Events

    Gutman Library Book Talk – From Oops to Aha: Portraits of Learning from Mistakes in Kindergarten

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    From Oops to Aha pulls back the curtain on learning from mistakes in four public school Kindergarten classrooms: urban, charter, Montessori, and suburban. All Kindergarten classrooms are not the same; the nuanced way teachers respond to mistakes in the moment is impacted by access to resources and by policies enacted at a broader level.

    Maleka Donaldson will be introduced by Dr. Tina Grotzer, Ed.M.'85, Ed.D. '93, Principal Research Scientist in Education at Harvard Graduate School of Education.

    ...

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    Tricia Rose, 'Trayvon Martin: No Chance Encounter'

    Location: 

    Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard—Online

    Join the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research for a virtual W.E.B. Du Bois Lecture, "Trayvon Martin: No Chance Encounter," with Tricia Rose, Chancellor’s Professor of Africana Studies and the Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, Brown University.

    Learn more about and RSVP for this virtual event.

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    Teaching and Leading with Compassion

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Today's teaching challenges are multifaceted, calling on a range of leadership skills, instructional decisions, and—perhaps most important, empathy and compassion. At a time of continued anxiety, when students and educators alike are feeling the strains of pandemic losses of all kinds, how can we make classrooms spaces of welcome, inclusion, safety, and care? How can we teach, lead, mentor, and coach with compassion?

    Join us as we address some of the immense challenges that teachers are facing during the ongoing pandemic. We'll share insights on how to cultivate compassion and...

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    HLS Library Book Talk: Power to the People

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Self-described populist leaders around the world are dismantling their nation’s constitutions. This has led to a widespread view that populism as such is inconsistent with constitutionalism. We disagree. Some forms of populism are inconsistent with constitutionalism, others aren’t. Context and detail matter.

    Join us for a discussion with co-authors Mark Tushnet (HLS) and Bojan Bugarič (University of Sheffield) and panelists Tom Ginsburg (University of Chicago), Lawrence Lessig (HLS), and Sanford V. Levinson (University of Texas) followed by an audience Q&A session.

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    Gutman Library Book Talk: Class Dismissed

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Set during the “Ed Reform” wars of the 1990s, Class Dismissed offers a fresh lens on the urban teacher tale: an intimate view of teaching and learning, each classroom its own ecosystem, the eye of its own little storm. Seen through the warm and humorous eyes of Patrick Lynch, the crucible of inner-city education, with its stew of race, class and political tensions, provides a portrait of love and loss, a surprising path to self-discovery, and a belated coming-of-age.

    Author and educator Kevin M. McIntosh will be in conversation with Dr. Karla Brooks Baehr, former...

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    The State of Democracy in Latin America

    Location: 

    David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard—Online

    Latin America has been buffeted by economic crisis, soaring crime rates, major corruption scandals, and a devastating pandemic. These crises have threatened democracies across much of the region. DRCLAS has assembled four prominent scholars of Latin American politics to evaluate the state of democracy in the region. How serious are contemporary threats to Latin American democracies? What are the prospects for their survival?

    ...

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    Anti-Racism in Public Health Policies, Practice, and Research

    Location: 

    FXB Center for Health & Human Rights at Harvard University—Online

    On Tuesday, September 21, the FXB Center will host "Anti-Racism in Public Health Policies, Practice, and Research," a virtual symposium. One of the FXB Center’s latest core initiatives focuses on unpacking and addressing structural racism and health in the U.S. and other parts of the globe. The goal of the FXB Center is to deepen the knowledge base and fill gaps in content and methodology, while ensuring that research and evidence is responsive to community needs and informs policymaking.

    The symposium aims to launch this initiative and start a series of conversations and...

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    Engendering Democracy: The Significance of Abortion Legalization in Argentina

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    In December 2020, first trimester abortion was legalized in Argentina with the passage of Law 27.610. This historic move presents an inflection point for Argentine democracy, as well as a case study in how rights concepts can be deployed effectively to advance reproductive justice.

    In this event, key actors in the long struggle for legalization — including representatives from the executive and the legislative branches of government, as well as civil society, together with legal academics and health professionals — will describe the complicated and multi-staged narrative of...

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    Nicaragua’s Collapse into Dictatorship

    Location: 

    David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard—Online

    In the months prior to the 2021 presidential election, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega arrested or barred all his main rivals, establishing a level of autocracy not seen since the 1970s. How did Nicaragua plunge this far into dictatorship? What are the prospects for re-democratization?

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    Martin Luther King & The Struggle for Voting Rights, Making Democracy Work

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    Join us for a special session in which Professor David Moss, author of the acclaimed book “Democracy: A Case Study,” makes history come alive with an audience-driven discussion of Martin Luther King Jr. and the struggle for voting rights. Professor Moss will bring his wildly popular approach to teaching the history of American democracy to a new stage in this public forum hosted by Harvard Business School.

    So please bring your ideas, and leave your preconceptions at the door. It will be an afternoon that challenges the way you think about America’s history and civic life – and...

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    How We Incarcerate Young People: A Conversation about Policy and Neuroscience

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Across the United States, children under the age of 18 can be tried as adults in criminal court. Although the practice is condemned by international law, we are the only country in the world that sentences young people to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At the same time, recent developments in neuroscience research demonstrate that the human brain is not fully developed until after the age of 25.

    This program will consider the ways we punish young people in the American criminal legal system and how our policies could be reformed. We will bring together a...

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    Twenty Million Angry Men: A Conversation about the Importance of Including People with Felony Convictions in Our Jury System

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    In the United States, 8 percent of the adult population—and 33 percent of the Black adult male population—has a felony conviction. Even after people have served time in prison, they are systematically excluded from civic participation, including serving on juries. Offered in collaboration with the Institute to End Mass Incarceration at Harvard Law School, this program will explore questions of jury service, civic participation in the criminal legal system, and the importance of such participation by people with prior convictions.

    ...

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    Multilateral Cultural Diplomacy: A Conversation with UNESCO Director General Audrey Azoulay

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    In the third installment of the Future of Cultural Diplomacy Series, UNESCO’s Director-General Audrey Azoulay will offer her unique perspective on cultural diplomacy as the leader of one of the world’s largest multilateral agencies focused on education, scientific and cultural issues.

    In a conversation co-moderated by Ambassador Nicholas Burns and Carla Dirlikov Canales, Director-General Azoulay will discuss UNESCO’s current priorities, including education, culture, gender equality, and freedom of expression, and discuss how UNESCO has provided multilateral approaches to...

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    Radcliffe Day 2021

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    On Radcliffe Day 2021—Friday, May 28—Harvard Radcliffe Institute will award the Radcliffe Medal to Melinda Gates. 

    Expert panelists will then discuss achieving gender equity in the United States, each offering her own perspective informed by deep expertise and unique experience. The discussion will be moderated by the distinguished American historian and Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University Drew Gilpin Faust, who was founding dean of the Radcliffe Institute and the first woman to serve as president of Harvard.

    Following the panel...

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    The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy—Online

    May 31, 2021 marks the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, when a violent white mob nearly destroyed the formerly thriving and prosperous African American community in the Greenwood district of Tulsa (also known as Black Wall Street). Over 300 African Americans were killed, and thousands were displaced. Hundreds of homes and businesses burned to the ground. In the decades since this occurred, the massacre was covered up, local officials obstructed the redevelopment of Greenwood, and the local chapter of the KKK became one of the largest in the U.S.

    Join the Carr...

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    Negotiating with Vladimir Putin

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School, Program on Negotiation—Online

    Bruce Allyn applies insight from the fields of negotiation and mediation to define practical steps that both US and Russian sides can take today to realize both individual and shared interests in a relationship that has descended into bitter enmity. We will look at how to "zoom out" to big-picture strategy—realizing what is at stake—and how to "zoom in" to Vladimir Putin the negotiator: his formative years, his heroes, his psychology, his intentions and current aspirations.

    Allyn will examine practical steps to break the cycle of offense and revenge that has...

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    Sakharov Centenary Seminar: Sakharov, Nuclear Weapons, and Human Rights

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    May 21 marks the centenary of the birth of Andrei Sakharov, one of the great physicists of the twentieth century who was also one of the world’s most courageous and renowned proponents of freedom and human rights. His name nowadays is universally linked with the quest for human rights and democracy.

    As the key figure in the Soviet Union’s development of a thermonuclear bomb, Sakharov could have enjoyed a life of privilege and luxury. But to do so would have meant closing his eyes to the injustice and repression around him. This was something that Sakharov, unlike the vast...

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    Vaccine Equity and Efficacy in the United States and the World

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    As efforts to distribute COVID-19 vaccines intensify throughout the United States and across the globe, how can we ensure that equity and access are prioritized? This panel seeks to address the challenges and opportunities of equitable public health strategies around COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

    ...

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    Beyond Brown: Leading for Racial Equity in a Southern Context

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    The Southern Black community catalyzed the movement for free public schools for all children. This community also led the efforts to desegregate schools. Despite these efforts, the South remains home to some of the largest educational inequities within our nation. Yet, many discussions about educational equity are devoid of Southern representation. This is problematic considering that Southern states have higher rates of poverty and are home to one-third of all K-12 students, 56% of all Black students, and one-third of our nation’s ELL and migrant student populations.

    This...

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    Carmen Reinhart – Lessons from History for the COVID Economic Recovery

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    At a time when U.S. federal debt is at its highest level since World War II—and the post-COVID economic recovery around the world remains uncertain—join the Belfer Center’s Applied History Project for an open session of our Applied History Work Group. Its members—distinguished historians and public servants—study the past to illuminate the most pressing challenges we face today.

    For this session, the Applied History Working Group is delighted to welcome Carmen Reinhart, the Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group, for a discussion on economic...

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