Events

    The Stories We Tell and the Objects We Keep: Asian American Women and the Archives

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The stories of Asian American women extend far beyond the geographic borders of the United States. Inspired by tales and objects from family history, their narratives often reflect the transnational nature of Asian American women’s lives. Despite the importance of these narratives to expanding and complicating our understanding of war, migration, inequity, and difference, the accounts and perspectives of Asian American women have often been overlooked in formal records, and the tangible objects providing critical evidence of their histories have been ignored. This program will bring...

    Read more about The Stories We Tell and the Objects We Keep: Asian American Women and the Archives

    The History of Structural Racism in Charlottesville: Legally-Enforced Segregation and Its Impact on Health

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    Using Charlottesville as a case study, Dayna Bowen Matthew, JD, PhD, Dean and Harold H. Greene Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School, explores the theory, mechanisms, and impact on health of legally-mandated residential segregation and how we can identify and redress historical inequities.

    ...

    Read more about The History of Structural Racism in Charlottesville: Legally-Enforced Segregation and Its Impact on Health

    The Politics of Health Policy: Integrating Racial Justice into Health Care and Clinical Research

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    What are political determinants of health? How have they driven inequities in the U.S. health care system? Daniel Dawes, JD, director of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute Morehouse School of Medicine, shares an inclusive approach to addressing health issues impacting the most vulnerable populations in an increasingly complex...

    Read more about The Politics of Health Policy: Integrating Racial Justice into Health Care and Clinical Research

    Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation

    Location: 

    Harvard Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History—Online

    Join a post-election conversation with Latosha Brown, Black Voters Matter) and Warren Center American Democracy Fellow. 

    Moderated by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy, HKS; Suzanne Young Murray Professor, Radcliffe.

    Learn more and RSVP for Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation.

    Read more about Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation

    Enduring Unethical Lessons from the Past: Learning from the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    The United States Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee is used as a case study of the exploitation of communities of color at the hands of medical professionals. What are the lessons learned and how far has medical ethics really come in terms of the treatment of Black and other communities of color? Lillie Head, president of Voices for Our Fathers Legacy Foundation, and Riggins R. Earl, Jr...

    Read more about Enduring Unethical Lessons from the Past: Learning from the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee

    Protest as Politics: African American Young Adults, Reimagining Democracy

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    During these unprecedented times, we have watched young people—a great many of them African Americans—taking to the streets in all 50 states in support of justice for George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, while also seeking to address the current failures of policing, criminal justice, and the economy; as well as the existence of white supremacy and anti-Blackness. How does the precarious position of African American young adults facilitate a reimagining of democracy? What does this reimagining mean for American politics?

    ...

    Read more about Protest as Politics: African American Young Adults, Reimagining Democracy

    Election 2020: Youth in Power

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    Join the Institute of Politics for a discussion on the unprecedented turnout and impact from young voters 18–29 years old.

    Ashley Allison, former National Coalitions Director for Biden for President, and Peter Hamby, host of Snapchat’s Good Luck America and contributing writer for Vanity Fair, will join in a conversation moderated by John Della Volpe, Director of Polling at the Institute of Politics who was on leave in the fall semester from the Harvard Youth Poll to advise the Biden-Harris campaign. They will examine Biden’s communications and organizing strategy from the end...

    Read more about Election 2020: Youth in Power

    Reimagining Museums: Disruption and Change

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    As museums have acknowledged their legacy as colonial institutions, many have reimagined their mission as agents of decolonization and social justice. The pandemic disruption, the Black Lives Matter movement, and other community issues are driving still more rapid and drastic changes and providing opportunities for reflection and growth.

    How can American museums—especially those that have strong relationships with Indigenous communities—respond to current national conditions of social unrest and political turmoil? How have New England museums fared and what is likely to happen...

    Read more about Reimagining Museums: Disruption and Change

    Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    “What college does, it helps us learn about the nation,” said Rodney Spivey-Jones, a 2017 Bard College graduate currently incarcerated at Fishkill Correctional Facility in New York, in the docuseries College behind Bars. “It helps us become civic beings. It helps us understand that we have an interest in our community, that our community is a part of us and we are a part of it.”

    The Bard Prison Initiative and programs at other institutions of higher learning across the country have brought together teachers and learners in incarcerated spaces for years. This panel will gather...

    Read more about Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    By the early 1980s, a new political landscape was taking shape that would fundamentally influence American society and politics in the decades to come. That year, the long-standing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—championed by suffragist Alice Paul and introduced to Congress in 1923—ran aground, owing in significant measure to the activism of women who pioneered a new brand of conservatism.

    This panel will draw together strands and stories that are often kept separate: the ideas and growing influence of conservative women, the political activism of gay communities...

    Read more about New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    The first person who will set foot on Mars is alive right now. We believe this, but even if we're wrong we know the first crew to arrive there will look nothing like the ones that landed on the Moon fifty years ago.

    Our world has changed for the better, and ASTRONAUTS tells the story of the women who built this better world. The main character and narrator is Mary Cleave, an astronaut you may not have heard of. It's not because so many people have been to space; only a few hundred have! It’s because this graphic novel isn’t about fame. No astronaut you'll ever meet took the...

    Read more about Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier

    On Account of Sex (1920)

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 did not "give" women the vote. Rather, it established a negative: that the right to vote could not be abridged on account of sex alone. This session brings together diverse participants who will each illuminate one facet of women’s political history at this key transitional moment. Together, participants will emphasize the radical achievement of the amendment, exploring the full implications of what it meant to remove sex as a barrier to voting, which resulted in the largest-ever one-time expansion of the electorate and mobilized a...

    Read more about On Account of Sex (1920)

    Race and Economic Justice

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center—Online via YouTube Live

    Please join the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy for its signature weekly series this fall, The Fierce Urgency of Now, featuring Black, Indigenous, People of Color scholars, activists, and community leaders, and experts from the Global South. Hosted and facilitated by Sushma Raman and Mathias Risse, the series also aligns with a course they will co-teach this fall at the Harvard Kennedy School on Economic Justice: Theory and Practice.

    Panelists: Brandon M. Terry | Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies and Social Studies,...

    Read more about Race and Economic Justice

    What Studying Putin’s Russia Can Teach Us about the United States: Masculinity, Misogyny, and U.S. Elections in the Trump Era

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    Vladimir Putin has long been known for his macho displays, and Donald Trump for his misogynist pronouncements. In both the U.S. and Russia, machismo and misogyny play fundamental roles in politics; the former is used to legitimize particular politicians as strong leaders, and the latter to undermine opponents as weak. In their lecture, while drawing parallels to Russia, Professors Robert Boatright and Valerie Sperling will focus on their new book about masculinity and misogyny in the U.S. political context, exploring how Donald Trump’s misogyny in the 2016 presidential race changed the...

    Read more about What Studying Putin’s Russia Can Teach Us about the United States: Masculinity, Misogyny, and U.S. Elections in the Trump Era

    Observatory Night: What Stars Are Made Of

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    Join the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian for a virtual Public Observatory Night with guest lecturer Donavan Moore, author of "What Stars Are Made Of: The Life of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin."

    It was not easy being a woman of ambition in early twentieth-century England, much less one who wished to be a scientist. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin overcame prodigious obstacles to become a woman of many firsts: the first to receive a PhD in astronomy from Radcliffe College, the first promoted to full professor at Harvard, the first to head a department there. And, in what...

    Read more about Observatory Night: What Stars Are Made Of

    Perfecters of This Democracy: A Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    Nikole Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter and creator of the 1619 Project, will engage in conversation with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, about pressing issues of race, civil rights, injustice, desegregation, and resegregation.

    ...

    Read more about Perfecters of This Democracy: A Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones

    Getting Out the BIPOC Vote: Digital Strategies to Build Power

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Ash Center

    Activists and practitioners were already preparing for a tumultuous election year before the COVID-19 pandemic hit our shores. Now, the months ahead present immense challenges—and opportunities—for redefining how civic engagement is practiced for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities.

    Join the Harvard Kennedy School for a timely discussion with leading practitioners who are effectively integrating digital strategies with authentic power-building while navigating a never-before-seen civic environment. All share a mission of giving real agency to vulnerable...

    Read more about Getting Out the BIPOC Vote: Digital Strategies to Build Power

    Webinar: The Labor of Fashion, the Global COVID-19 Crisis, and the Politics of Resistance in Bangladesh

    Location: 

    Online Event

    The global apparel industry is currently facing an unprecedented crisis resulting from the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. Major fashion retailers in the Global North are closing their stores and laying off workers. The same brands that demonstrated strong public commitment for protecting the safety and security of Bangladeshi garment workers after the Rana Plaza collapse in 2013 are not hesitating to cancel or suspend orders or delay payments. Thousands of workers are currently out of work and facing a unique livelihood, as well as a health threat. 

    Bangladeshi local labor...

    Read more about Webinar: The Labor of Fashion, the Global COVID-19 Crisis, and the Politics of Resistance in Bangladesh

    The End of the World as We Know It? Russia and Ukraine Confront and Challenge Change

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    The year 2019 has not turned out as expected for the political elite in Russia and Ukraine. Local elections in Russia have triggered stubborn street protests set amidst falling living standards. In Ukraine, political neophyte and comedian Zelensky has been rapidly consolidating power—though whether he can resolve Ukraine’s numerous political, economic, and geopolitical problems remains to be seen.

    Join the Davis Center as Harvard’s top specialists on Russia and Ukraine discuss contemporary developments in Eurasia and their import for the rest of the world.

    ...

    Read more about The End of the World as We Know It? Russia and Ukraine Confront and Challenge Change

Pages