    Read more about The Impact of Gold Mining on the Feasibility of Malaria Elimination in the Amazon

    TERREMOTO – David Godshall and Jenny Jones, "Radical Gardens of Love and Interconnectedness"

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    TERREMOTO is presently navigating a transitional period within its practice towards making omni-positive gardens and landscapes that are fair, just and generous in their relationships to labor, materials and ecology. We believe that we are at a cultural, environmental + civilizational fork in the road, and through deep internal self-interrogation of landscape history and practice (including our own), we are creating a constantly evolving set of metrics that will allow us (and you!) to create gardens that can lock horns with the BIGNESS of this moment. What a time to be alive! And what a...

    Read more about TERREMOTO – David Godshall and Jenny Jones, "Radical Gardens of Love and Interconnectedness"

    2022 David M. Lee Historical Lecture in Physics: "A personal historical view of the theory of deterministic chaos"

    Location: 

    Harvard Department of Physics—Online

    Classical deterministic time evolutions exist with apparent random features, as is seen in hydrodynamic turbulence. Such phenomena have been called deterministic chaos, and are associated with sensitive dependence on initial conditions.

    We discuss chaos theory with emphasis on the multidisciplinary work concerning chaos in natural phenomena during the three decades 1970-2000. Work in that period has involved developments in pure mathematics, new experimental techniques, and the use of digital computers. The problems addressed include hydrodynamical turbulence, meteorology,...

    Read more about 2022 David M. Lee Historical Lecture in Physics: "A personal historical view of the theory of deterministic chaos"

    The Consequences of Remote and Hybrid Learning for Achievement Gaps

    Location: 

    Harvard Center for Education Policy Research—Online

    Join this PIER Public Seminar about the consequences of remote and hybrid learning for achievement gaps, with speaker Thomas Kane (Walter H. Gale Professor of Education and Economics, Harvard Graduate School of Education).

    Health Justice in the Americas: The Role of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    The jurisprudence of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has been profoundly influential in the region since its inception in 1979. Since 2017, the Court has built up case law on the right to health, addressing an array of issues including: access to emergency care, HIV treatment, and health services for prison inmates; informed consent in physical and mental health care; and State duties to regulate private health providers and insurance companies.

    This event will be a moderated panel discussion among scholars who have been directly involved as experts in one or more of...

    Read more about Health Justice in the Americas: The Role of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

    Thursday Till Sunday

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Sotomayor's celebrated debut feature follows a young family on a road trip, of which the final destination remains ambiguous. Told largely from the point of view of ten-year-old Lucia as she observes the world unfolding before her and intuits her parents’ fraying relationship, Thursday Till Sunday avoids over-narrativization by focusing upon those in-between spaces and non-events noticed by the young girl.

    Cost: $10 for general public; $8 for non-Harvard students & seniors; free for Harvard ID holders

    ...

    Read more about Thursday Till Sunday

    Information Equity and Freedom Of Speech: U.S. Latino Communities

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    The prevalence of “fake news” in the media and across social networks has received widespread scrutiny, while the implications of fake news on equity for the U.S. Latino communities has received less attention. U.S. Latino communities have been targeted by misinformation campaigns and are particularly vulnerable to its harms.

    This conversation, moderated by C. Yulin Cruz Soto, will explore the intersections between fake news, freedom of speech, and equitable access to information. Speakers include Jorge Ramos, a Mexican-American journalist, author, and Univision news anchor...

    Read more about Information Equity and Freedom Of Speech: U.S. Latino Communities

    Gutman Library Book Talk - Leadership Through Mentoring: The Key to Improving the Confidence and Skill of Principals

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Leadership Through Mentoring: The Key to Improving the Principals Confidence and Skill lays out the case for the development of robust mentorship programs to support new school leaders. With principal turnover at an all-time high, it is urgent that schools and districts find ways to help newly appointed leaders grow into effective supervisors, managers, and strategic thinkers who can also find personal and professional satisfaction in their careers.

    Using examples from several established and successful state programs, Leadership Through Mentoring shows how...

    Read more about Gutman Library Book Talk - Leadership Through Mentoring: The Key to Improving the Confidence and Skill of Principals

    Screening: The Blue Eyes of Yonta

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Gomes' second film is a bold follow-up to Mortu Nega that extends its critical scrutiny of post-liberation Guinea-Bissau through a poignantly nuanced story of ardent dreams fractured across different generations. The eponymous heroine of The Blue Eyes of Yonta is a spirited young woman smitten with an old family friend, a hero of the revolution falling on hard times as he struggles to keep his business afloat and stay true to his ideals despite the corrosive pressures of the black market.

    Cost: $10 for general public; $8 for non-Harvard students & seniors...

    Read more about Screening: The Blue Eyes of Yonta

Pages