Events

    2020 Oct 15

    Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    The first person who will set foot on Mars is alive right now. We believe this, but even if we're wrong we know the first crew to arrive there will look nothing like the ones that landed on the Moon fifty years ago.

    Our world has changed for the better, and ASTRONAUTS tells the story of the women who built this better world. The main character and narrator is Mary Cleave, an astronaut you may not have heard of. It's not because so many people have been to space; only a few hundred have! It’s because this graphic novel isn’t about fame. No astronaut you'll ever meet took the...

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    2020 Oct 09

    Future of Education: Global Voices—to Create Welcoming Communities

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education, Askwith Forums—Online

    In a context of disruption and uncertainty, how can we fulfill our collective responsibility to ensure that all young people receive a high-quality and inclusive education? How can schools — and the communities around them — create welcoming spaces of belonging, even amid isolationism, both politically and pandemically?

    Join us for “Future of Education: Global Voices — to Create Welcoming Communities,” a discussion about the interconnected challenges of listening, belonging, and collective responsibility when it comes to educating and nurturing young people today. Big ideas...

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    2020 Oct 07

    ‘Here, There, and Elsewhere: The Making of Immigrant Identities in a Globalized World’

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Immigration Initiative at Harvard—Online

    Join the Immigration Initiative at Harvard for a webinar with Tahseen Shams, University of Toronto, as part of their ongoing Immigration Speaker Series.

    Speaker Bio: Tahseen Shams is Assistant Professor of Sociology and author of Here, There, and Elsewhere: The Making of Immigrant Identities in a Globalized World (Stanford University Press). Her research explores how transnational, global forms of inequality intersect with race and ethnicity to affect immigrant groups, particularly those coming from Muslim-majority countries to the United States and...

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    2020 Oct 05

    Gutman Library Book Talk: Black, Brown, Bruised: How Racialized STEM Education Stifles Innovation

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Gutman Library—Online

    Drawing on narratives from hundreds of Black, Latinx, and Indigenous individuals, Ebony Omotola McGee examines the experiences of underrepresented racially minoritized students and faculty members who have succeeded in STEM. Based on this extensive research, McGee advocates for structural and institutional changes to address racial discrimination, stereotyping, and hostile environments in an effort to make the field more inclusive.

    ...

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    2020 Oct 01

    On Account of Sex (1920)

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 did not "give" women the vote. Rather, it established a negative: that the right to vote could not be abridged on account of sex alone. This session brings together diverse participants who will each illuminate one facet of women’s political history at this key transitional moment. Together, participants will emphasize the radical achievement of the amendment, exploring the full implications of what it meant to remove sex as a barrier to voting, which resulted in the largest-ever one-time expansion of the electorate and mobilized a...

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    2020 Oct 01

    Race and Economic Justice

    1:30pm to 2:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center—Online via YouTube Live

    Please join the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy for its signature weekly series this fall, The Fierce Urgency of Now, featuring Black, Indigenous, People of Color scholars, activists, and community leaders, and experts from the Global South. Hosted and facilitated by Sushma Raman and Mathias Risse, the series also aligns with a course they will co-teach this fall at the Harvard Kennedy School on Economic Justice: Theory and Practice.

    Panelists: Brandon M. Terry | Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies and Social Studies,...

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    2020 Oct 01

    What Studying Putin’s Russia Can Teach Us about the United States: Masculinity, Misogyny, and U.S. Elections in the Trump Era

    12:30pm to 1:45pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    Vladimir Putin has long been known for his macho displays, and Donald Trump for his misogynist pronouncements. In both the U.S. and Russia, machismo and misogyny play fundamental roles in politics; the former is used to legitimize particular politicians as strong leaders, and the latter to undermine opponents as weak. In their lecture, while drawing parallels to Russia, Professors Robert Boatright and Valerie Sperling will focus on their new book about masculinity and misogyny in the U.S. political context, exploring how Donald Trump’s misogyny in the 2016 presidential race changed the...

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    2020 Sep 23

    Gutman Library Book Talk: Common-Sense Evidence: The Education Leader’s Guide to Using Data and Research

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Graduate School of Education

    Written by two leading experts in education research and policy, Common-Sense Evidence is a concise, accessible guide that helps education leaders find and interpret data and research, and then put that knowledge into action.

    Moderated by: Dr. Bridget Terry Long, Dean and Saris Professor of Education and Economics at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

    The panel discussion will feature:

    • Carrie Conaway, one of the book's authors and a senior lecturer on education at HGSE
    • Sonja Santelises, CEO of...
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    2020 Sep 17

    Observatory Night: What Stars Are Made Of

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    Join the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian for a virtual Public Observatory Night with guest lecturer Donavan Moore, author of "What Stars Are Made Of: The Life of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin."

    It was not easy being a woman of ambition in early twentieth-century England, much less one who wished to be a scientist. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin overcame prodigious obstacles to become a woman of many firsts: the first to receive a PhD in astronomy from Radcliffe College, the first promoted to full professor at Harvard, the first to head a department there. And, in what...

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    2020 Sep 17

    Reconstructing the Polity (1870)

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    The reconstruction of the American polity after the Civil War—in particular, the adoption of the 15th Amendment in 1870—marked a key moment in the long history of the 19th Amendment, women’s political mobilization, and the contested boundaries of United States citizenship.

    During the campaign for the 15th Amendment, and the campaign of racial terror that accompanied its passage, Black women mobilized to defend themselves and their communities, innovating ideas and strategies that would reshape the women’s suffrage movement. As federal troops moved from the South to the West,...

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    2020 Sep 17

    COVID-19 and the Stakes for Democracy in South America

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Law School, The Petrie-Flom Center

    The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a health crisis, or even an economic crisis, but also a critical inflection point for democracy and the rule of law. The pandemic has presented a test for the legitimacy of democratic governance, and perhaps nowhere are the stakes higher than in Latin America, which as of August 5, as a region had the world’s highest death toll per population.

    Even before the pandemic, the region as a whole faced staggering levels of social inequality...

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    2020 Sep 15

    Perfecters of This Democracy: A Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    Nikole Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter and creator of the 1619 Project, will engage in conversation with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, about pressing issues of race, civil rights, injustice, desegregation, and resegregation.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 14

    John Hedjuk Soundings Lecture: Rafael Moneo with Sarah Whiting, "Learning Architecture"

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Graduate School of Design

    Join Harvard Graduate School of Design for a virtual lecture with Rafael Moneo and Sarah Whiting. 

    Rafael Moneo, AM '85, was born in Tudela, Spain, in 1937. He graduated in 1961 from the Architecture School of Madrid. He was a professor in the Architecture Schools of Barcelona and Madrid, and he was appointed Chairman of the Architecture Department of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, where he is now Emeritus Josep Lluis Sert Professor in Architecture...

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    2020 Sep 11

    Book Talk: "Better, Not Perfect: A Realist’s Guide to Maximum Sustainable Goodness"

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Law School

    The Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School is pleased to present a virtual book talk with Max Bazerman on his forthcoming book, Better, Not Perfect: A Realist’s Guide to Maximum Sustainable Goodness. 

     

    Every day, we make hundreds of decisions. They’re largely personal, but these choices have an ethical twinge as well; they value certain principles and ends over others. This book explores how we can better make principled choices. Bazerman argues that we can better balance both dimensions—and we needn’t seek perfection to make...

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    2020 Sep 10

    Getting Out the BIPOC Vote: Digital Strategies to Build Power

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Ash Center

    Activists and practitioners were already preparing for a tumultuous election year before the COVID-19 pandemic hit our shores. Now, the months ahead present immense challenges—and opportunities—for redefining how civic engagement is practiced for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities.

    Join the Harvard Kennedy School for a timely discussion with leading practitioners who are effectively integrating digital strategies with authentic power-building while navigating a never-before-seen civic environment. All share a mission of giving real agency to vulnerable...

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    2020 Aug 26

    Voting Matters: Origin Stories: Keynote Address (1848)

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

    Join the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study for the beginning of the series Voting Matters: Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment with a keynote address by the historian Martha S. Jones, who will root the generations-long movement for women’s suffrage in the activism of African American women from the 1830s. Jones will explore the tangled intersections of gender and race in the battle for the ballot while considering the evolution of birthright citizenship, more broadly, as itself a gendered origins story about constituting the American people.

    ...

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    2020 Jul 22

    Education Now: What “Reopening” Means for Early Education

    3:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Early education administrators, center directors, and families are encountering many complex challenges and decisions as they are faced with reopening centers. What does high-quality early education look like in the era of COVID-19? How do we create and comply with protocols that will keep children and early educators safe?

    HGSE professor and co-director of the Saul Zaentz Early Education Initiative, Nonie Lesaux, explores these and other questions with Samantha Aigner-Treworgy, Commissioner of Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care, and Maria Gonzalez Moeller,...

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    2020 Jul 20

    Lift Every Voice: The Urgency of Universal Civic Duty Voting

    1:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Ash Center—Online

    In 26 countries across the world, there is some form of civic duty voting. What would this system look like in the United States? How could universal civic duty voting change the dynamic of our elections and campaigning? Does this proposal pass constitutional muster? What do Americans think of civic duty voting? These questions and more are addressed in a forthcoming report, "Lift Every Voice: The Urgency of Universal Civic Duty Voting."

    On July 20, Governance Studies at Brookings and the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School will cohost...

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    2020 Jun 22

    Gutman Library Book Talk: The 60 Year Curriculum: New Models for Lifelong Learning in the Digital Economy

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    The 60-Year Curriculum explores models and strategies for lifelong learning in an era of profound economic disruption and reinvention. Over the next half-century, globalization, regional threats to sustainability, climate change, and technologies such as artificial intelligence and data mining will transform our education and workforce sectors. Speakers will include:


    • Jim Honan, Ph.D.'89, Senior Lecturer on Education, HGSE
    • Chris Dede - Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies, Technology, Innovation, and Education Program, HGSE
    • ...
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    2020 Jun 18

    Ahhhhh!: How to Negotiate the Nonnegotiable in an Era of Discontent

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

    Our world is awash in conflict and tension. The combusting mix of the pandemic, economic turmoil, political divisiveness, and emotional turbulence has turned negotiation on its head. What seemed easy to deal with in the old normal is no longer so. Why is this, and what can we do about it? Drawing on his global research in conflict resolution, Dr. Shapiro will explore a framework he has developed that illuminates underlying psychological complexities fueling present-day conflict—and will offer insight on how to move forward.

    ...

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