Events

    2020 Feb 12

    Lev Rubinstein: Readings, Conversations about Russia Today

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center, Knafel Building, Room K262, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    Moscow writer Lev Rubinstein will read from his work and engage in a wide-ranging conversation in a special Davis Center seminar.

    Rubinstein exemplifies a striking aesthetic response to life in repressive times, one that emphasizes the artist’s freedom of expression and the power of humor in the face of lies. He has won multiple prizes at home and abroad and has a readiness to push at the boundaries of literary norms. Author of more than a dozen books in Russian, Rubinstein has been more active as an essayist since the start of the 2000s. He has also emerged as a public figure...

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    2020 Feb 12

    Lecture: no noise disturbed the quiet of the morning

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    As a Radcliffe fellow, Anthony Romero (RI '20) is working on a multimedia research and visual art project that includes a collection of related but discrete works which attempt to articulate how indigenous populations, under European colonial rule in Australia, South Asia, and the United States, were controlled through the criminalization and legislating of native sound and music practices. Taken together, these histories reveal how carceral and criminalizing strategies sowed the seeds for the ongoing over-policing of black and brown communities.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 11

    What Makes Chocolate "Good?"

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The social and environmental values underlying artisanal chocolate production have become increasingly important in its marketing. Good taste is paramount, of course, but how does one measure "social goodness," and what additional value does it add for the consumer? Chocolate makers’ interests often diverge from those of cacao producers, and industry stakeholders have not clearly addressed these concerns. Carla Martin will examine the cacao-chocolate industry and highlight the often conflicting goals that can create gaps in social and environmental responsibility.

    A...

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    2020 Feb 11

    Lecture: Diary of a Tap Dancer

    4:15pm

    Location: 

    Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    During her fellowship, Ayodele Casel (RI '20) is working on Diary of a Tap Dancer, a theatrical work positioning tap dance as the driving force of the narrative. This project aims to create a fuller and more accurate picture of the legacy of the art form by centering the voices of its unnamed women within a broader historical context. Diary explores shared themes of hoofers past and present with stories illuminating the struggle and joy of expression, communication, the evolution of jazz music, gender inequality, and the personal and culturally devastating implications for women...

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    2020 Feb 10

    Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement

    5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    From Botox to bionic limbs, the human body is more upgradable than ever. But how much can we alter and still be human? The award-winning documentary Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement explores the social impact of human biotechnologies. Fixed rethinks “disability” and “normalcy” by exploring technologies that promise to change our bodies and minds forever. Join us for a discussion about the ethics of gene editing and disability.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 06

    Lecture: The Imprint of the Landscape

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Please join us for the Frederick Law Olmsted Lecture delivered by landscape architect Günther Vogt. Vogt's lecture will also mark the opening of the exhibition Günther Vogt: First the Forests, which is on view in the Druker Design Gallery from January 21–March 8, 2020. A reception in the gallery will take place immediately following the lecture.

    What is the relevant scale for operating with the landscape of the city?

    Since the Industrial Revolution at the latest, humans have become the determining factor for global ecosystems. This fact becomes...

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    2020 Feb 05

    Uncharted Exclaves — Modernism and Other -Isms in the Practices of Taiwanese Architecture

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Throughout its history, Taiwan has been the laboratory for architectural experiments, or more precisely, the exclaves of all architectural movements and the -isms. It was the last frontier for southern style Chinese architecture, the experimental field for Japanese young architects' endeavors, the perpetual battle ground for “Contemporary Chinese” versus “Traditional Taiwanese”, the restless landscape for postmodernism and its two non-formal counterparts, critical regionalism (Tzonis, Alexander & Liane Lefaivre / Kenneth Frampton) and dirty realism (Lefaivre, L. / Jameson, F.), and...

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    2020 Jan 23

    Gallery Talk: Walk Like an Egyptian

    12:30pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Fellow Jen Thum explores the basics of ancient Egyptian representation, including why their bodies seem to "walk like an Egyptian."

    Free with museum admission. Gallery talks are limited to 15 people and tickets are required. Ten minutes before each talk, tickets will become available at the admissions desk.

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    2019 Dec 13

    Making Pig-to-Human Transplantation a Clinical Reality with CRISPR Genome Editing

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Xenotransplantation is a promising strategy to address the shortage of organs for human transplantation, though concerns about pig-to-human immunological compatibility and the risk of cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) have impeded the clinical application of this approach. In this lecture, Luhan Yang, cofounder and chief scientific officer of eGenesis will explain how CRISPR is being used to create pigs with advanced immunological modifications to address immunological and functional compatibility issues.

    This event is free and open to the...

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    2019 Dec 11

    The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World’s Oldest Bible

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Chanan Tigay is an award-winning journalist and nonfiction writer who has covered the Middle East, 9/11, and the United Nations for such outlets as AFP, the Atlantic, GQ, and the New Yorker. In this lecture, Tigay will talk about his first book, The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World’s Oldest Bible, which tells the story of the oldest Bible in the world, how its outing as a fraud led to a scandalous death, and why archaeologists now believe it was real—if only they could find it. In addition to the story of this controversial Bible, Tigay will speak about his own hunt for the...

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    2019 Dec 11

    Curbing Gun Violence: Strategies for Change

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online webcast from The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    Nearly 40,000 people died from gun-related injuries in the U.S. in 2017 -- the most in 20 years. And while mass shootings grab headlines, they account for a small part of gun-related murders in the country. Urban gun violence remains a tremendous --  and too often overlooked -- burden on underserved communities. And suicides persist as accounting for the majority of U.S. gun deaths. As the seventh anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting approaches, this Forum event will examine contrasting facets of gun violence in America. Seeking to move the discussion past...

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    2019 Dec 04

    Civilizing the Internet of Things

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge,

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deeply interconnected ecosystem of billions of devices and systems that are transforming commerce, science, and society. IoT technologies can be used to disrupt, exploit, bias, bully, and intrude as well as to make our lives safer, more efficient, and more convenient. Join Francine Berman, Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in an exploration of the larger social and environmental ecosystem needed to develop an IoT that maximizes benefits, minimizes risk, and promotes individual protections...

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    2019 Dec 03

    The Call of Migratory Things

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    In this lecture, award-winning Nina McConigley, author of the short-story collection Cowboys and East Indians, will discuss her upcoming novel titled “The Call of Migratory Things.” With the landscape of the American West as the framework of this different kind of pioneer narrative, the novel considers how race, immigration, colonialism, post-frontier America, motherhood and fertility, and place intersect.

    This event is free and open to the public. 

    ...

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    2019 Dec 03

    Recreational Marijuana and CBD: Public Attitudes, Science and the Law

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online webcast from The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    In the last decade, Americans’ relationship with cannabis has transformed: today, dozens of states have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use and American farmers can grow hemp on an industrial scale. Meanwhile, shoppers can find cannabidiol (CBD), which is derived from cannabis but does not produce a “high” like marijuana, in everything from oils to vapes, chocolate bars, cosmetics—even dog treats. Some say CBD can relieve stress, pain, anxiety, and more, with no side effects. But the evidence for many of these claims is limited, and state and federal laws around the sale...

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    2019 Dec 02

    Science and Cooking Public Lecture: "Dialogue between Science and Cooking at El Celler de Can Roca. Evolution"

    7:00pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Science Center, Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford St., Cambridge

    This lecture is part of the Science and Cooking Public Lecture series, which pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques.

    “Dialogue between Science and Cooking at El Celler de Can Roca. Evolution”
    Featuring:

    • Joan Roca (@CanRocaCeller), El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain, best restaurant in the world 2013 and 2015
    • Heloise Vilaseca (@heloiselois), director of R&D, El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain
    • Dimou...
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    2019 Nov 21

    Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Michelle Delk

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Michelle Delk is a passionate champion and designer of the urban public realm. Based in New York City, Michelle is a Partner and Landscape Architect with Snøhetta. Her work is trans-disciplinary, evocative, and representative of a simple foundational premise shared with Snøhetta: to create places that enhance the positive relationships between people and their environments. Both aspirational and pragmatic, her work reveals and complements the sublime qualities of embedded beauty and rational functionality within the...

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    2019 Nov 21

    The Remarkable Nature of Edward Lear

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Museum Natural History for a public lecture with Robert McCracken Peck, Curator of Art and Artifacts, Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University.

    Edward Lear (1812–1888), best known for The Owl and the Pussycat and other nonsense poetry, was also an accomplished painter of birds, mammals, reptiles, and landscapes, and an adventurous world traveler. His paintings of parrots, macaws, toucans, owls, and other birds are among the finest ever published. Robert McCracken Peck will discuss the remarkable life and natural history paintings of this...

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    2019 Nov 20

    The Future of Immortality: Remaking Life and Death in Contemporary Russia

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology for a public lecture and book signing with Anya Bernstein, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. 

    The international transhumanist movement believes that humans can harness science and technology to transcend their physical and mental limitations. Some of its practitioners support cryonics and the creation of robotic bodies for future “consciousness transfer.” Drawing from her ethnographic work among Russian transhumanists and her recent...

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    2019 Nov 19

    Rouse Visiting Artist Lecture: Susie Ibarra, “Listening and Creating Spatially: How do we hear in real life?”

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Composer/Percussionist Susie Ibarra creates music which often navigates how we hear in our environment and how our interdependence with each other and our surroundings informs and shapes these experiences. Ibarra will share several of her music works for performance and sound installations which include Fragility, A Game of Polyrhythms, a conducted game piece for performance which invites the audience to conduct an ensemble through polyrhythms; Music and Water Routes of the Medina of Fez , a music and architecture mobile app in collaboration with architect Aziza Chaouni, mapping with...

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