Events

    Prosociality in Hybrid Societies of Humans, Agents, and Robots

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Ana Paiva is a computer science professor at Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, and is investigating the design of intelligent interactive systems by creating “social agents'' that can interact with humans in a natural manner. Over the years, she has developed this field by engineering social agents that exhibit specific capabilities, including emotions, personality, culture, nonverbal behavior, empathy, and collaboration, among others.

    Join Paiva to learn about her current investigation into the conditions and mechanisms that drive societies of agents and...

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    Flap, Hop, Caw

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Celebrate International Crow and Raven Appreciation Day by taking a virtual swoop through the Peabody Museum. These smart birds play games with each other, display anger and friendliness, and appear in cultural tales from around the world. Flap like a real raven with museum educator Javier Marin and learn more about the birds’ characteristics. Find ravens drawn or carved in Alaskan Native art, enjoy a read-aloud Tlingit tale and make a paper craft with Andy Majewski.

    Ages: 5–7 (with an adult, if needed)

    Cost: $3 members; $5...

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    Bark: Get to Know Your Trees

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    Due to popular demand, we are offering another session of this free webinar. Led by naturalist and conservationist, Michael Wojtech, you'll learn to identify tree species by their bark and discover why such a variety of bark characteristics exist. Why do some species have smooth bark, while on others it is thick and broken? Why does bark peel? Join us to find out!

    Learn more about and RSVP for "Bark: Get...

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    The Work of Objects: Interpretation within and beyond Museum Walls—Art Museums and the Legacies of the Dutch Slave Trade: Curating Histories, Envisioning Futures (Part 4)

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    This session includes brief talks, followed by a roundtable discussion, by academics and museum professionals who focus on Dutch and American art and history. Speakers will discuss specific objects—ranging from the 17th to the 21st century—that have posed interpretive and museological challenges. They will also present new possibilities for considering the relationship between slavery’s past and present-day racial injustice.

    This is the fourth and final session of Art Museums and the Legacies of the Dutch Slave Trade: Curating Histories, Envisioning Futures, presented...

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    Gutman Library Book Talk: The Education Trap: Schools and the Remaking of Inequality in Boston

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    For generations, Americans have looked to education as the solution to economic disadvantage. Yet, although more people are earning degrees, the gap between rich and poor is widening. Cristina Groeger delves into the history of this seeming contradiction, explaining how education came to be seen as a panacea even as it paved the way for deepening inequality.

    Learn more about and...

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    History, Memory, and Legacy: Jamaica Kincaid, Rosana Paulino, and Cheryl Finley in Conversation—Art Museums and the Legacies of the Dutch Slave Trade: Curating Histories, Envisioning Futures (Part 3)

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Renowned writer Jamaica Kincaid and groundbreaking visual artist Rosana Paulino will discuss their explorations of the legacies of slavery in their work. They will be joined in conversation by eminent art historian Cheryl Finley.

    This is the third session of Art Museums and the Legacies of the Dutch Slave Trade: Curating Histories, Envisioning Futures, presented by the Center for Netherlandish Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Harvard Art Museums, and...

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    The Dawn of Olmec Civilization

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    The hearth of Olmec civilization is located in the tropical lowlands of Mexico’s southern Gulf Coast region, in the majestic archaeological site of San Lorenzo. The inhabitants of this first Olmec capital developed a distinctive geo-political territory and managed complex trade systems. The Olmec also created spectacular earthen architecture and magnificent stone sculpture—including the famous Colossal Heads—that reflect their stratified social organization and centralized political system backed by religion and directed by hereditary rulers.

    Building on the pioneering work of...

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    If You Want Your Startup to Succeed, You Need to Understand Why Startups Fail!

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    HBS Professor Tom Eisenmann will discuss insights from his book, Why Startups Fail, with two failed alumni founders: Christina Wallace (HBS MBA ’10), co-founder of Quincy Apparel and now Senior Lecturer at HBS, and Lindsay Hyde (Harvard College ’04; HBS MBA ’14), co-founder of Baroo, now Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Moderne Ventures, and soon to join HBS as a lecturer co-teaching the MBA elective “Entrepreneurial Failure” with Eisenmann.

    Eisenmann’s book describes six patterns that account for most startup failures and offers guidance on how to anticipate and avoid them. The...

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    Cecilia Puga

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Cecilia Puga is the Director and founding partner of CECILIA PUGA – PAULA VELASCO ARQUITECTURA. Since 1995 she has developed her professional practice independently in Santiago, where she has carried out design projects at different scales and programs, from single-family homes (most notably the House in Bahia Azul), to collective housing, educational and industrial equipment, and urban design such as the renovation of public spaces in Cerro Toro. She has developed her academic activity at Universidad Católica de Santiago, at ETH Zurich’s School of Architecture, Austin’s University of...

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    After-School Animal Encounters: Humans and Animals

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Life on planet Earth can sometimes seem unbelievably diverse and resilient, yet we’re more aware than ever of how connected all living beings are to one another. This special Earth Week edition focuses on some of the challenges animals face today, and on what we humans—young and old—can do to help. This event will be fun for the whole family so bring your questions and sense of wonder, and join Javier, Ryan, and some of our amazing animals as they lead you in a live 45-minute program.

    ...

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    Art Talk Live: Up Close and Personal—Looking at Ancient Textiles

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Egyptian makers were skilled at using only a few materials to create a rich variety of textiles, but we rarely have detailed information about the people who made them or their artistic processes.

    Join conservation fellow Julie Wertz to explore what close looking, microscopy, and micro-analytical techniques can teach us about the materials and methods these unknown makers used to create beautiful and functional art objects.

    ...

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    Harvard Dance Center Spring '21 Artist Talk

    Location: 

    Harvard Dance Center—Online

    In conversation with: Harvard Dance Center returning visiting artists Peter Chu, Chanel DaSilva, and Shamel Pitts.

    Choreographers and dancers are problem-solvers. They move through crises rather than around them. Join us this spring for community gatherings with Harvard Dance Center’s exceptional teaching artists in a series of artist-led dialogues that explore how artistry, identity, and advocacy take shape in turbulent times.

    ...

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    Resetting the Table: A Virtual Talk and Tour with the Curators

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    The "Resetting the Table: Food and Our Changing Tastes" exhibition at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology explores food choices and eating habits in the United States, including the sometimes hidden but always important ways in which our tables are shaped by cultural, historical, political, and technological influences.

    Join us on this special virtual talk and tour at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology with Joyce Chapli, guest curator and Harvard University James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History; Janis Sacco, Director...

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    De-centering/Re-centering: Forging New Museological and Historical Narratives—Art Museums and the Legacies of the Dutch Slave Trade: Curating Histories, Envisioning Futures (Part 2)

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

     

    This session brings together historians and art historians whose work has, on the one hand, been grounded in art museum collections and, on the other, challenged traditional museological narratives of slavery’s legacies in the Netherlands and the Americas.

    This is the second session of Art Museums and the Legacies of the Dutch Slave Trade: Curating Histories, Envisioning Futures, presented by the Center for Netherlandish Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Harvard Art...

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    Art Study Center Seminar at Home: From Portable Studio to Digital Archive—A Look at Otto Piene’s Sketchbooks

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Since we are unable to welcome you into the museums at this time, we are bringing our experts to you in the online series Art Study Center Seminars at Home.

    Otto Piene (1928–2014) was a pioneer in multimedia and technology-based art, creating a large, kaleidoscopic body of work based on the intersections of art, science, and nature. In this session, curatorial fellow Lauren Hanson and museum data specialist Jeff Steward share their research into the 2019 gift of Piene’s sketchbooks—a visual archive of over seven decades of artistic practice—and how the bound pages of these “...

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    Remote Work Revolution, Succeeding from Anywhere

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    In the last year, people have had a glimpse into the opportunities that remote work can afford them, such as nonexistent commute times, flex time, and increased productivity. Many organizations are planning to permanently incorporate remote days into their long-term routines, or give their employees the option to work from home full-time. On the other, remote work has brought to light many challenges that are inherent with virtual arrangements: work like boundaries can blur and people can feel isolated, out of sync and out of touch.

    Professor Neeley and Dean Khurana will...

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    The Sound of One Hand Knocking: Kano Sansetsu’s Solitary Encounters

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    If hearts are in harmony, do we have to travel for a meeting of minds to take place? Matthew McKelway retraces the paths of two such “meetings,” legendary for never having taking place, but depicted, nevertheless, by Kano Sansetsu (1590–1651) on a pair of folding screens. Thanks to McKelway’s research, the screens are now titled A Visit to Li Ning’s Secluded Dwelling and Wang Ziyou Visiting Dai Andao.

    ...

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    Body Builders: How Animals Regenerate New Parts

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Regeneration is a remarkable phenomenon in which an animal can regrow parts of its body that are lost or damaged by injury. Humans, for example, can repair some organs, but some animals can rebuild their entire bodies from small pieces of tissue. How do these animals accomplish this feat? And why is it that humans cannot regenerate as well as these animals can? Studies of how regeneration works at the molecular and cellular level are beginning to answer the first question. To answer the second question, we have to understand how regeneration has evolved.

    Mansi Srivastava will...

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    Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Thea Riofrancos’s current project, “Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition,” explores the politics of the transition to renewable energy through the lens of one of its key technologies: lithium batteries. Based on multisited fieldwork following lithium’s global supply chains from the point of extraction in the Chilean desert, “Brine to Batteries” will be the first scholarly account of the rapidly moving processes shaping the contours of the next energy system—and those of our planetary future.

    ...

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    H ARQUITECTES, “Where the Invisible Becomes Visible”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    We are convinced that interactions with natural phenomena, in addition to optimizing resources, deeply link architecture to its surroundings.

    These interactions give a real and intense meaning to the spaces, awakening the most emotional dimension of architecture, transforming inert matter into something alive. Every time architecture makes these natural phenomena evident and “the invisible” appears, the link with the natural environment is established again, providing life to the building and turning the experience into something transcendent, sensitive and deeply connected to...

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