Events

    Science and Cooking Public Lecture: "Dialogue between Science and Cooking at El Celler de Can Roca. Evolution"

    Location: 

    Harvard Science Center, Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford St., Cambridge

    This lecture is part of the Science and Cooking Public Lecture series, which pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques.

    “Dialogue between Science and Cooking at El Celler de Can Roca. Evolution”
    Featuring:

    • Joan Roca (@CanRocaCeller), El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain, best restaurant in the world 2013 and 2015
    • Heloise Vilaseca (@heloiselois), director of R&D, El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain
    • Dimou...
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    Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Michelle Delk

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Michelle Delk is a passionate champion and designer of the urban public realm. Based in New York City, Michelle is a Partner and Landscape Architect with Snøhetta. Her work is trans-disciplinary, evocative, and representative of a simple foundational premise shared with Snøhetta: to create places that enhance the positive relationships between people and their environments. Both aspirational and pragmatic, her work reveals and complements the sublime qualities of embedded beauty and rational functionality within the...

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    The Remarkable Nature of Edward Lear

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Museum Natural History for a public lecture with Robert McCracken Peck, Curator of Art and Artifacts, Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University.

    Edward Lear (1812–1888), best known for The Owl and the Pussycat and other nonsense poetry, was also an accomplished painter of birds, mammals, reptiles, and landscapes, and an adventurous world traveler. His paintings of parrots, macaws, toucans, owls, and other birds are among the finest ever published. Robert McCracken Peck will discuss the remarkable life and natural history paintings of this...

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    The Future of Immortality: Remaking Life and Death in Contemporary Russia

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology for a public lecture and book signing with Anya Bernstein, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. 

    The international transhumanist movement believes that humans can harness science and technology to transcend their physical and mental limitations. Some of its practitioners support cryonics and the creation of robotic bodies for future “consciousness transfer.” Drawing from her ethnographic work among Russian transhumanists and her recent...

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    Rouse Visiting Artist Lecture: Susie Ibarra, “Listening and Creating Spatially: How do we hear in real life?”

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Composer/Percussionist Susie Ibarra creates music which often navigates how we hear in our environment and how our interdependence with each other and our surroundings informs and shapes these experiences. Ibarra will share several of her music works for performance and sound installations which include Fragility, A Game of Polyrhythms, a conducted game piece for performance which invites the audience to conduct an ensemble through polyrhythms; Music and Water Routes of the Medina of Fez , a music and architecture mobile app in collaboration with architect Aziza Chaouni, mapping with...

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    Human Sacrifice and Power in the Kerma Kingdom

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Semitic Museum for a public lecture with Elizabeth Minor, Visiting Assistant Professor in Anthropology at Wellesley College. 

    The Kerma Kingdom was an ancient Nubian civilization located in present-day Sudan. Its capital, the city of Kerma, had monumental architecture and religious art depicting deities in the form of lions, scorpions, and hybrid figures such as winged giraffes and hippopotamus goddesses. During the Classic Kerma Period (1700–1550 BCE), funerary monuments of Kerman kings could be up to one hundred meters long and included hundreds of...

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    Pulsatility and the Search for Life

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Pulsation permeates the universe at every scale, from heartbeats to pulsars. Join the artist Dario Robleto and the astrophysicist Abraham (Avi) Loeb, both of whom engage deeply with pulsatility in their work, for a conversation on how the arts and sciences can explore a common set of understandings.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

    ...

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    Paleovirology: Ghosts and Gifts of Ancient Viruses

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Museum of Natural History for a public lecture with Harmit Malik, Principal Investigator at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

    Human genomes are ancient battlegrounds of arms races waged between viruses and their hosts for millions of years. Just as historians reconstruct battlefields to better understand historical battles, evolutionary biologists and virologists can reconstruct how ancient viruses affected their hosts by analyzing their “fossil” remains in our genomes. Paleovirology is the study of such extinct viruses. Harmit Malik will discuss...

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    Breaking My Silence: Amplifying Our Voices as “Others”

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    In this lecture, Zimbabwean writer and educator Neal Hovelmeier shares publicly for the first time his lived experience as a gay man in a deeply homophobic environment. A year after his decision to come out made him a target of focused public outcry—including death threats—and forced him to resign from his job at a top Zimbabwean school, Hovelmeier will share his insights about how people living on the margins of society struggle to use their voices against the forces that seek to silence them.

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    After Migration: In Defense of Using Beauty to Illustrate the Journeys of Those Who Have Suffered

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums Menschel Hall, Lower Level, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Designer, filmmaker, and writer Walé Oyéjidé, Esq., will screen and discuss his short documentary After Migration: Calabria (2020), with Harvard professor Teju Cole. The film celebrates the lives of refugees through fashion design, filmmaking, and photography, and Oyéjidé and Cole will discuss the impacts that transcendent storytelling can have on the lives of those who are commonly shown as victims.

    Before the lecture, guests are invited to view the ...

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    Book Talk: Forgotten Bastards of the Eastern Front

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S020 (Belfer Case Study Room), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    Please join the Davis Center for a talk with author Serhii Plokhii about his new book, Forgotten Bastards of the Eastern Front: American Airmen Behind Soviet Lines and the Collapse of the Grand Alliance, which tells the story of the U.S. Air Force establishing bases in Soviet Ukraine in order to "shuttle bomb" the Germans from the Eastern Front. In conversation with historian Nina Tumarkin and with Thomas Holzman, whose father, Franklyn Holzman, figures in the book. Franklyn Holzman served on the Eastern Front in World War II, completed graduate work in Soviet economics at...

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    Adversity, Belonging, and Survival Among Baboons

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Museum of Natural History for a public lecture with Susan Alberts, Robert F. Durden Professor of Biology and Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University. 

    The social environment—both in early life and adulthood—has major effects on human health and survival. But how and why does the social environment get “under the skin” to also affect our physical health? Susan Alberts pursues this question by studying wild baboons in Kenya. Baboons, like humans, evolved as savannah dwellers. They rely on social relationships to solve problems and—like humans...

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    James Sloss Ackerman Memorial Lecture: Guido Beltramini

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, 485 Broadway Lecture Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    This lecture, in memorium of James Sloss Ackerman, Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Fine Art Emeritus, is sponsored by the Department of History of Art and Architecture and the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

    James Sloss Ackerman was born in 1919 in San Francisco. At Yale University his professor, Henri Focillon, wrote to him “Remain faithful to our studies for which you are so well suited.” Ackerman's graduate work focusing on Renaissance architecture was guided by Richard Krautheimer and Erwin Panofsky at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. His...

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    Louisiana Medley: The Social Justice Photography of Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums Menschel Hall, Lower Level, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    New Orleans–based photographers Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun discuss their decades-long, expansive documentary work that explores criminal and environmental justice, the history of slavery, and African American life and culture in the American South. They will be joined in conversation by Makeda Best, the Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at the Harvard Art Museums, and John Stauffer, the Sumner R. and Marshall S. Kates Professor of English and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.

    This event is free and open to the...

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    Great Russian Jews: Solomon Mikhoels (1890–1948)

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    This panel discussion with two leading Jewish cultural historians examines the remarkable contributions and tragic death of the great actor, theater director, playwright, visionary of Yiddish culture, and Jewish activist Solomon (Shloyme) Mikhoels (1890–1948).

    Born Shloyme Vovsi in Dvinsk (now Daugavpils, Latvia), the genius actor Mikhoels became the chief director of the State Jewish Theater in Moscow. During World War II, he served as chairman of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee. Mikhoels’ assassination by Stalin’s secret police, although officially billed as an accident,...

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    The Diffusion and Adoption of Welfare-Enhancing Innovations

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Todd Rogers is a behavioral scientist and professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Using his two decades of work in behavioral policy as a base, he will discuss his current research into what leads to welfare-enhancing innovations and practices. In particular, he aims to help scholars and practitioners design, identify, and invest in innovations that are likely to successfully scale.

    This event is free and open to the public. 

    ...

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    Kiley Fellow Lecture: Paola Sturla

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Paola Sturla is a registered Architetto and Paesaggista in Italy, a Ph.D. candidate in Urban Planning, Design, and Policy at Politecnico di Milano, and the 2018-19 Daniel Urban Kiley teaching fellow at Harvard University Graduate School of Design. She holds a Master of Landscape Architecture (Harvard GSD 2011, with distinction), as well as a Master of Architecture (PoliMi 2007).

    Her current research aims to critically investigate how AI-based tools and computer simulations could support landscape architecture in the context of infrastructure planning, taking advantage of the user’...

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    "Broken Nature" and Other Design Exhibitions for the Real World

    Location: 

    Menschel Hall, Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Art Museums for a Curatorial Innovations Lecture with Paola Antonelli Senior Curator, Architecture and Design; Director, Research & Development at The Museum of Modern Art.

    The XXII Triennale di Milano, Broken Nature: Design Takes on Human Survival, highlighted the concept of restorative design, plotting its role in surveying our species’ bonds with the complex systems in the world, and in designing reparations when necessary, through objects, concepts, and new systems. Antonelli will take stock of the experience, casting the...

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    The Once and Future Heart

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    For centuries, in both the arts and the sciences, the human heart has been a source of reverence and marvel. In this conversation, the artist Dario Robleto, whose exhibition at the Radcliffe Institute rethinks the deep history of cardiological recording, and Doris A. Taylor, a leading scientist in regenerative medicine, will discuss the surprising opportunities for both the arts and sciences to converge around new insights and questions of the human heart.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

    ...

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    Mariabruna Fabrizi, Fosco Lucarelli (Microcities / Socks-studio), "Inner Space"

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    “Inner Space” is part of an ongoing research project into the construction of the architectural imagination which the authors have pursued in the last decade through different media. Through a website and a visual atlas (socks-studio.com), an architectural practice (Microcities), teaching activity and the curating of an exhibition at Lisbon Triennale 2019, the authors have set out to investigate the space between inner and outer reality, looking for those moments in which the two realms interact most vividly. This event is free and open to the public. 

    M.Fabrizi and...

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