Events

    2020 Jul 27

    Virtual Summer Science Week: Ins & Outs of Skeletons (Session 1)

    Repeats every day until Fri Jul 31 2020 .
    9:30am

    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

    Investigate the ins and outs of skeletons through a virtual museum experience. Using observations of skulls, bones, and live animals, we will explore how animals use their skeletons for support, protection, and movement, and see how bones and fossils can help us solve ancient mysteries. Extend the fun at home with daily activities. A small packet of materials will be sent to your home upon registration.

    Additional supplies needed: Thin cardboard-like poster board about 11" x 11" or two cardboard paper towel rolls, kitchen string, strong tape 3/4" wide or narrower (electrical...

    Read more about Virtual Summer Science Week: Ins & Outs of Skeletons (Session 1)
    2020 Jul 20

    Virtual Summer Science Week: Earth Explorers (Session 2)

    Repeats every day until Fri Jul 24 2020 .
    9:30am

    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

    Dig into Earth Science with this virtual museum experience. Explore volcanoes, crystals, and fossils! During the live Zoom sessions, experiment with “lava,” solve a sandy mystery, and see real museum specimens. Continue your investigations at home as you grow crystals, collect rocks, and make your own fossils! A small packet of special materials will be sent to your home to help with your discoveries.

    Additional supplies needed: An empty clear plastic jar with a lid (for example, a cleaned peanut butter or mayonnaise jar), a handful of small rocks (will be used for an activity...

    Read more about Virtual Summer Science Week: Earth Explorers (Session 2)
    2020 Jul 13

    Virtual Summer Science Week: Earth Explorers (Session 1)

    Repeats every day until Fri Jul 17 2020 .
    9:30am

    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

    Dig into Earth Science with this virtual museum experience. Explore volcanoes, crystals, and fossils! During the live Zoom sessions, experiment with “lava,” solve a sandy mystery, and see real museum specimens. Continue your investigations at home as you grow crystals, collect rocks, and make your own fossils! A small packet of special materials will be sent to your home to help with your discoveries.

    Additional supplies needed: An empty clear plastic jar with a lid (for example, a cleaned peanut butter or mayonnaise jar), a handful of small rocks (will be used for an activity...

    Read more about Virtual Summer Science Week: Earth Explorers (Session 1)
    2020 Jun 22

    Virtual Summer Science Week: Spineless Wonders (Session 1)

    Repeats every weekday until Fri Jun 26 2020 .
    9:30am

    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am
    9:30am

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

    Come explore the amazing world of insects, spiders, and other invertebrates, virtually, at the museum! During the live Zoom sessions, see a tarantula up close, help find millipedes, and listen to the hiss of a giant cockroach. Complete your own investigations at home as you learn how to collect and study creepy crawlies. A small packet of special collecting materials will be sent to your home to help with your discoveries.

    Additional supplies needed: An empty clear plastic jar with a lid and holes for insect collecting (for example, a cleaned peanut butter or mayonnaise jar);...

    Read more about Virtual Summer Science Week: Spineless Wonders (Session 1)
    2019 Nov 07

    Adversity, Belonging, and Survival Among Baboons

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Museum of Natural History for a public lecture with Susan Alberts, Robert F. Durden Professor of Biology and Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University. 

    The social environment—both in early life and adulthood—has major effects on human health and survival. But how and why does the social environment get “under the skin” to also affect our physical health? Susan Alberts pursues this question by studying wild baboons in Kenya. Baboons, like humans, evolved as savannah dwellers. They rely on social relationships to solve problems and—like humans...

    Read more about Adversity, Belonging, and Survival Among Baboons
    2019 Oct 26

    Fabulous Fungus Fair

    2:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Explore the wondrous world of fungi! Join Harvard students for a closer look at the mushrooms, yeasts, and molds found in gardens, forests, and labs—even in our own refrigerators. This is an opportunity to investigate fungal diversity and participate in hands-on activities led by Harvard students.

    Note: Regular museum admission rates apply.

    Learn more about Fabulous Fungus Fair.

    Read more about Fabulous Fungus Fair
    2019 Oct 21

    Voices of the Rainforest

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, Menschel Hall, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Voices of the Rainforest is an experiential documentary about the ecological and aesthetic coevolution of Papua New Guinea’s Bosavi rainforest region and its inhabitants. The film immerses viewers in the rainforest, making myriad connections between the everyday sounds of the rainforest biosphere and the creative practices of the Bosavi people who sing to, with, and about it.

    Following the screening, Steven Feld will discuss the film with Amahl Bishara, an associate professor of anthropology at Tufts University.

    ...

    Read more about Voices of the Rainforest
    2019 Oct 06

    Reptile Day

    11:00am to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Celebrate reptiles! Join Harvard students from the Harvard College Conservation Society for a variety of reptile themed activities including a scavenger hunt, storytime, and crafts. Come learn about the history and diversity of reptiles, and why they need to be conserved! All ages are welcome.

    Please note: Regular museum admission rates apply.

    Learn more about Reptile Day.

    Read more about Reptile Day
    2019 Jul 13

    Exploring Science Together: Bugs!

    10:30am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Take a closer look and explore the world of minuscule bugs! Learn through hands-on activities designed to show you how to classify and identify these numerous and diverse creatures! Participate in activities in our incredible arthropods gallery. Observe and touch live invertebrates, and then go outside and collect some of your own. Dig in the dirt and learn how invertebrates help people compost food waste into soil. Create your own scientific equipment that will help you continue the study of entomology at home.

    All activities are designed to be fun and interactive experiences...

    Read more about Exploring Science Together: Bugs!
    2019 May 22

    Ethnobotany at Harvard

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Herbaria, 22 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

    Historically, plants have provided humans with most of our drugs, fibers, food, dyes, perfumes, building materials, and even musical instruments. But how has this diverse and fascinating field been studied and what has been learned? In fact, for over 100 years, Harvard has played a pivotal role in the study of human-plant interactions, leading to the creation of the field of ethnobotany.

    In this interactive lecture we will explore the science and history of some of the most important Harvard botanists and explorers through their unique specimens—now housed in the Harvard...

    Read more about Ethnobotany at Harvard
    2019 Apr 23

    Film Screening: Lobster War: The Fight Over the World's Richest Fishing Grounds

    6:00pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Lobster War is an award-winning documentary film about a conflict between the United States and Canada over waters that both countries have claimed since the end of the Revolutionary War. The disputed 277 square miles of sea known as the Gray Zone were traditionally fished by U.S. lobstermen. But as the Gulf of Maine has warmed faster than nearly any other body of water on the planet, the area’s previously modest lobster population has surged. As a result, Canadians have begun to assert their sovereignty, warring with the Americans to claim the bounty.

    Directed...

    Read more about Film Screening: Lobster War: The Fight Over the World's Richest Fishing Grounds
    2019 Apr 10

    Lecture: Chasing Ants (And Their Microbes) in the Rainforest

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Microbes play critical roles in the biology and health of human beings, but we are not the only species that benefits from intimate relationships with microbes. Ants, for instance, rely on the microbial communities living in their guts to process food and make strong armor.

    Corrie Moreau will discuss this unique aspect of ant biology and what it tells us about the diversity and dominance of ants in terrestrial ecosystems, the evolutionary history of social insects, and the broad-scale evolutionary patterns of life.

    ...

    Read more about Lecture: Chasing Ants (And Their Microbes) in the Rainforest
    2019 Apr 09

    Lecture: Self-Domestication in Bonobos and Other Wild Animals

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Domesticated animals such as dogs, pigs, and horses often sport floppy ears, patches of white hair, and other features that are unknown in their wild ancestors. These traits—collectively referred to by scientists as a “domestication syndrome”—are the result of breeding less aggressive individuals.

    Drawing from his new book, The Goodness Paradox (2019, Pantheon Books), Richard Wrangham will show that our cousin apes, the bonobos, also exhibit a domestication syndrome, making them the first clear example of a “wild domesticate.” Self-domestication in the wild now seems...

    Read more about Lecture: Self-Domestication in Bonobos and Other Wild Animals
    2019 Apr 02

    Living with White Sharks

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The Cape Cod white shark population has increased in recent years in response to the dramatic increase in the seal population. Shark sightings—some close to popular swimming and surfing beaches—are becoming more frequent and negative interactions between sharks and humans have become a real concern.

    Gregory Skomal has studied and tracked white sharks in the Atlantic for more than 30 years. In this lecture, he will examine the behavior, ecology, natural history, and population dynamics of this species, and how scientific research can help sharks and humans coexist in the Cape...

    Read more about Living with White Sharks
    2019 Feb 20

    The Amazonian Travels of Richard Evans Schultes

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Richard Evans Schultes—ethnobotanist, taxonomist, writer, photographer, and Harvard professor—is regarded as one of the most important plant explorers of the twentieth century. In 1941, Schultes traveled to the Amazon rainforest on a mission to study how Indigenous peoples used plants for medicinal, ritual, and practical purposes. A new interactive online map, produced by the Amazon Conservation Team, traces the landscapes and cultures that Schultes explored in the Colombian Amazon. Plotkin and Hettler will share this map and discuss the relevance of Schultes’ travels and...

    Read more about The Amazonian Travels of Richard Evans Schultes
    2018 Nov 14

    Origins of the Green Revolution: Hybrid Seeds, Hunger, and Mexico-India Cooperation

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University

    As a devastating famine gripped India and Pakistan in 1966, a cargo of hybrid wheat seeds from Mexico arrived one fateful day on India’s coast. The seeds were first planted across the Punjab region using new...

    Read more about Origins of the Green Revolution: Hybrid Seeds, Hunger, and Mexico-India Cooperation
    2018 Oct 27

    Fabulous Fungus Fair

    2:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Explore the wondrous world of fungi! Join Harvard students for a closer look at the mushrooms, yeasts, and molds found in gardens, forests, labs—even in our own refrigerators. This is an opportunity to investigate museum collections and participate in hands-on activities led by Harvard students.

    Learn more about Fabulous Fungus Fair....

    Read more about Fabulous Fungus Fair
    2018 Oct 26

    The Undiscovered

    9:00am to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA

    To paraphrase Louis Pasteur, sometimes luck favors the prepared mind, as when Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin by noticing that mold growing accidentally in his lab seemed to kill bacteria. This 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium will focus on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science will present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

    ...

    Read more about The Undiscovered
    2018 Oct 20

    Exhibition: The Rockefeller Beetles

    Repeats every day until Fri Nov 30 2018 .
    (All day)

    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)
    (All day)

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Over the span of 90 years, banker and philanthropist David Rockefeller collected beetles from around the world, eventually building a personal collection of more than 150,000 specimens. In 2017, his longstanding support for the entomology department of the Harvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology culminated in a gift to the museum of this extraordinary collection. Join the Harvard Museum of Natural History in celebrating this invaluable gift with a visit to The Rockefeller Beetles—a new exhibit that will feature hundreds of specimens from Rockefeller’s collection and recount the...

    Read more about Exhibition: The Rockefeller Beetles
    2018 Oct 18

    Quantum Tools to Explore the Universe…and Help Life on Earth

    7:30pm

    Location: 

    60 Garden Street, Phillips Auditorium, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138

    At the Center for Astrophysics, we exploit quantum physics to advance the state-of-the-art in measurement and imaging, and then apply these tools to search for Earth-like planets around other stars and probe the nature, history, and fate of the Universe. Sometimes, these quantum tools can also be applied to down-to-Earth problems — ranging from health to navigation. 

    Learn more about Quantum Tools to Explore the Universe…and Help Life on Earth.

    Read more about Quantum Tools to Explore the Universe…and Help Life on Earth

Pages