Events

    2022 May 03

    Cochineal: How Mexico Made the World See Red

    (All day)

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Cochineal, a tiny insect found on certain species of Oaxacan cacti, was harvested for millennia by Indigenous peoples to dye fabrics a vibrant red color. But following the European invasion of the Americas in the sixteenth century, it became a widely coveted, globally traded commodity that transformed textiles and art, and made Mexico a center for technological innovation. Cochineal: How Mexico Made the World See Red explores how this Indigenous technology changed the world, becoming an international symbol of power, while simultaneously disenfranchising its discoverers.

    ... Read more about Cochineal: How Mexico Made the World See Red

    Harvard Design Magazine #50 Issue Launch and Conversation

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    “Today is global” is a rather banal truism, but what really is today’s globalism? In a conversation with contributors from across the globe, Harvard Design Magazine introduces issue #50: Today’s Global, guest-edited by Sarah M. Whiting and Rahul Mehrotra.

    Today’s world has entered a phase of critical backlash against globalization, which is for some a critique of...

    Read more about Harvard Design Magazine #50 Issue Launch and Conversation

    Art Talk Live: Yasuo Kuniyoshi’s Last Act

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Yasuo Kuniyoshi once proclaimed that “an artist’s drawings are his first words.” Having emigrated from Japan to the United States at the age of 16, Kuniyoshi relied upon drawing as his most expressive medium. Through drawing, he translated the anxiety, disillusionment, and alienation faced by Japanese émigrés in the aftermath of World War II into a uniquely personal and dynamic American modernist style.

    ...

    Read more about Art Talk Live: Yasuo Kuniyoshi’s Last Act

    Gutman Library Book Talk - Trauma-Responsive Schooling: Centering Student Voice and Healing

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Trauma-Responsive Schooling outlines a novel approach to transforming American schools through student-centered, trauma-informed practices. The book chronicles the use of an innovative educational model, Trauma-Responsive Equitable Education (TREE), as part of a multiyear research project in two elementary schools in rural Maine. In this model, Lyn Mikel Brown,Ed.D.'89, Catharine Biddle, and Mark Tappan, Ed.D.'87, endorse whole-school change, encouraging educators to upend traditional classroom power dynamics by listening foremost to student voices, validating student...

    Read more about Gutman Library Book Talk - Trauma-Responsive Schooling: Centering Student Voice and Healing

    Yvonne Andersen and the Yellow Ball Workshop: Films By Kids

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    An influential and acclaimed animator, teacher and author, Yvonne Andersen started the pioneering Yellow Ball Workshop in her home, teaching children every aspect of film animation so they could make their own films from start to finish. Yellow Ball distributed compilations of short films and gained international fame. This program features many entertaining examples of the workshop's unique output.

    Cost: $10 for general public; $8 for non-Harvard students & seniors; free for Harvard ID holders

    ...

    Read more about Yvonne Andersen and the Yellow Ball Workshop: Films By Kids

    Screening: Expedition Content

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Expedition Content is an exploration in “decolonizing the archive” through deep listening. The nearly imageless film is constructed from recordings made in 1961 in West Papua by Michael Rockefeller who was part of an expedition organized by filmmaker, professor and HFA co-founder Robert Gardner. Without dismissing the endeavors of their forebears, Karel and Kusumaryati open up the cinematic and ethnographic space to allow for more points of view, for questions and reconsiderations.

    Cost: $10 for general public; $8 for non-Harvard students & seniors;...

    Read more about Screening: Expedition Content
    2022 Apr 28

    Mythical Creatures Scavenger Hunt

    11:00am to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join us to hunt for mythical creatures across the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture. Can you find a genie, merfolk, or a centaur? What might have inspired a cyclops or a piranha plant? Travel through the galleries of four museums on your quest for these amazing creatures. Test your skills in the galleries of the Harvard Museum of Natural History, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, and the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.

    On April 15, let the adventure begin! Time is limited, so plan...

    Read more about Mythical Creatures Scavenger Hunt

    Mythical Creatures Scavenger Hunt Kick-Off

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join us to hunt for mythical creatures across the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture. Can you find a genie, merfolk, or a centaur? What might have inspired a cyclops or a piranha plant? Travel through the galleries of four museums on your quest for these amazing creatures. Test your skills in the galleries of the Harvard Museum of Natural History, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, and the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.

    On April 15, let the adventure begin! Time is limited, so plan...

    Read more about Mythical Creatures Scavenger Hunt Kick-Off

    The Trouble with Tragedy: Imagining the Native American Past, Present, and Future

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP) and the Harvard Art Museums present a lecture by author David Treuer.

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe Indian, will offer a fresh and in-depth perspective on the current state of affairs for Native and Indigenous peoples in the Americas. Drawing from his experience growing up on the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and as an accomplished academic, Treuer’s work includes both nonfiction and fiction.

    ...

    Read more about The Trouble with Tragedy: Imagining the Native American Past, Present, and Future

    Spring 2022 George Parker Winship Lecture: "Documenting Indigenous Nations, War, and Peace"

    Location: 

    Houghton Library, Quincy St. & Harvard St., Cambridge

    The Spring 2022 George Parker Winship Lecture at Houghton Library will be given by Scholars at Risk and Harvard Library Fellow Binalakshmi Nepram. In 1949, Manipur—a southeast Asian nation state with a 2,000-year history—was forcibly “merged” with India. Still under martial law today, the history and culture of its Indigenous inhabitants have been suppressed through decades of state-sanctioned violence. In her lecture, "Documenting Indigenous Nations, War, and Peace: Discovering and Preserving the Stories, Struggles, and History of Manipur, Northeast India," Nepram will discuss efforts...

    Read more about Spring 2022 George Parker Winship Lecture: "Documenting Indigenous Nations, War, and Peace"

    In-Person Exhibition Tour: White Shadows: Anneliese Hager and the Camera-less Photograph

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Join curator Lynette Roth and artist T. Deutch for an in-depth tour of our special exhibition White Shadows: Anneliese Hager and the Camera-less Photograph, on view through July 31, 2022.

    German artist Anneliese Hager (1904–1997) made significant contributions to the medium of camera-less photography and to the wider surrealist movement in Europe. The camera-less photograph, or photogram, is an image made by placing objects directly on (or in close...

    Read more about In-Person Exhibition Tour: White Shadows: Anneliese Hager and the Camera-less Photograph

    Joan Nogué, "A Journey through Landscape: From Theory to Practice"

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Drawing from experience accumulated over 40 years of academic and professional trajectory on the question of landscape, as a university professor, director of the Landscape Observatory of Catalonia and ‘militant’ for landscape, Joan Nogué will reflect on the theory and practice of landscape today and into the future.

    Professor Nogué defends an integral conception of landscape that considers both the tangible and intangible elements. Such conception highlights the geohistorical singularity of landscape –every landscape belongs to a specific space and time– while acknowledging...

    Read more about Joan Nogué, "A Journey through Landscape: From Theory to Practice"

    Not Paved for Us: Black Educators and Public School Reform in Philadelphia

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    'Not Paved for Us' highlights the experiences of Black educators as they navigate the racial and cultural politics of urban school reform. Ultimately, urban education scholar Camika Royal names, dissects, and challenges the presence of racism in school reform policies and practices while calling for an antiracist future.

    Learn more about and register for this virtual event.

    Read more about Not Paved for Us: Black Educators and Public School Reform in Philadelphia

    Screening: Maidan

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    As the unjust war against Ukraine rages, the Harvard Film Archive offers Ukrainian filmmaker Sergei Loznitsa’s powerful portrait of popular resistance as a means to reflect on the deeper history of the war, and as a tribute to the courage of a nation that has long been in the geopolitical crosshairs.

    Cost: $10 for general public; $8 for non-Harvard students & seniors; free for Harvard ID holders

    ...

    Read more about Screening: Maidan

    In-Person Gallery Talk: Art and Human Health—An Evolutionary Perspective

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Join Ben Sibson, a graduate student at Harvard in human evolutionary biology, for a conversation about how art can enhance our understanding of the evolution of human health. Looking at works of art installed in the University Study Gallery this semester for the undergraduate course Human Evolution and Human Health, Sibson will show how the objects provide useful information about the physical activities performed by people across time and space, as well as the foods they ate, the clothes they wore, and the spaces where they lived.

    ...

    Read more about In-Person Gallery Talk: Art and Human Health—An Evolutionary Perspective

    Right Where We Belong: How Refugee Teachers and Students Are Changing the Future of Education

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Half of the world’s 26 million refugees are children. Their formal education is disrupted, and their lives are too often dominated by exclusion and uncertainty about what the future holds. Even kids who have the opportunity to attend school face enormous challenges, as they struggle to integrate into unfamiliar societies and educational environments.

    It turns out that policymakers, activists, and educators have a lot to learn from displaced children and teachers. Their stories point the way to better futures for refugee students and inspire us to reimagine education broadly,...

    Read more about Right Where We Belong: How Refugee Teachers and Students Are Changing the Future of Education

    Virtual Student Guide Tour: Painting’s Punchlines, with Sophia Clark

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In this tour, Sophia Clark ’23 explores the varied means and ends of humor in three works of art that, at first glance, may not seem funny. They are Mervin Jules’s 1937 painting The Art Lover; Charles Bird King’s 1830 painting The Vanity of the Artist’s Dream; and the Archaic Greek Eye cup: Athena (c. 530 BCE), which gives drinkers a different face...

    Read more about Virtual Student Guide Tour: Painting’s Punchlines, with Sophia Clark

Pages