Events

    Magic and Demonology in Ancient Egypt

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Ancient Egyptian texts and objects associated with funerary rituals often include references to “magic” and “demons.” Rita Lucarelli will look at how these concepts were defined and used in ancient Egypt, with a special focus on the roles that demons played in magical practices and spells. Through an examination of textual and material sources produced from the early Pharaonic to the Greco-Roman periods, she will also address how Egyptian beliefs about demons compare with those of other ancient cultures.

    ...

    Read more about Magic and Demonology in Ancient Egypt

    The Amazonian Travels of Richard Evans Schultes

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Richard Evans Schultes—ethnobotanist, taxonomist, writer, photographer, and Harvard professor—is regarded as one of the most important plant explorers of the twentieth century. In 1941, Schultes traveled to the Amazon rainforest on a mission to study how Indigenous peoples used plants for medicinal, ritual, and practical purposes. A new interactive online map, produced by the Amazon Conservation Team, traces the landscapes and cultures that Schultes explored in the Colombian Amazon. Plotkin and Hettler will share this map and discuss the relevance of Schultes’ travels and...

    Read more about The Amazonian Travels of Richard Evans Schultes

    Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Dilip Da Cunha, “The Invention of Rivers”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

    Separating land and water is not just an act of division; it is also an act of creation. It creates land and water from ubiquitous wetness, defining them on either side of a line. It is one of the first acts of design, setting out a ground of habitation with a line that has largely been naturalized in features such as the coastline, the riverbank, and the water’s edge. These features are subjected to artistic representations, scientific inquiry, infrastructural engineering, and landscape design with little awareness of the act that brought them...

    Read more about Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Dilip Da Cunha, “The Invention of Rivers”

    Designing Living Things

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Biology can be a design medium: scientists can now “write” DNA and manipulate microbial behavior. In the future, they could also reshape entire ecosystems. Christina Agapakis is a synthetic biologist, writer, and artist who collaborates with engineers, designers, artists, and social scientists to explore the many unexpected connections between microbiology, technology, art, and popular culture. In this lecture, she will discuss current and potential uses of biotechnology in various fields from agriculture and medicine to consumer goods and renewable energy.

    ...

    Read more about Designing Living Things

    Traces and Tracks: Journeys with the San

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    For nearly three decades, Paul Weinberg has travelled to Namibia, Botswana and South Africa to document the lives of hunter-gatherer communities, the San (Africa’s first people) and their struggles to hang on to their land, culture, and values, as they faced serious threats by outside settlers. Weinberg will discuss his book Traces and Tracks (Jacana Media 2017), the culmination of his thirty-year journey, featuring essays and over 100 photographs that convey the modern-day San’s daily lives, their relationship to nature, game parks, and their ways of adjusting to a...

    Read more about Traces and Tracks: Journeys with the San

    Countering Authoritarianism and Nationalism: Russia Needs Multiple Liberal Leaders

    Location: 

    Center for Government and International Studies South Building, Room S354, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Join us at the Center for Government and International Studies for a comparative politics seminar, "Countering Authoritarianism and Nationalism: Russia Needs Multiple Liberal Leaders," with speaker Zhanna Nemtsova.

    After studying economics at the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), Zhanna Nemtsova pursued a career in journalism at the Russian business news channel RBC TV, where she worked as a host and interviewed political and business figures. Following the assassination of her father, political opposition leader and Putin-critic Boris Nemtsov in...

    Read more about Countering Authoritarianism and Nationalism: Russia Needs Multiple Liberal Leaders

    Are Koreans Human? A Lecture with Best-Selling Author Min Jin Lee

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Who are the modern Koreans, and what do they care about? Koreans have experienced colonialism, diaspora, war, national division, immigration, and a persistent nuclear threat—and yet, they have achieved extraordinary gains in their homelands and elsewhere. Min Jin Lee, the author of the novels Free Food for Millionaires and Pachinko who is working on the third novel of The Koreans trilogy, will explore the will of Koreans to survive and flourish as global citizens, their enduring faith in education, and the costs of such a quest and what it may mean...

    Read more about Are Koreans Human? A Lecture with Best-Selling Author Min Jin Lee

    Bear at the Border: Russian Foreign Policy in Europe

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S354, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Russia has become increasingly assertive on the world stage, particularly in its intent to maintain a sphere of influence in Eurasia and Eastern Europe. More recently, Moscow has also become comfortable with interfering in Western Europe through asymmetric means. What is the Russian government’s strategy toward Europe? What are the levers of influence at the Kremlin's disposal and how does it wield them in Eastern vs Western Europe? At this seminar, Dr. Busygina and Dr. Polyakova will discuss the opportunities and constraints facing Russia with a specific look at Western Europe and...

    Read more about Bear at the Border: Russian Foreign Policy in Europe

    Norman Kelley, “Things not as they are”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Stubbins, Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

    Norman Kelley is an architecture and design collaborative based in Chicago and New Orleans. Founded in 2012 by Carrie Norman and Thomas Kelley, their work draws on the limits between two- and three-dimensions. Results vary in scale and medium: site-specific drawings, furniture, and architectural interiors. Thomas Kelley is an Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Carrie Norman is a registered architect (Louisiana, Illinois, and New York) and an Assistant Professor at Tulane...

    Read more about Norman Kelley, “Things not as they are”

    Beate Hølmebakk, “Constructions on Sites and Paper”

    Location: 

    Gund Hall Piper Auditorium, Harvard Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

    The lecture will be a presentation of selected projects by manthey kula. It will focus on built work, but also on one of the office’s unbuilt “paper projects”. Beate Hølmebakk will talk about manthey kula’s approach to design and about how some of the professors from her own education; Sverre Fehn, Christian Norberg-Schulz and John Hejduk have had an influence on the work of the office.

    RSVP Requirements: Free and ...

    Read more about Beate Hølmebakk, “Constructions on Sites and Paper”

    Twins in Space

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Spaceflight poses unusual stressors to the human body. To ensure that astronauts can perform under daunting conditions, NASA investigators have been studying the effect of long-duration spaceflight on crew members. This lecture will present the findings of the NASA Twins Study, which evaluated twin astronauts in different environments for one year: one in space and one on Earth.

    Learn more about and RSVP for Twins in...

    Read more about Twins in Space

    Combating Antibiotic Resistant Superbugs across Diverse Habitats

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Disease-causing bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to all available antibiotics, causing approximately 700,000 annual deaths globally and costing the US economy $55 billion each year.

    Gautam Dantas will discuss how new genomic and computational technologies are enabling a deeper understanding of how antibiotics affect diverse microbiomes, including the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance across diverse habitats. These insights enable the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for maintaining healthy microbiomes and preventing and treating future...

    Read more about Combating Antibiotic Resistant Superbugs across Diverse Habitats

    Lecture and Book Signing: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    After World War II, evolutionary scientists began rethinking their views on humanity’s past. What if human history was not merely a cooperative struggle against a harsh environment? What if violence and war were normal states of existence, punctuated by brief moments of peace? These are the questions Erika Lorraine Milam explores in her new book, Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America. She will discuss how anthropologists and zoologists during the Cold-War era struggled to reconcile humanity’s triumph as a species with the possibility that this...

    Read more about Lecture and Book Signing: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America

    Rouse Visiting Artist Lecture: Hans Ulrich Obrist

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium 105, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Hans Ulrich Obrist (b. 1968, Zurich, Switzerland) is Artistic Director of the Serpentine Galleries, London. Prior to this, he was the Curator of the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Since his first show “World Soup” (The Kitchen Show) in 1991 he has curated more than 300 shows.

    So far in 2018, Obrist has co-curated at the Serpentine Galleries solo shows for Rose Wylie, Wade Guyton, Ian Cheng, Sondra Perry, Tom Abts and Christo. In 2014 he curated the Swiss Pavilion at the 14th International Architecture Biennale in Venice, where he presented Lucius Burckhardt and...

    Read more about Rouse Visiting Artist Lecture: Hans Ulrich Obrist

    The Ghosts of Gombe

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    On July 12, 1969, Ruth Davis, a young American volunteer at Dr. Jane Goodall’s research site in Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania, left camp to follow a chimpanzee into the forest. Six days later, her body was found floating at the base of a high waterfall. What happened? Drawing on his recent book, The Ghosts of Gombe...

    Read more about The Ghosts of Gombe

    HHF Architects Lecture

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    HHF Architects was founded in 2003 by Tilo Herlach, Simon Hartmann and Simon Frommenwiler. Since its establishment, HHF have realized numerous projects in Switzerland, Germany, China, France, Mexico and the USA. The scope of work ranges from urbanism and large-scale construction to public pavilions and interior design.

    Learn more about HHF Architects Lecture. Read more about HHF Architects Lecture

    Guest Speaker: Shirin Neshat

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium 105, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Shirin Neshat‘s lecture will offer an overview of the development of her art and her ongoing multi-media practice involving still-photography, video installations, performance, and feature length films. She will primarily focus on her most recent projects, including her direction of an opera “Aida,” which was presented at the Salzburg Music Festival in 2017, in collaboration with world renowned Riccardo Muti and Soprano singer, Anna Netrebko; as well as speaking, and showing clips of her latest movie “Looking for...

    Read more about Guest Speaker: Shirin Neshat

    Yara Sharif, “The Not So Ordinary: Capturing Possibilities Through The Gaps”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Dr. Sharif will be sharing a collection of the various thoughts and ideas provoked by her own journeys and narratives when she lived and worked in Palestine, and which were later transformed into projects.

    The work will unpack alternative means to re-read and redraw the Palestinian landscape – from a Palestinian perspective – by stripping it off the dominant power of lines. Dr. Sharif will be using speculation – and at times...

    Read more about Yara Sharif, “The Not So Ordinary: Capturing Possibilities Through The Gaps”

    Accessibility & Art-Making: A Talk on Inclusivity in the Arts

    Location: 

    Harvard Dance Center, 66 Garden St., Cambridge, MA

    A panel discussion with Professor Michael Stein, Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability and one of the world’s leading experts on disability law and policy; Heidi Latsky, dancer, choreographer, and artistic director of Heidi Latsky Dance, a physically-integrated dance company; Tiffany Geigel, dancer with Heidi Latsky Dance; Dr. Debra Levine, Director of Undergraduate Studies and Lecturer on Theater, Dance & Media; and other Harvard faculty. This event is free and open to the public. Online registration is required due to...

    Read more about Accessibility & Art-Making: A Talk on Inclusivity in the Arts

    Early Science from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

    Location: 

    60 Garden Street, Phillips Auditorium, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Sam Quinn, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) began science operations in July 2018, and over the next two years will survey most of the sky in search of small planets transiting the nearest stars, the brightness of which enables studies of planetary compositions and atmospheric properties. These will likely be the planets on which we focus our search for life through the detection of biosignature gases in the planets' atmospheres. However, TESS is not just an exoplanet mission; by monitoring...

    Read more about Early Science from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

Pages