Events

    2022 Feb 23

    Everything That Doctors Want to Know About Reproductive Rights Litigation, But Are Too Afraid to Ask

    12:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Current and past abortion legislation and court rulings have profound effects on health care providers’ ability to care for their patients. However, media coverage of abortion in the U.S. typically is not geared toward an audience of health care professionals. Health care providers are thus left on their own to grapple with questions of what they can or cannot do within the scope of ever-changing law and policy.

    This event aims to address that gap, answering the questions health care providers might have about legal doctrine around abortion and what it means for their practice...

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    2022 Feb 16

    Book Talk: Civic Education in the Age of Mass Migration

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Immigration Initiative at Harvard—Online

    Dr. Angela M. Banks will discuss her recent book Civic Education in the Age of Mass Migration: Implications for Theory and Practice.

    Angela M. Banks is a legal scholar specializing in membership and belonging in democratic societies. She is the Charles J. Merriam Distinguished Professor of law at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is the author of...

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    2022 Feb 15

    Benin Bronzes in Context

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    In Benin Bronzes in Context, Sarah Clunis will look at objects currently in the care of Harvard and discuss the way that these objects represent an iconographic and contextual story of trade, contact, and crossroads between cultures. Diana Loren will moderate a discussion after the presentation.

    The bronze, ivory, and wooden artworks broadly known as the “Benin Bronzes” were taken from Benin City as part of the British Punitive Expedition of 1897 and dispersed to private collections and museums around the world. The Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology...

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    2022 Feb 15

    Why the Mississippi Delta Matters

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    W. Ralph Eubanks is a visiting professor and writer-in-residence at the University of Mississippi, where he is affiliated with the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. Join Eubanks as he discusses his upcoming book, which weaves together personal history, archival research, reporting, blues and popular culture, and interviews with current Delta residents to tell the region’s history and explore why many residents of this iconic region of Mississippi persist in trying to transform a place that has been deemed broken and beyond repair.

    ...

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    2022 Feb 15

    Shrinking Civic Space in Africa: Lessons from Uganda

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy—Online

    In this talk, Nicholas Opiyo—Carr Center Fellow, Scholar at Risk, and Human Rights Lawyer in Uganda—will analyze and explore the state arguments that have been made for limitations on the civic space in Africa. Throughout the discussion, he will trace relevant trends and examine the role of the international community in Africa’s political spheres. Noting that there are possible ways to push back against the shrinking of civic space, Opiyo will suggest new ways for civil society to organize effectively.

    ...

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    2022 Feb 15

    Lakefront: Public Trust and Private Rights in Chicago

    12:30pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    How did Chicago, a city known for commerce, come to have such a splendid public waterfront—its most treasured asset? The book’s authors study the lakefront’s evolution from the middle of the nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Their findings have significance for understanding not only Chicago’s history but also the law’s part in determining the future of significant urban resources such as waterfronts.

    Join us for a discussion on Lakefront: Public Trust and Private Rights in Chicago with authors Joseph Kearney and Thomas Merrill and panelists Henry Smith, Richard...

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    2022 Feb 15

    Afghanistan After the Collapse: Where Are We Now, and What Comes Next?

    11:00am to 12:15pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    On the six-month anniversary of the Taliban’s swift takeover of Afghanistan, this Negotiation Task Force virtual event, moderated by NTF Fellow Fara Abbas, explores Afghanistan under Taliban rule. Together with our expert panel of speakers, we will address the political, economic, and security developments in Afghanistan and the way forward. The consequences of a Taliban failure to govern are far reaching.

    This event will address the following questions: What can be expected from the...

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    2022 Feb 11

    Great Zimbabwe: Reclaiming a 'Confiscated' Past

    1:00pm to 2:30pm

    Location: 

    Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard—Online

    This lecture is part of the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Alumni Fellows Virtual Reading Series.

     

    Shadreck Chirikure, Professor of Archaeology, University of Cape Town and British Academy Global Professor, School of Archaeology, Oxford University in conversation with Chakanetsa Mavhunga, Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, MIT.

    ...

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    2022 Feb 10

    Peril to Democracy: Racism and Nationalism in America

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    The after effects of the January 6 insurrection continue to reverberate across America. Since that fateful and disturbing day, pushbacks against the teaching of race in America, abortion rollbacks, and Covid denialism have swept across the country. What has been the role of evangelical Christianity in fueling these issues?

    Professor Anthea Butler's lecture will explore the historical antecedents of Evangelical beliefs and political action leading up to today’s troubling times, and the prospects for the future of religion, peace and political action in America.

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    2022 Feb 09

    Education Now: Navigating Tensions Over Teaching Race and Racism

    3:00pm to 3:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    How can schools, educators, and families navigate the continued politicization and tensions around teaching and talking about race, racism, diversity, and equity? As laws banning critical race theory are passed, and the rhetoric grows intense, we'll discuss what educators and families can do to make sure students are supported, learning, and prepared with the knowledge they need to understand their own histories and the diverse and global society they’ll enter.

    ...

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    2022 Feb 07

    Precipitation for an Arid Landscape Opening Discussion

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    In this opening discussion for Radcliffe’s contemporary art exhibition, Precipitation for an Arid Landscape, the artist Gala Porras-Kim will engage in a wide-ranging conversation with art historian Martha Buskirk. The exhibition grows out of Porras-Kim’s 2019–2020 fellowship at Harvard Radcliffe Institute. Her fellowship project centered on items dredged from the Sacred Cenote of Chichén Itzá, a Maya site in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, and how they arrived in the collections of Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

    ...

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    2022 Feb 04

    Patricia Sullivan, 'Justice Rising: Robert Kennedy’s America in Black and White'

    1:00pm

    Location: 

    Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard—Online

    Former Hutchins Center Fellows discuss their recent works in. the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Alumni Fellows Virtual Reading Series.

    Patricia Sullivan, Professor of History, University of South Carolina, in conversation with Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School.

    Learn more and register for this virtual event.

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    2022 Feb 03

    Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Humanities with Midori

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The 2022 Kim and Judy Davis Dean’s Lecture in the Humanities will feature Midori—artist, activist, and educator who explores and builds connections between music and the human experience, which makes her one of the most outstanding violinists of our time. She has performed with many of the world’s most prestigious orchestras and has collaborated with world-renowned musicians, including Leonard Bernstein, Yo-Yo Ma, and many others.

    ...

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    2021 Nov 19

    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 3)

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    The new genre of interior painting enjoyed great popularity among 17th-century Dutch citizens. Its indoor scenes featuring people involved in mundane activities resemble the domestic settings in which they were hung. Other art forms such as perspective boxes and dollhouses further reinforce the link connecting physical, pictorial, and mental space by relating home to the interiority of the individual.

    ...

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    2021 Nov 19

    Film Screening: The Airstrip

    Fri Nov 19 (All day) to Mon Nov 22 (All day)

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive—Online

    In collaboration with the Harvard Art Museums' current exhibit Devour the Land, the Harvard Film Archive presents a program of films that critically engage landscape as a site where deeper political, socio-cultural and historical forces are powerfully legible.

    The Airstrip is a profound study of the heavy legacy of modernist architecture that traces its deep roots in the fascist ideologies and militarist imperatives that rose to strength in the WWII era and continue to gain strength to this day.

    Cost: $10 / Free for Harvard affiliates....

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    2021 Nov 18

    Reconstructing Queen Amanishakheto’s Musical Instruments

    6:00pm to 7:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Double reed pipes, known as auloi, were popular musical instruments in the ancient Mediterranean. In 1921, archaeologists exploring the necropolis of Meroë (northern Sudan)—as part of the Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition—found a large collection of auloi in the pyramid of Nubian Queen Amanishakheto. Susanne Gänsicke will discuss the discovery’s importance and what it reveals about the connections between Nubia and the Mediterranean world as well as the significance of far-reaching musical traditions. She will also share recent efforts to conserve...

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    2021 Nov 17

    Useful Objects: Nineteenth-Century Museums and American Culture

    4:30pm to 5:45pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    What can the history of museums tell us about their role in American culture today? What kinds of objects were considered worth collecting, and who decided their value? Join Reed Gochberg, author of Useful Objects: Museums, Science, and Literature in Nineteenth-Century America (Oxford University Press, September 2021) to learn about the early history of American museums, including Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology. In conversation with HMSC...

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