Events

    Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic

    Location: 

    Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard—Online

    Book Panel on Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic by Álvaro Santana-Acuña

    Gabriel García Márquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude seemed destined for obscurity upon its publication in 1967. The little-known author, small publisher, magical style, and setting in a remote Caribbean village were hardly the usual ingredients for success in the literary marketplace. Yet today it ranks among the best-selling books of all time. Translated into dozens of languages, it continues to enter the lives...

    Read more about Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic

    Antique Inspirations, Fresh Creations

    Location: 

    Online Event

    James S. Snyder, HKS/MEI Senior Fellow, in conversation with award-winning Palestinian-Israeli architect Senan Abdelqader on the influences of Arab culture across time on art, architecture, and design in Israel, Palestine, and the world today. This event is part of the fall 2020 MEI series, James Snyder in Conversation: A series of dialogues on art, culture, politics, and the possibilities for transcending conflict through cultural connection in the modern Middle East.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

    ...

    Read more about Antique Inspirations, Fresh Creations

    2020 Visions

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Too often, the story of women’s suffrage unfolds in a vacuum, seemingly unconnected from the general contours of American history. This panel discussion looks back from the present, asking experts working in a variety of disciplines and organizations to briefly unfold, TED-talk style, a single “big idea” that captures the significance of the 19th Amendment for voting rights, citizenship, and democracy today.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

    ...

    Read more about 2020 Visions

    Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    “What college does, it helps us learn about the nation,” said Rodney Spivey-Jones, a 2017 Bard College graduate currently incarcerated at Fishkill Correctional Facility in New York, in the docuseries College behind Bars. “It helps us become civic beings. It helps us understand that we have an interest in our community, that our community is a part of us and we are a part of it.”

    The Bard Prison Initiative and programs at other institutions of higher learning across the country have brought together teachers and learners in incarcerated spaces for years. This panel will gather...

    Read more about Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    The Architecture of Democracy

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In the week before the U.S. general election, Harvard and MIT will share a public discussion on the role of architecture in a representative democracy. Colleagues and students from across both institutions will join in dialogue on the profession’s role in supporting democratic society, now and in the future.

    Panelists participating in this event will be announced in the coming weeks.

    Learn more about and RSVP...

    Read more about The Architecture of Democracy

    New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    By the early 1980s, a new political landscape was taking shape that would fundamentally influence American society and politics in the decades to come. That year, the long-standing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—championed by suffragist Alice Paul and introduced to Congress in 1923—ran aground, owing in significant measure to the activism of women who pioneered a new brand of conservatism.

    This panel will draw together strands and stories that are often kept separate: the ideas and growing influence of conservative women, the political activism of gay communities...

    Read more about New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    Immigration Speaker Series: ‘Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants’

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Michael Jones-Correa is President’s Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Director, Center for the Study of Ethnicity, Race and Immigration (CSERI). He is author of Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants (Russell Sage Foundation). His research centers on the topics of immigrant political incorporation and ethnic and racial relations in the United States, often writing about political behavior in the context of institutional structures.

    Our...

    Read more about Immigration Speaker Series: ‘Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants’

    Emerging Scholars of Color Abroad

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Race in Focus: From Critical Pedagogies to Research Practice and Public Engagement in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies

    Among the first African Americans to join the American Communist Party and an important architect of communist approaches to race, racism, and African American equality, Lovett Fort- Whiteman (1889-1939) was one of the US citizens convinced (naively, to be sure) that Soviet society showed the way for overcoming racism in the United States. While visiting...

    Read more about Emerging Scholars of Color Abroad

    The Enduring Legacy of Slavery and Racism in the North

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Although Massachusetts formally abolished slavery in 1783, the visible and invisible presence of slavery continued in the Commonwealth and throughout New England well into the 19th century. Harvard professor Louis Agassiz’s theory about human origins is but one example of the continued presence and institutionalization of racism in the North.

    Taking as a starting point the new book To Make Their Own Way in the World: The Enduring Legacy of the Zealy Daguerreotypes, this panel of experts will examine the role and impact of slavery in the North and discuss the influence...

    Read more about The Enduring Legacy of Slavery and Racism in the North

    From the Hands of the Makers

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    From 1886 to 1936, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka applied their artistic talents and knowledge of natural history to create an exquisite collection of glass models of plants to support the botanical education of Harvard students and the public. This program will explore the history, conservation, and relevance of the Glass Flowers in the twenty-first century and introduce the publication Glass Flowers: Marvels of Art and Science at Harvard, a compendium of new photographs that captures the beauty and magnificent detail of the models.

    ...

    Read more about From the Hands of the Makers

    On Account of Sex (1920)

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 did not "give" women the vote. Rather, it established a negative: that the right to vote could not be abridged on account of sex alone. This session brings together diverse participants who will each illuminate one facet of women’s political history at this key transitional moment. Together, participants will emphasize the radical achievement of the amendment, exploring the full implications of what it meant to remove sex as a barrier to voting, which resulted in the largest-ever one-time expansion of the electorate and mobilized a...

    Read more about On Account of Sex (1920)

    U.S. Foreign Policy and China

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Join the Ash Center and John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum for a virtual event featuring:

    • Lucy Hornby, a fellow at the Nieman Center for Journalism and former Beijing deputy bureau chief for the Financial Times
    • Yasheng Huang, MIT professor of international management
    • Anthony Saich, Daewoo Professor of International Affairs, HKS, Ash Center Director

    ...

    Read more about U.S. Foreign Policy and China

    What Is the Cost of Lies? A conversation with HBO Chernobyl writer and creator Craig Mazin

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Join Craig Mazin, Screenwriter and Film Director and Serhii Plokhii, Director, Ukrainian Research Institute, and Professor of Ukrainian History at Harvard University for What Is the Cost of Lies? A conversation with HBO Chernobyl writer and creator Craig Mazin. 

    This event will be streamed live on YouTube. Please join us and contribute to the conversation via the chat function.

    ...

    Read more about What Is the Cost of Lies? A conversation with HBO Chernobyl writer and creator Craig Mazin

    Judy Chicago Research Portal Launch

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    This event is to celebrate the launch of a collaborative project, the Judy Chicago Research Portal, and to discuss the role of portals in providing access to feminist art archives.

    The Judy Chicago Portal will be presented, challenges in the technology of portal development will be discussed, and Christina Schlesinger and Judy Chicago will discuss the importance of preserving feminist art archives.

    ...

    Read more about Judy Chicago Research Portal Launch

    Maintaining Heritage Languages in Our Communities

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    How can we retain the strength of our identities when our language is attacked, denied, or just lost through lack of practice and resources? How can we ensure that culturally and linguistically sustainable practices are embedded in our teaching, parenting, and social activities? Join the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology for a free panel discussion, watch short animations, view children's books, and discuss ways to support multicultural communities using these tools.

    ...

    Read more about Maintaining Heritage Languages in Our Communities

    Film Screening: The Right to Memory

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    "The Right to Memory," a documentary about Arseny Roginsky and the work of Memorial in Russia, presents excerpts from lengthy interviews with Arseny Roginsky (1946-2017), who offers his thoughts about Russia and Memorial. Roginsky was one of the co-founders and the long-time director of Memorial, which was set up in Moscow in 1988 to document the egregious crimes of the Stalin era and to push for respect of human rights in the USSR (and later in the Russian Federation). Roginsky discusses how Memorial sought to overcome the obstacles posed by official whitewashing under Putin and...

    Read more about Film Screening: The Right to Memory

    Great Russian Jews: Mikhail Botvinnik

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    This panel explores the life and legacy of the chess genius Mikhail Botvinnik (1911-1995).

    Born in Kuokkala, Grand Duchy of Finland (now Repino, Russian Federation), Botvinnik became Soviet Chess Champion in 1931 and World Chess Champion in 1948. One of the 20th century’s dominant chess players and teachers, Botvinnik trained generations of Soviet chess masters, among them world champions Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov, and Vladimir Kramnik.

    ...

    Read more about Great Russian Jews: Mikhail Botvinnik

    Great Russian Jews: David Oistrakh

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    This panel examines the remarkable achievements of the great violinist David Oistrakh (1908-1974). Born and raised in Odessa, Oistrakh became one of the 20th century’s preeminent musical virtuosi. He collaborated with leading musicians and composers of his time, among them Aram Khachatourian and Dmitri Shostakovich.

    Panelists will include: Oleh Krysa (Ukrainian-American Violinist; University of Rochester) and Harlow Robinson (Northeastern University).
    Moderated by Maxim D. Shrayer (Boston College; Davis Center).

    ...

    Read more about Great Russian Jews: David Oistrakh

    Film Screening & Discussion: Women of the Gulag

    Location: 

    CGIS South, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    The documentary film Women of the Gulag tells the compelling and tragic stories of six women as last survivors of the Gulag. Women of the Gulag features six women in their eighties and nineties as they tell their stories while going about their daily lives in remote villages in the Ural Mountains, in break-away Sukhumi, and in the Moscow suburbs. This film was short-listed for the Academy Award Documentary Short Subject nomination, 2019.

    Following the film, Professor Terry Martin will moderate a conversation with Marianna Yoravskaya, the...

    Read more about Film Screening & Discussion: Women of the Gulag

    Schlesinger 75th Anniversary Celebration

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA

    In this performance and discussion, “The Suffragists” captures the power and passion of American women’s fight for the vote through song. Created by the acclaimed singer-songwriter Shaina Taub, the musical tells the story of the last decade of the struggle through the rivalry between Carrie Chapman Catt and Alice Paul. Taub’s musical gives voice to these women in ways that powerfully resonate in today’s political landscape. The performance will be followed by a multidisciplinary panel discussion.

    ...

    Read more about Schlesinger 75th Anniversary Celebration

Pages