Events

    Harvard/Yale Battle of the Big Bands

    Location: 

    Scullers Jazz Club, 400 Soldiers Field Rd., Boston

    Join Scullers Jazz Club for the Third Annual "Battle of the Big Bands" with the Harvard and Yale Jazz Orchestras with Special Guests, Saxophonists Wayne Escoffery and Yosvani Terry!

    Harvard's Jazz Band has performed worldwide, including 2017 performances in Cuba, and past concerts have included tributes to Herbie Hancock, Benny Golson, and many other important jazz artists. Performers in these concerts have included Terri Lyne Carrington, Lionel Loueke, Harold Mabern, George Coleman, Don Braden, and more.

    The Yale Jazz Ensemble, a seventeen-piece big band...

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    Film Screening: Dovlatov

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    Dovlatov follows a few days in the life of famed Soviet writer, Sergei Dovlatov, on the eve of his friend's, future Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky, emigration in 1971. Sergei is determined to stay and lead a normal life with his wife Elena and daughter Katya, however, his manuscripts are regularly rejected by the official media as his point of view is deemed undesirable.

    Dovlatov premiered at the 2018 Berlin International Film Festival, where it was awarded a Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution for costume and production design. Directed by...

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    Saving America’s Cities: The Past, Present, and Future of Urban Revitalization

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Can past efforts to revitalize America’s cities inform contemporary strategies to address the problems of economic inequality, unaffordable housing, segregated neighborhoods, and deteriorating infrastructure?

    That question, in part, informs Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age, a new book by Lizabeth Cohen, Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University and former Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

    Cohen will discuss this history and will be joined in...

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    The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the tenth and eleventh centuries. The causes continue to be investigated and debated. Paleoenvironmental research over the past twenty years has revealed that the demise coincided with a prolonged, intensive drought that extended across the region, providing compelling evidence that climate change played a key role in the collapse of the Maya. Billie Turner will examine this evidence and the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

    ...

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    The New Geopolitical Order

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The new geopolitical environment taking shape in many parts of the world tends toward increasing authoritarianism and nationalistic competition. In this lecture, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, an international human rights advocate and the former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, will argue that the world’s people deserve better. Despite the demagoguery and isolationism that some leaders are pursuing, he believes it is possible to pursue thoughtful diplomacy and a system of connectivity, coalitions, and partnerships to reform institutions and change polices.

    ...

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    Parker Quartet: Spectrum

    Location: 

    Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Ave., Allston

    The Grammy Award-winning Parker Quartet returns to the Harvard Ed Portal February 26 as part of their 2019-2020 season. Join us for an evening of classical music that explores 300 years of the string quartet genre, and its history of inspiring great composers to create their most personal and dynamic works. Covering a wide spectrum of artistic thought and expression, from humor and mysticism to a holy song of thanksgiving, the program will highlight select works from this exciting and unique medium. All are welcome!

    ...

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    Conducting Oneself: Choreographing Bodies and Identities On and Off the Podium

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    At Radcliffe, Daniel M. Callahan is beginning his second book, “Conducting Oneself,” which examines how the bodies, identities, and repertoire of orchestra conductors produce, legitimate, and limit their movements on the podium and off, from conservatories to coveted positions. Drawing on movement analysis, oral history, and affect theory, the project explores how conductors visibly embody their empathy with scores while simultaneously projecting expertise and power.

    ...

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    Harvard Film Archive: Weekend Matinee

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The HFA continues its specially priced screenings of films for children and accompanying adults, plus a special selection for teenagers. Drawing from the Harvard Film Archive collection and beyond, this series of classic and contemporary films are screened in their original formats and languages.

    All Weekend Matinee screenings are admission-free for holders of a valid Cambridge Public Library card!

    Schedule
    December 15: Three Wishes for Cinderella
    January 25: Tito and the Birds
    February 8: Whisper of the Heart
    ...

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    Film: Destruction Babies with Director in Person

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Wildly popular in Japan, Tetsuya Mariko’s breakthrough feature tells the story of a young man drawn mysteriously into a spiral of unrelenting violence. A purposefully problematic film, Destruction Babies seems at one level to embrace the unreal ultra-violence of manga, video games and commercial cinema while also bending it into a kind of parodic self-criticism.

    Cost: $12 special event tickets.

    ...

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    Exhibition Reception: PARTLY CLOUDY

    Location: 

    Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Ave., Allston

    Join the Harvard Ed Portal for an exhibition reception for PARTLY CLOUDY.

    Chris Sageman’s artwork revolves around the overwhelming and the confusing. In assembling segments of text, images, and abstract graphics, Sageman creates large-scale paintings that reflect the volume of visual information we consume on a daily basis. In PARTLY CLOUDY, Sageman presents a series of paintings that diagram our current moment. By isolating fractions of imagery in each diagram, the paintings serve as disjointed road maps that try to make sense of all the bits and pieces and...

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    History Reconsidered: Poetry Reading and Discussion

    Location: 

    Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    Join the Radcliffe Institute for a poetry reading and discussion with Clint Smith.

    Clint Smith is a doctoral candidate at Harvard University and an Emerson Fellow at New America. He has received fellowships from the Art For Justice Fund, Cave Canem, and the National Science Foundation, while his writing has been published in the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, Poetry Magazine, the Paris Review, and elsewhere. His first full-length collection of poetry, Counting Descent, was published in 2016. It won the 2017...

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    Film: Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project with Director in Person

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Matt Wolf’s engaging documentary tells two stories: one, the life story of a remarkably prescient and stubbornly individualistic radical librarian who refused to fit neatly into the role of wife or mother, and a second that traces the emergence and arguably disastrous effects of the twenty-four-hour American news cycle that she secretly recorded in her Philadelphia home from 1979-2012.

    Cost: $12 special event tickets.

    ...

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    Exhibition: Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Painting Edo—one of the largest exhibitions ever presented at the Harvard Art Museums—offers a window onto the supremely rich visual culture of Japan’s early modern era. Selected from the unparalleled collection of Robert S. and Betsy G. Feinberg, the more than 120 works in the exhibition connect visitors with a seminal moment in the history of Japan, as the country settled into an era of peace under the warrior government of the shoguns and opened its doors to greater engagement with the outside world. The dizzying array of artistic lineages and studios active during the Edo...

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    Opening Lecture: Painting Edo

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    As part of the Harvard Art Museums' opening celebration for Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection, SOAS University of London art history professor Timon Screech will present "Into the Kaleidoscope: Painting in Edo Japan."

    Tickets are required for the lecture and may be acquired in person, by phone, or online for a small fee through the Harvard Box Office. Limit of two tickets per person.

    ...

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    Ancient Egyptian Culture and Its Continuity in Modern Egypt

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Egypt’s recorded history spans six thousand years and is therefore one of the longest and best known in the world. Today, Egyptians practice several religious, artistic, and social traditions that can be traced to ancient Egypt, demonstrating the power and longevity of cultural memory. Drawing on research in archaeology, Egyptian art, writing, and culture, Fayza Haikal will examine Egyptian society’s cultural expressions from antiquity to the present, focusing on language, spirituality, superstitions, funerary traditions, and folklore.

    ...

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