Events

    2021 Feb 02

    Fearing the Worst: How the Korean War Transformed the Cold War

    12:15pm to 1:45pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system. Fearing the Worst explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades.

    Samuel F. Wells Jr. examines how military and political events interacted to escalate the conflict. Decisions made by the Truman administration in the first six months of the...

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    2021 Feb 02

    Building a Large-Scale SARS-CoV-2 Test Lab: Scientific and Leadership Lessons

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    Stacey Gabriel, PhD, senior director of the Genomics Platform at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, led the Broad’s COVID-era pivot to becoming one of the foremost SARS-CoV-2 testing centers in the country (now closing in on nine million tests performed). Realizing this vision in such a short time frame required strong leadership skills, as well as the ability to solve myriad technological, supply chain, IT and clinical workflow challenges. In this webinar, Stacey Gabriel will share her behind-the-scenes perspectives about the keys to her organization’s...

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    2021 Feb 02

    Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard—Online

    Book Panel on Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic by Álvaro Santana-Acuña

    Gabriel García Márquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude seemed destined for obscurity upon its publication in 1967. The little-known author, small publisher, magical style, and setting in a remote Caribbean village were hardly the usual ingredients for success in the literary marketplace. Yet today it ranks among the best-selling books of all time. Translated into dozens of languages, it continues to enter the lives...

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    2021 Feb 01

    What Does Public Service Mean To You?

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Center for Public Leadership—Online

    Public service comes in many forms. Whether through non-profits, government, or the military, our students have served in diverse ways all across the globe. Following a special introduction by CPL director Amb. Wendy R. Sherman, hear from three of the Kennedy School's own in a discussion over the different forms of public service as we kick off Public Service Week.

    PANELISTS:

    Hassaan Ebrahim MPP 2021, CEO, Hikma Health
    Charlene Han MC/MPA 2021, Former Policy Director, Singapore Ministry of Social and Family Development
    Bill Walker MC/MPA 2021, Former Marine...

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    2021 Feb 01

    Psychedelics: The Ancient Religion with No Name?

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    The most influential religious historian of the 20th century, Huston Smith, once referred to it as the "best-kept secret" in history. Did the ancient Greeks use drugs to find God? And did the earliest Christians inherit the same secret tradition? A profound knowledge of visionary plants, herbs, and fungi passed from one generation to the next, ever since the Stone Age? Join us for a discussion between CSWR Director Charles Stang and Brian Muraresku about his new book, The Immortality Key: The Secret History of the Religion with No Name, a groundbreaking dive into the role of psychedelics...

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    2021 Feb 01

    Mahindra Humanities Center Medieval Studies Seminar

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Committee on Medieval Studies—Online

    A Playground for Poets: author Maria Dahvana Headley discusses her new translation of Beowulf (Farrar Strauss Giroux, 2019) with Daniel Donoghue, John P. Marquand Professor of English and Chair of the Standing Committee on Medieval Studies. Co-sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center Rethinking Translation Seminar and the Harvard...

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    2021 Feb 01

    ‘A Catalyst for Humanity’: A Conversation with Isabel Wilkerson

    1:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health—Online

    What are the invisible social strata that define and divide America? How does this unseen ranking underlie racism? And how do caste dynamics systematically lessen the value of Black lives? Join Pulitzer Prize winner Isabel Wilkerson, author of Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, and esteemed social scientist David Williams for a conversation about embedded power inequities–and their cost to us all. Moderated by CNN anchor, Don Lemon.

    ...

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    2021 Feb 01

    Human Rights and the Future World Order

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    The issue of human rights presents a special challenge for any effort to construct a workable world order. Can democracies and their publics remain true to their stated values within a world where human rights abuses are still widespread, without meddling into other nations' domestic political affairs or presuming to know exactly how to achieve these ends globally? To what extent will differences over basic notions of human rights undermine efforts to cooperate on trade, climate, arms control, or other pressing global problems?

    ...

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    2021 Jan 29

    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: Art & Technology 3,500 Years Ago

    11:00am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In the mid-second millennium BCE, sculptors, painters, potters, and glass- and metalworkers were busy in the northern Mesopotamian town of Nuzi (Iraq). Some of their products are in the collection of the Harvard Art Museums, which supported excavations at the site between 1925 and 1931. In this online talk, conservation scientist Katherine Eremin and curator Susanne Ebbinghaus will discuss the discovery of these objects and how technical study over decades has revealed the secrets of their making, as well as plans for future display.

    ...

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    2021 Jan 28

    Racial Equity in Urban Climate Action

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Arnold Arboretum

    Joan Fitzgerald, Professor of Urban Planning and Policy at Northeastern University, will build on key concepts in her new book, Greenovation: Urban Leadership on Climate Change (2020). She’ll discuss how cities are rethinking their approach to climate action by placing racial justice at the forefront. She’ll draw from recent experiences with Providence, Austin, and Oakland in creating participatory planning processes and new priorities for a just transition to a carbon-free society. She’ll conclude by discussing how the transition can be linked to jobs in the green economy.

    ...

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    2021 Jan 22

    The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout: What’s Ahead?

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    As the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines unfolds in the United States, numerous questions around distribution, supply, hesitancy, and efficacy persist. And the stakes have never been higher, as numbers of deaths and cases repeatedly break records. In this discussion, experts will review the COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan, address safety concerns, explore upcoming expected vaccines, and discuss implications of virus variants.

    ...

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    2021 Jan 21

    Art Talk Live: Setting the Fans Afloat

    2:00pm to 2:30pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Art Museums

    Exhibition designer Elie Glyn and production specialist Sean Lunsford will explain the creative process behind the planning and installation of a display of framed fans by Suzuki Kiitsu, featured in the special exhibition Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection.

    Led by:
    Elie Glyn, Assistant Director for Exhibitions, Collections Management
    Sean Lunsford, Exhibition Production Specialist, Collections Management...

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    2021 Jan 14

    Art Talk Live: Ben Shahn and Folk Music

    2:00pm to 2:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    During the Great Depression, artist Ben Shahn produced hundreds of photographs while working for the Farm Security Administration. Among his most common subjects were musicians. In this talk, curatorial fellow Kappy Mintie will examine Shahn’s interest in folk music in the context of concurrent government efforts to record this important strand of American music.

    Led by:
    Katherine “Kappy” Mintie, John R. and Barbara Robinson Family Curatorial Fellow in Photography, Division of Modern and Contemporary Art

    ...

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    2021 Jan 07

    Art Talk Live: Love at the Margins

    2:00pm to 2:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Members of the itinerant Roma, or Romani, people arrived in Europe by the Middle Ages and have held a prominent place in Western art and literature, from the work of Shakespeare and Hieronymus Bosch to that of the many Roma artists and writers active today. This talk will focus on an unusual and moving depiction of a Roma woman and child by Dutch artist Jacques de Gheyn, exploring it in relation to the broader visual and literary tradition and to the realities of the lives of the Roma in the 17th-century Netherlands.

    Led by:
    Joanna Sheers Seidenstein,...

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    2020 Dec 17

    Art Talk Live: Erased!

    2:00pm to 2:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Public images of rulers serve as potent symbols of power and propaganda. In ancient Rome, tyrannical emperors were deposed and assassinated, their likenesses defaced by angry citizens and sometimes by official decree.

    This talk is part of a series investigating power dynamics in artworks across the collections. Considering intersections of art and power, our curatorial team discusses how artists engage with social and political crises, use art to upset systems of power, and imagine more equitable futures.

    ...

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    2020 Dec 17

    US Health Policy After the 2020 Election

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    The 2020 election will have profound effects on the direction of U.S. health policy. Harvard Medical School physician and health economist Zirui Song, MD, PhD, will outline the potential implications of the election results on health insurance coverage, payment policy for health care providers, and key considerations for the Medicare and privately-insured population.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

    ...

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    2020 Dec 16

    Antique Inspirations, Fresh Creations

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    James S. Snyder, HKS/MEI Senior Fellow, in conversation with award-winning Palestinian-Israeli architect Senan Abdelqader on the influences of Arab culture across time on art, architecture, and design in Israel, Palestine, and the world today. This event is part of the fall 2020 MEI series, James Snyder in Conversation: A series of dialogues on art, culture, politics, and the possibilities for transcending conflict through cultural connection in the modern Middle East.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

    ...

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    2020 Dec 15

    Book Talk: Exposed: Why Our Health Insurance Is Incomplete and What Can Be Done About It

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Reshaping health insurance is a divisive topic in American politics today. Our current system expects patients to bear substantial health costs through deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance, creating a tradeoff for patients that can keep them from accessing the care they need. In his book, Exposed: Why Our Health Insurance Is Incomplete and What Can Be Done about It,...

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    2020 Dec 14

    Author Discussion with Francis X. Clooney, S.J.: Reading the Hindu and Christian Classics: Why and How Deep Learning Still Matters

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Please join us as Francis X. Clooney, S.J., HDS Parkman Professor of Divinity and Professor of Comparative Theology, discusses his recent publication, Reading the Hindu and Christian Classics: Why and How Deep Learning Still Matters.

    Jon D. Levenson (HDS) and Sarah Coakley (Australian Catholic University) will serve as respondents. 

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

    ...

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    2020 Dec 12

    A Materials Wonderland: A Celebration of How Materials Science Makes our Holidays Fun

    1:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences—Online

    Join us for a virtual celebration of materials, and their importance in our lives. Professor Howard Stone and team will investigate the wonders of common materials, and delve into the science of some materials that make our holidays special. Get ready to learn some interesting science about materials you use every day; we will then go into the lab and check out some not-so-everyday materials.

    This 1-hour presentation is designed for children ages 7 and up and their families, but all are welcome to join and learn something new! Visit our website for registration and some...

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