Events

    Forest Bathing with Toadstool Walks

    Location: 

    Bussey Street Gate, Arnold Arboretum, Boston

    Join Tam Willey of Toadstool Walks as you slow down and awaken your senses on a guided therapeutic experience in the Arnold Arboretum. Forest bathing is inspired by the Japanese practice of Shinrin-yoku, a restorative sensory exploration that supports health and healing for all beings. Each walk is limited to 8 participants. Meet at the Bussey Street Gate. Participants must follow COVID guidelines including wearing a mask and practicing social distancing, as well as sign a liability and release form.

    Learn more about and RSVP for Forest Bathing with Toadstool Walks:
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    ¡A Bailar! Zumba con Abe—Let's Dance! Zumba with Abe

    Location: 

    Harvard Ed Portal—Online

    Si te intimida el gimnasio porque no sabes por donde empezar, pero la música Latina te pone a bailar, entonces prepárate para una fiesta inolvidable desde tu propia casa! Ven a reír y moverte al ritmo de Zumba con Abe, una clase energética, donde lo más importante es estar presente y olvidarse de lo demás!

    Con más de 6 años de experiencia enseñando Zumba a personas de todas edades, Abe modifica cada clase para que todos puedan participar! No hay que ser bailarín profesional. Solo únete a la clase, sube el volumen, y deja que la música te mueva! Te esperamos!! La clase se da en...

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    A Perpetual Crisis: Reflections on Renewed Public Health Failures at the U.S./Mexico Border

    Location: 

    The Harvard Global Health Institute & FXB Center for Health and Human Rights—Online

    In March 2021, a record number of children arrived at the U.S./Mexico border, challenging capacity at US Customs and Border Protection facilities and placing newfound pressure on the Biden Administration to act promptly. However, this humanitarian crisis is not new, nor is it a direct result of a new U.S. government administration. For decades, the U.S. has failed to improve a system ill-equipped to handle the needs of vulnerable refugees and migrants. As children wait in overcrowded jail-like structures and COVID-19 remains a threat, concerns about who will continue to suffer at the...

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    Vaccine Equity and Efficacy in the United States and the World

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    As efforts to distribute COVID-19 vaccines intensify throughout the United States and across the globe, how can we ensure that equity and access are prioritized? This panel seeks to address the challenges and opportunities of equitable public health strategies around COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

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    Education Now: Cultivating the Power of Resilience

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    As we emerge from the COVID-10 pandemic, many experts believe that the aftereffects of isolation, stress, fear, and sadness will linger. Trauma from mental health challenges of the past year will not quickly fade. Today, 18–25-year olds are suffering especially severely from the loneliness epidemic. While this loneliness epidemic preceded the onset of COVID-19, pandemic times have further heightened the isolation and mental and emotional duress experienced by many. Furthermore, a parallel and related epidemic of stress and anxiety in women and girls—from elementary school through college...

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    Guided Tree Meditation

    Location: 

    Outside at the Arnold Arboretum

    This guided tree meditation offers an opportunity to connect and ground the self with the environment around.

    Surrounded by the beauty and life of the Arnold Arboretum, this meditation will be benefitted by the ancient awareness and alchemy of trees and the subtle healing capacities of nature. Join us if you’re ready to root yourself into the energy of spring! 

    Attendance is limited to 10 people so please only register if you can attend. 

    This event will be held outside at the Arnold Arboretum, socially distanced with masks required. ...

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    Racial Inequity and Housing Instability in Boston: Past, Present, and Future

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Millions of Americans have long struggled to pay for housing, with communities of color additionally burdened by housing discrimination and historical race-based policies, such as legalized segregation, redlining, and mortgage discrimination. In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent economic crisis, the federal government instituted a moratorium on evictions that is currently set to expire on March 31, 2021. Despite this, the continuing public health emergency has exacerbated the national housing affordability crisis for people of color, who are more likely to have lost...

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    A Week-Long Celebration of Earth Day

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Join the Harvard Museum of Natural History in celebrating Earth Day with engaging sustainability-themed virtual events and activities for all ages. Join the conversation as Harvard students and experts weigh in on our most pressing environmental challenges, on cutting-edge research, and on promising paths to a more sustainable future. Introduce young minds to environmental science with our live museum animals and HMSC Story Time. Find out how to reconnect with nature and record the biodiversity in your local area. Or, simply indulge in our staff recommendations for...

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    Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Thea Riofrancos’s current project, “Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition,” explores the politics of the transition to renewable energy through the lens of one of its key technologies: lithium batteries. Based on multisited fieldwork following lithium’s global supply chains from the point of extraction in the Chilean desert, “Brine to Batteries” will be the first scholarly account of the rapidly moving processes shaping the contours of the next energy system—and those of our planetary future.

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    Small Business & Our Neighborhoods: Reflections on Community, Resilience, & Innovation

    Location: 

    Online via Zoom

    Running a business under the most ideal conditions is difficult and 2020 brought on a host of previously unthinkable challenges for business owners, their employees, and the communities that support them. While the coronavirus pandemic has tested the entire business community, restaurants, shops, and companies in Allston-Brighton and Cambridge have offered countless examples of how creativity, resilience, and coordination are helping to preserve the vibrant mosaic of businesses that characterize both communities.

    Featuring leaders of small businesses and nonprofits, this panel...

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    Food Literacy Project Speaker Series: Cool Food with Gerard Pozzi

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    Make a difference by eating plant-rich food. Did you know Harvard recently signed the Cool Food Pledge? Learn more about the Cool Food Pledge with speaker, Gerard Pozzi, as he breaks down the impacts of a plant-based diet.

    A quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions come from food production. By simply changing what we eat, we can make a difference to our climate. Cool Food (coolfood.org) helps people and organizations reduce the climate impact of their food through shifting towards more plant-rich diets. Climate action has never been so delicious.

    Cool Food is an...

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    AI and the Future of Health

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) can enhance scientists’ ability to make discoveries. Across the life sciences, AI algorithms are being developed and deployed to speed our path to better health. This special Radcliffe science event will focus on how AI can accelerate research and development in general and drug discovery in particular. The health AI experts Regina Barzilay and Casandra Mangroo will each speak about their innovative work and then join Radcliffe’s Alyssa Goodman in a conversation on AI’s promise—and potential pitfalls—as we look toward the future of human health.

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    Health Care Leadership During COVID-19

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    The COVID-19 pandemic has upended health care delivery and economics. This webinar will provide the behind-the-scenes perspective of a senior hospital leader in a time of crisis. Dr. Kimball will discuss how she and her leadership team adapted to the immediate crisis as well as its prolonged evolution, from establishing a command structure to discovering hidden talents on their team. The session will explore leadership lessons and her insights for the path forward.

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    COVID-19 and the Law: The Health Care System in the Age of COVID-19

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    This seminar series will consider the ethical, legal, regulatory, and broader social and institutional impacts that COVID-19 has had, as well as the longer-lasting effects it may have on our society. This fifth seminar in the series will focus on how the health care system has reacted and evolved during the pandemic.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost all aspects of life in the United States and around the world, disrupting the global economy as well as countless institutions. The issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic present a critical juncture for the U.S. and other...

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    RISE: Get Up and Get Moving (for Allston-Brighton & Cambridge High Schoolers)

    Location: 

    Harvard Ed Portal—Online

    *For high school students living or attending school in Allston-Brighton or Cambridge*

    Zoom fatigue is REAL, and we don't know about you, but all this sitting and laying down has got us feeling down... so let's get up! Join us for six weeks of movement, stress relief, and relaxation that you can do wherever you are, whenever you want—especially when you're feeling cooped up inside or stressed about anything.

    We'll do some stretches, cardio, and other fun exercises you can do at home, anytime. You can even do them while watching your...

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    Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, "The Miasmist: George E. Waring, Jr. and Landscapes of Public Health"

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In 1867, nineteenth-century sanitary engineer George E. Waring, Jr. (1833–1898) published an influential manual entitled “Draining for Profit, Draining for Health,” reflecting the obsessions of his gilded age—wealth, health, and miasma. Even as the germ theory emerged, Waring supported the anti-contagionist miasma theory, positing that disease spread through the air as a poisonous vapor, emerging from damp soil. He applied his knowledge of farm drainage to an urban theory of public health, with a drainage plan for Central Park; a sewerage system for Memphis; a transformation of New York...

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    Discover the Joy of Eating with Dietitian, Michelle Gallant

    Location: 

    Harvard Food Literacy Project—Online

    Eating can feel like either a chore or a bore these days. There are so many conflicting diet messages, mixed up with fancy cooking shows, and constant food marketing. Wouldn't it be great to just relax and enjoy food instead of constantly struggling with it? You can learn to trust yourself around food and feel good about your eating. Join HUHS nutritionist Michelle Gallant for a discussion on a kinder, gentler approach to food. Please have a snack ready for a brief guided mindful eating exercise.

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    Challenges to Social Welfare Provision During and After COVID-19

    Location: 

    David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard—Online

    Many Latin American governments reduced inequality and strengthened social safety nets since the 2000s. Will COVID-19 wipe out Latin America’s progress? How has the pandemic exposed and affected inequalities in the region? To what extent have governments been able to use social policy to cushion the blow? And what reforms to social welfare models will be needed in coming years? Three experts on Latin American welfare systems will take stock of the variation in impacts and responses to COVID-19 and the path ahead to strengthen social welfare systems.

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    One Year Later: COVID-19 and the Road Ahead

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    On the eve of the first anniversary of the COVID-19 shutdown, the Institute of Politics gathers the experts from our final in-person Forum event last March to reflect on the past year. Our guests analyze the government and public health response, vaccine development and distribution, and what the future holds with a mutating virus and worldwide variants. How well did the government do with public messaging? Did the public heed the warnings and do their part to stop the spread of the virus?

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    The History of Structural Racism in Charlottesville: Legally-Enforced Segregation and Its Impact on Health

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    Using Charlottesville as a case study, Dayna Bowen Matthew, JD, PhD, Dean and Harold H. Greene Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School, explores the theory, mechanisms, and impact on health of legally-mandated residential segregation and how we can identify and redress historical inequities.

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