Events

    2021 May 03

    Harvard Library Presents: Archival Stories of Indigenous and Asian Experiences at Harvard

    3:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard-Yenching Library & University Archives—Online

    Join us for a discussion on stories of navigating Harvard. Experts from the Harvard-Yenching Library and University Archives will share materials from Harvard's archival and library collections focused on Indigenous and Asian experiences throughout Harvard's past. The program will feature brief remarks from Martha Whitehead, Vice President for the Harvard Library and University...

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    2021 May 03

    Imagining Urban Futures / During, Despite, and Beyond the Pandemic

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Center for African Studies—Online

    The event, moderated by Bruno Carvalho and Diane Davis, will bring together perspectives from different regions of the globe. AbdouMaliq Simone, Eric Klinenberg, and Hiba Bou Akar will present their views of the connections between the ongoing pandemic and urbanization. They will respond to questions from the moderators as well as attendees. Audience members will have a chance to present questions to the speakers during the event, and in advance at registration.

    ...

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    2021 Apr 20

    Racial Inequity and Housing Instability in Boston: Past, Present, and Future

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Millions of Americans have long struggled to pay for housing, with communities of color additionally burdened by housing discrimination and historical race-based policies, such as legalized segregation, redlining, and mortgage discrimination. In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent economic crisis, the federal government instituted a moratorium on evictions that is currently set to expire on March 31, 2021. Despite this, the continuing public health emergency has exacerbated the national housing affordability crisis for people of color, who are more likely to have lost...

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    2021 Apr 16

    Resetting the Table: A Virtual Talk and Tour with the Curators

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    The "Resetting the Table: Food and Our Changing Tastes" exhibition at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology explores food choices and eating habits in the United States, including the sometimes hidden but always important ways in which our tables are shaped by cultural, historical, political, and technological influences.

    Join us on this special virtual talk and tour at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology with Joyce Chapli, guest curator and Harvard University James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History; Janis Sacco, Director...

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    2021 Apr 07

    Recovering the Histories of Seven Enslaved Americans

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    For seven seasons, award-winning Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. has uncovered the ancestral stories of celebrity guests on his hit-television series, Finding Your Roots. In this program, Gates will be joined by Dr. Gregg Hecimovich to discuss the process of unearthing the histories of formerly enslaved people. The focus will be on  Alfred, Delia, Drana, Fassena, Jack, Jim, and Renty, seven Black men and women who were photographed against their will in Columbia, South Carolina in 1850. These controversial photographs are the subject of a new book, To Make Their Own...

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    2021 Apr 07

    Sports As A Classroom: Lessons in Leadership, Diversity, Inclusion & Impact from Women in Sports

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    Join us for a virtual panel discussion with some of Harvard’s sports leaders as they share lessons about the importance of diversity, the impact of inclusion, and their journey to successful leaders.

    Panelists:

    • Tari Cash, Founder & CEO at City Swing Golf, Harvard Business School, MBA 2005
    • Allison Feaster, Vice President Player Development & Organizational Growth, Boston Celtics, Harvard University, BA 1998
    • Traci Green, The Sheila Kelly Palandjian Head Coach for Harvard Women’s Tennis
    • Ngozi...
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    2021 Apr 01

    Race, Representation, and Agassiz’s Brazilian Fantasy

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    How do we confront the history and legacy of Louis Agassiz’s extensive archive of images of African and Indigenous Brazilians made in Manaus, Brazil in 1865 and housed at Harvard’s Peabody Museum?

    Four distinguished panelists reflect on the historical moment when these pictures were taken, discuss racist displays of Indigenous people in Brazil and elsewhere, and, by bringing to light respect for different epistemologies, explore ways to contend with them today. Panelists will be writer and historian Christoph Irmscher (contributor to the recent Peabody Museum Press book about...

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    2021 Mar 29

    Marc Angélil and Charlotte Malterre-Barthes, "Migrant Marseille: Architectures of Social Segregation and Urban Inclusivity"

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    On November 5, 2018, a pair of dilapidated buildings in central Marseille collapsed, taking the lives of eight people, many of them from immigrant origin. This toll of urban decay reflects both the diversity of the district and the hardship of living in Marseille, a city marked for centuries by migration, poverty, and social inequality. Divided along ethnic and class lines, with wealthy conservatives dominating the south and an energetic but pauperized community of immigrant origins in the north, Marseille highlights the tensions stemming from discriminatory governance, lack of housing-...

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    2021 Mar 25

    Ana María León and Torsten Lange, "Bodies of Work: Activism, Gender, Architecture"

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In this conversation, architectural historians Ana María León and Torsten Lange consider the labor of organizing around issues of gender in architecture. Based on three precedents, they will reflect on their work and practice and highlight how the present has allowed scholars and practitioners to revise architectural historiography. Building on intersectional feminist theory, the discussion considers architecture and urban space as well as architectural discourse as forums where white heteronormative systems of planning can become subverted by empowered labor and living practices....

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    2021 Mar 11

    Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem (Film Screening and Panel Discussion)

    3:30pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Join the Harvard Law School Library for a live screening and panel discussion of “Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem,” a new documentary about the racial history and modern discrimination of the American misdemeanor system. The film, produced by Brave New Films and directed by Robert Greenwald, was inspired by HLS Professor Alexandra Natapoff’s book, “Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal.”

    ...

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    2021 Mar 08

    The Future of Diplomacy is Female: A Conversation with Secretary Madeleine Albright

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    The U.S. and the world are at an inflection point, where resilient leadership and strategic reimagining of alliances, competition, and power are needed to rebuild at home and abroad. Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, with her steady voice of reason and analysis, consistently warning of the dangers of fascism and championing the ideals of democracy, is a source of inspiration to women and girls around the world.

    Drawing on her decades of experience, Secretary Albright will discuss the leadership qualities needed to face new diplomatic challenges of the 21st century...

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    2021 Mar 08

    Lessons Learned from Anti-Equality Mobilization

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    The 21st century Central European illiberal transformation is a process deeply reliant on gender politics. A feminist analysis is central to understanding the current regime changes, both in terms of their ideological underpinnings, and with respect to their modus operandi. Key aspects of this phenomenon are: 1. opposition to the liberal equality paradigm has become a key ideological space where the illiberal alternative to the post-1989 (neo)liberal project is being forged; 2. family mainstreaming and anti-gender policies have been one of the main pillars on which the illiberal state...

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    2021 Mar 08

    A Celebration of International Women’s Day with Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan

    10:00am to 11:00am

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    In celebration of International Women’s Day 2021, Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan joins the Center for International Development, Belfer Center’s Middle East Initiative, Women and Public Policy Program, and the Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School to discuss women’s empowerment, cross-cultural dialogue, and innovative solutions to global challenges. The conversation will be moderated by Melani Cammett, Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs at Harvard.

    ...

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    2021 Mar 05

    Think like a Historian, Imagine Like a Designer: A Conversation on Landscape History and Design Education

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    History is a manner of thinking about the world, grounded in the places we design, construct, and inhabit. Design offers the opportunity to re-imagine the world around us, today and for the future. We might draw from history, or draw upon it; certainly, it is to be hoped that we are drawn to it, as designers and historians. The purpose of landscape history—not reducible to memory nor timelines nor styles—is to produce and share knowledge of how we have come to be who and where we are. We will gather across studios we collectively inhabit to draw attention to and lessons from the...

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    2021 Feb 24

    The History of Structural Racism in Charlottesville: Legally-Enforced Segregation and Its Impact on Health

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    Using Charlottesville as a case study, Dayna Bowen Matthew, JD, PhD, Dean and Harold H. Greene Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School, explores the theory, mechanisms, and impact on health of legally-mandated residential segregation and how we can identify and redress historical inequities.

    ...

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    2021 Feb 17

    The Politics of Health Policy: Integrating Racial Justice into Health Care and Clinical Research

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    What are political determinants of health? How have they driven inequities in the U.S. health care system? Daniel Dawes, JD, director of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute Morehouse School of Medicine, shares an inclusive approach to addressing health issues impacting the most vulnerable populations in an increasingly complex...

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    2021 Feb 11

    Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation

    4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History—Online

    Join a post-election conversation with Latosha Brown, Black Voters Matter) and Warren Center American Democracy Fellow. 

    Moderated by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy, HKS; Suzanne Young Murray Professor, Radcliffe.

    Learn more and RSVP for Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation.

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    2021 Feb 10

    Enduring Unethical Lessons from the Past: Learning from the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    The United States Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee is used as a case study of the exploitation of communities of color at the hands of medical professionals. What are the lessons learned and how far has medical ethics really come in terms of the treatment of Black and other communities of color? Lillie Head, president of Voices for Our Fathers Legacy Foundation, and Riggins R. Earl, Jr...

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    2021 Feb 02

    Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard—Online

    Book Panel on Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic by Álvaro Santana-Acuña

    Gabriel García Márquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude seemed destined for obscurity upon its publication in 1967. The little-known author, small publisher, magical style, and setting in a remote Caribbean village were hardly the usual ingredients for success in the literary marketplace. Yet today it ranks among the best-selling books of all time. Translated into dozens of languages, it continues to enter the lives...

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    2021 Feb 01

    Human Rights and the Future World Order

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    The issue of human rights presents a special challenge for any effort to construct a workable world order. Can democracies and their publics remain true to their stated values within a world where human rights abuses are still widespread, without meddling into other nations' domestic political affairs or presuming to know exactly how to achieve these ends globally? To what extent will differences over basic notions of human rights undermine efforts to cooperate on trade, climate, arms control, or other pressing global problems?

    ...

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