Events

    What Old Chimps Can Tell Us About Healthy Aging

    Location: 

    Harvard Alumni Association—Online

    Humans are living longer lives than ever before and so it is critical to understand the process of aging. It has become increasingly recognized that successful aging is not just about physical health but also about our social lives.

    Chimpanzees are our closest living relative and also lead long and complex lives. In this talk, you’ll learn what chimpanzee aging can tell us about human aging.

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    The Future of COVID-19 Epidemiology

    Location: 

    Online Event

    To what extent is our future with COVID-19 knowable? As new information about the transmission, demographics, and treatment of COVID-19 emerge, epidemiologists continue to address complex data and generate new predictive models to better understand the dynamics of the virus. Join leading epidemiologists for a panel discussion as they assess the current and future state of the epidemic.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

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    Benefitting from the Human Genome

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    In 2006, Anne Wojcicki cofounded 23andMe to help people access, understand, and benefit from the human genome, and she now serves as the company’s CEO.

    In this conversation, Wojcicki will discuss the evolving benefits of genomic science, including the company’s crowdsourced research platform. This platform has played a role in creating one of the largest COVID-19 research studies, exploring whether genetics plays a role in the severity or susceptibility to the virus, and is helping to drive the discovery of novel, genetically validated therapeutic targets to bring new...

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    Harvard Science Book Talk: Black Hole Survival Guide

    Location: 

    Harvard Division of Science—Online

    Janna Levin, professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College and an acclaimed author of Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space, and How the Universe Got Its Spots, will present her new book, Black Hole Survival Guide.

    Through her writing, Levin has focused on making the science she studies not just comprehensible but also intriguing to the nonscientist. This book, illustrated with original artwork by American painter and photographer Lia Halloran, helps us to understand and find delight in possibly the most opaque theoretical construct ever imagined...

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    Next in Water

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose creative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area. The speakers in this program will discuss water’s vital role across four areas of modern inquiry: biology, earth science, public health, and the search for extraterrestrial life.

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    National Fossil Day

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Celebrate National Fossil Day—a celebration organized by the National Park Service—by taking a closer look at museum fossils with Harvard paleontologists. What can we see on ancient seafloors? How do modern animals help us understand extinct animals? What fossils still amaze scientists? What is it like to be a practicing paleontologist? Bring your curiosity and questions to this online event for all ages!

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    Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    The first person who will set foot on Mars is alive right now. We believe this, but even if we're wrong we know the first crew to arrive there will look nothing like the ones that landed on the Moon fifty years ago.

    Our world has changed for the better, and ASTRONAUTS tells the story of the women who built this better world. The main character and narrator is Mary Cleave, an astronaut you may not have heard of. It's not because so many people have been to space; only a few hundred have! It’s because this graphic novel isn’t about fame. No astronaut you'll ever meet took the...

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    Wonderful Cambrian Beasts

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Earth is home to a vast diversity of organisms that collectively define the modern biosphere. How did this diversity come to be? Javier Ortega-Hernández will discuss his approach to answering this question by studying organisms that lived more than half a billion years ago in the Cambrian Period (485–541 million years ago). By focusing on the earliest-known animals—some of the most versatile to ever exist—Ortega-Hernández aims to reconstruct the early evolutionary history of major animal groups and contribute to our understanding of Earth’s biodiversity.

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    Gutman Library Book Talk: Black, Brown, Bruised: How Racialized STEM Education Stifles Innovation

    Location: 

    Harvard Gutman Library—Online

    Drawing on narratives from hundreds of Black, Latinx, and Indigenous individuals, Ebony Omotola McGee examines the experiences of underrepresented racially minoritized students and faculty members who have succeeded in STEM. Based on this extensive research, McGee advocates for structural and institutional changes to address racial discrimination, stereotyping, and hostile environments in an effort to make the field more inclusive.

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    Observatory Night: What Stars Are Made Of

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    Join the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian for a virtual Public Observatory Night with guest lecturer Donavan Moore, author of "What Stars Are Made Of: The Life of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin."

    It was not easy being a woman of ambition in early twentieth-century England, much less one who wished to be a scientist. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin overcame prodigious obstacles to become a woman of many firsts: the first to receive a PhD in astronomy from Radcliffe College, the first promoted to full professor at Harvard, the first to head a department there. And, in what...

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    Harvard Science Book Talk: Rita Colwell, "A Lab of One's Own: One Woman's Personal Journey Through Sexism in Science"

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Division of Science, Cabot Science Library, and Harvard Book Store

    Rita Colwell, a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation, will talk about her new book, A Lab of One's Own: One Woman's Personal Journey Through Sexism in Science. The book is a memoir-manifesto about the entrenched sexism in science, the elaborate detours women have taken to bypass the problem, and how to fix the system.

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    Using the Pandemic Recovery to Spur the Clean Transition

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center

    In this webinar, Rachel Kyte (Dean, Fletcher School, Tufts University) will discuss a potential green recovery from the pandemic—how recovery efforts might be leveraged to accelerate the transition to a clean and sustainable energy system—in the United States and globally.

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    Digital Health Apps: Evidence, Reimbursement and Outcomes

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online event

    Apps for health, wellness and disease management are increasingly common across the healthcare ecosystem. Health systems, biotech and pharma, payers and pharmacy benefits managers are just a few of the industry sectors actively using digital tools to try to improve care delivery and outcomes.

    This webinar will discuss emerging lessons and concepts from this space. What is the practical significance of the designation “digital therapeutic?” What are the current regulatory pathways? How does reimbursement actually work? Megan Jones Bell, MD, Chief Science Officer for Headspace,...

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    Harvard Science Book Talk: Sarah Stewart Johnson, "The Sirens of Mars"

    Location: 

    Harvard FAS Division of Science—Online

    Mars was once similar to Earth, but today there are no rivers, no lakes, no oceans. Coated in red dust, the terrain is bewilderingly empty. And yet multiple spacecraft are circling Mars, sweeping over Terra Sabaea, Syrtis Major, the dunes of Elysium, and Mare Sirenum—on the brink, perhaps, of a staggering find, one that would inspire humankind as much as any discovery in the history of modern science.

    In her beautifully observed, deeply personal book, The Sirens of Mars: Searching for Life on Another World, Georgetown scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson tells the story of...

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    The Bridge: Natural Gas in a Redivided Europe

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Three decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the breakup of the Soviet empire, the West faces a new era of East-West tensions. Any vision of a modern Russia integrated into the world economy and aligned in peaceful partnership with a reunited Europe has abruptly vanished. Two opposing narratives vie to explain the strategic future of Europe, one geopolitical and one economic, and both center on the same resource: natural gas. In The Bridge, Thane Gustafson, an expert on Russian oil and gas, argues that the political rivalries that capture the lions share of media attention...

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    Who Discovered Evolution?

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Charles Darwin is commonly cited as the person who “discovered” evolution. But, the historical record shows that roughly seventy different individuals published work on the topic of evolution between 1748 and 1859, the year that Darwin published On the Origin of Species. These early thinkers, now almost entirely forgotten, included biologists, geologists, horticulturists, physicians, clergymen, atheists, philosophers, teachers, and poets.

    William Friedman will discuss the ideas of these pre-Darwinian evolutionists, place Darwin in a broader historical context, and...

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    The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the tenth and eleventh centuries. The causes continue to be investigated and debated. Paleoenvironmental research over the past twenty years has revealed that the demise coincided with a prolonged, intensive drought that extended across the region, providing compelling evidence that climate change played a key role in the collapse of the Maya. Billie Turner will examine this evidence and the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

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    Olfaction in Science and Society

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    The sense of smell plays a critical role in human behavior, from warning us of potential dangers to attracting us to certain foods, places, and people. Harvard scientists Catherine Dulac and Venkatesh Murthy study the molecules, cells, and brain circuits that underlie olfaction and the social behaviors that aromas can elicit. In this program, they will engage in a conversation with internationally recognized olfactive expert Dawn Goldworm to discuss how neurobiological research on olfaction relates to our everyday experiences.

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