Events

    Voting, Participation, and Why it Matters

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

     

    Join Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, Cambridge Mayor Sumbul Siddiqui, Tova Wang, a Democracy Visiting Fellow at the Ash Center, Michelle Tassinari, Director and Legal Counsel of the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s Elections Division, and Eneida Tavares the Interim Commissioner for the City of Boston’s Elections Department for a conversation on the importance of local voter participation, education and civic engagement, and to learn more about what’s at stake for our...

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    Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    “What college does, it helps us learn about the nation,” said Rodney Spivey-Jones, a 2017 Bard College graduate currently incarcerated at Fishkill Correctional Facility in New York, in the docuseries College behind Bars. “It helps us become civic beings. It helps us understand that we have an interest in our community, that our community is a part of us and we are a part of it.”

    The Bard Prison Initiative and programs at other institutions of higher learning across the country have brought together teachers and learners in incarcerated spaces for years. This panel will gather...

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    New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    By the early 1980s, a new political landscape was taking shape that would fundamentally influence American society and politics in the decades to come. That year, the long-standing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—championed by suffragist Alice Paul and introduced to Congress in 1923—ran aground, owing in significant measure to the activism of women who pioneered a new brand of conservatism.

    This panel will draw together strands and stories that are often kept separate: the ideas and growing influence of conservative women, the political activism of gay communities...

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    On Account of Sex (1920)

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 did not "give" women the vote. Rather, it established a negative: that the right to vote could not be abridged on account of sex alone. This session brings together diverse participants who will each illuminate one facet of women’s political history at this key transitional moment. Together, participants will emphasize the radical achievement of the amendment, exploring the full implications of what it meant to remove sex as a barrier to voting, which resulted in the largest-ever one-time expansion of the electorate and mobilized a...

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    What Studying Putin’s Russia Can Teach Us about the United States: Masculinity, Misogyny, and U.S. Elections in the Trump Era

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    Vladimir Putin has long been known for his macho displays, and Donald Trump for his misogynist pronouncements. In both the U.S. and Russia, machismo and misogyny play fundamental roles in politics; the former is used to legitimize particular politicians as strong leaders, and the latter to undermine opponents as weak. In their lecture, while drawing parallels to Russia, Professors Robert Boatright and Valerie Sperling will focus on their new book about masculinity and misogyny in the U.S. political context, exploring how Donald Trump’s misogyny in the 2016 presidential race changed the...

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    Reconstructing the Polity (1870)

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    The reconstruction of the American polity after the Civil War—in particular, the adoption of the 15th Amendment in 1870—marked a key moment in the long history of the 19th Amendment, women’s political mobilization, and the contested boundaries of United States citizenship.

    During the campaign for the 15th Amendment, and the campaign of racial terror that accompanied its passage, Black women mobilized to defend themselves and their communities, innovating ideas and strategies that would reshape the women’s suffrage movement. As federal troops moved from the South to the West,...

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    COVID-19 and the Stakes for Democracy in South America

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Law School, The Petrie-Flom Center

    The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a health crisis, or even an economic crisis, but also a critical inflection point for democracy and the rule of law. The pandemic has presented a test for the legitimacy of democratic governance, and perhaps nowhere are the stakes higher than in Latin America, which as of August 5, as a region had the world’s highest death toll per population.

    Even before the pandemic, the region as a whole faced staggering levels of social inequality...

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    Getting Out the BIPOC Vote: Digital Strategies to Build Power

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Ash Center

    Activists and practitioners were already preparing for a tumultuous election year before the COVID-19 pandemic hit our shores. Now, the months ahead present immense challenges—and opportunities—for redefining how civic engagement is practiced for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities.

    Join the Harvard Kennedy School for a timely discussion with leading practitioners who are effectively integrating digital strategies with authentic power-building while navigating a never-before-seen civic environment. All share a mission of giving real agency to vulnerable...

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    Voting Matters: Origin Stories: Keynote Address (1848)

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

    Join the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study for the beginning of the series Voting Matters: Gender, Citizenship, and the Long 19th Amendment with a keynote address by the historian Martha S. Jones, who will root the generations-long movement for women’s suffrage in the activism of African American women from the 1830s. Jones will explore the tangled intersections of gender and race in the battle for the ballot while considering the evolution of birthright citizenship, more broadly, as itself a gendered origins story about constituting the American people.

    ...

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    Webinar: The Labor of Fashion, the Global COVID-19 Crisis, and the Politics of Resistance in Bangladesh

    Location: 

    Online Event

    The global apparel industry is currently facing an unprecedented crisis resulting from the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. Major fashion retailers in the Global North are closing their stores and laying off workers. The same brands that demonstrated strong public commitment for protecting the safety and security of Bangladeshi garment workers after the Rana Plaza collapse in 2013 are not hesitating to cancel or suspend orders or delay payments. Thousands of workers are currently out of work and facing a unique livelihood, as well as a health threat. 

    Bangladeshi local labor...

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    The Media, The White House, and Health Care

    Location: 

    Livestream Access

    Join us for the next “Voices in Leadership” event of the fall semester, featuring Joanne Kenen, Executive Editor, Health Care at Politico and Margaret Talev, Senior White House Correspondent for Bloomberg. Ms. Kenen has is a veteran Washington reporter who has covered all aspects of health policy and politics. At POLITICO since 2011, she’s expanded the health policy reporting team, led public policy forums and recently helped design a year-long multimedia magazine series on public health and the changing demographics of 21st century America. Ms. Talev is a Fall 2018...

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