Events

    Engendering Democracy: The Significance of Abortion Legalization in Argentina

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    In December 2020, first trimester abortion was legalized in Argentina with the passage of Law 27.610. This historic move presents an inflection point for Argentine democracy, as well as a case study in how rights concepts can be deployed effectively to advance reproductive justice.

    In this event, key actors in the long struggle for legalization — including representatives from the executive and the legislative branches of government, as well as civil society, together with legal academics and health professionals — will describe the complicated and multi-staged narrative of...

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    Prospects for Post-COVID Economic Recovery in Latin America

    Location: 

    David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard—Online

    The economic toll of the Covid crisis on Latin America has been catastrophic. According to The Economist, whereas global GDP contracted by 3% last year, that of Latin America and the Caribbean fell on average by 7%, the worst of any region tracked by the IMF. Lengthy lockdowns have contributed to the exacerbation of poverty and inequality, and school closures threaten a looming crisis of human capital formation. Panelists review the reasons for the magnitude of the crisis, why Latin America’s recovery lags the rest of the world, and above all how Latin America will recover from the...

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    Inspiration, Empathy and Education: How Cultural Entities Are Helping People Think about Climate in New Ways

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    As the world has sought to understand the causes and impacts of climate change, the topic has long been situated within the domain of science. In the 21st century, data, studies, reports, and academic/technical discourses have been the central mechanisms by which we learn about and process climate change: its consequences, our roles, and possible solutions. In recent years, however, artists and cultural institutions have developed a powerful interest in the topic and begun to employ myriad strategies by which to explore, draw attention to, and process it. There is an evolving...

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    Our Bodies, Ourselves Book Talk

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The final installment in the summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature a discussion of Our Bodies, Ourselves, first published in 1971. This event is organized in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the book’s first edition and in connection with the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective Records housed in the Schlesinger Library. The event will also include audience Q&A.

    ...

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    Book Talk with Daniel Carpenter

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The third installment of the Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Daniel Carpenter, author of Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790–1870 (Harvard University Press, 2021). Carpenter is the faculty director of the social sciences at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and the Allie S. Freed Professor of Government in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

    Carpenter's reading will be followed by a discussion with Nikki M. Taylor, professor of history and chair of the Department of History at Howard University. The event will also include an...

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    Book Talk with Tiya Miles

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The second installment of the Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Tiya Miles, author of All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley’s Sack, a Black Family Keepsake (Random House, 2021). Miles is a Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and a professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

    Miles's reading will be followed by a discussion with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and...

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    Book Talk with Clint Smith

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The first installment in the summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Clint Smith, author of How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America (Little, Brown and Company, 2021) and staff writer at The Atlantic. Smith's reading will be followed by a discussion with Kyera Singleton, executive director of the Royall House and Slave Quarters, in Medford, Massachusetts. The event will also include audience Q and A.

    ...

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    How We Incarcerate Young People: A Conversation about Policy and Neuroscience

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Across the United States, children under the age of 18 can be tried as adults in criminal court. Although the practice is condemned by international law, we are the only country in the world that sentences young people to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At the same time, recent developments in neuroscience research demonstrate that the human brain is not fully developed until after the age of 25.

    This program will consider the ways we punish young people in the American criminal legal system and how our policies could be reformed. We will bring together a...

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    Twenty Million Angry Men: A Conversation about the Importance of Including People with Felony Convictions in Our Jury System

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    In the United States, 8 percent of the adult population—and 33 percent of the Black adult male population—has a felony conviction. Even after people have served time in prison, they are systematically excluded from civic participation, including serving on juries. Offered in collaboration with the Institute to End Mass Incarceration at Harvard Law School, this program will explore questions of jury service, civic participation in the criminal legal system, and the importance of such participation by people with prior convictions.

    ...

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    COVID-19 and the Law: The Health Care System in the Age of COVID-19

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    This seminar series will consider the ethical, legal, regulatory, and broader social and institutional impacts that COVID-19 has had, as well as the longer-lasting effects it may have on our society. This fifth seminar in the series will focus on how the health care system has reacted and evolved during the pandemic.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost all aspects of life in the United States and around the world, disrupting the global economy as well as countless institutions. The issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic present a critical juncture for the U.S. and other...

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    The Future of Diplomacy is Female: A Conversation with Secretary Madeleine Albright

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School—Online

    The U.S. and the world are at an inflection point, where resilient leadership and strategic reimagining of alliances, competition, and power are needed to rebuild at home and abroad. Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, with her steady voice of reason and analysis, consistently warning of the dangers of fascism and championing the ideals of democracy, is a source of inspiration to women and girls around the world.

    Drawing on her decades of experience, Secretary Albright will discuss the leadership qualities needed to face new diplomatic challenges of the 21st century...

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    Lessons Learned from Anti-Equality Mobilization

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    The 21st century Central European illiberal transformation is a process deeply reliant on gender politics. A feminist analysis is central to understanding the current regime changes, both in terms of their ideological underpinnings, and with respect to their modus operandi. Key aspects of this phenomenon are: 1. opposition to the liberal equality paradigm has become a key ideological space where the illiberal alternative to the post-1989 (neo)liberal project is being forged; 2. family mainstreaming and anti-gender policies have been one of the main pillars on which the illiberal state...

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    The History of Structural Racism in Charlottesville: Legally-Enforced Segregation and Its Impact on Health

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    Using Charlottesville as a case study, Dayna Bowen Matthew, JD, PhD, Dean and Harold H. Greene Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School, explores the theory, mechanisms, and impact on health of legally-mandated residential segregation and how we can identify and redress historical inequities.

    ...

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    The COVID “Next Normal”: Lessons from the NBA Bubble and Vaccine Modeling

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    As the coronavirus pandemic enters a new phase, science that can guide vaccination prioritization and business’ return-to-work strategies are more important than ever. In this webinar, we will explore the experience of the NBA bubble, in which players were sequestered at the Walt Disney World Resort. Data from this longitudinal testing program has important implications for our understanding of the natural history of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the utility of frequent testing strategies. In addition, we will discuss modeling studies that compare different...

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    The Politics of Health Policy: Integrating Racial Justice into Health Care and Clinical Research

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    What are political determinants of health? How have they driven inequities in the U.S. health care system? Daniel Dawes, JD, director of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute Morehouse School of Medicine, shares an inclusive approach to addressing health issues impacting the most vulnerable populations in an increasingly complex...

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    Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation

    Location: 

    Harvard Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History—Online

    Join a post-election conversation with Latosha Brown, Black Voters Matter) and Warren Center American Democracy Fellow. 

    Moderated by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy, HKS; Suzanne Young Murray Professor, Radcliffe.

    Learn more and RSVP for Black Voters Matter: A Post-Election Conversation.

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    Enduring Unethical Lessons from the Past: Learning from the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    The United States Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee is used as a case study of the exploitation of communities of color at the hands of medical professionals. What are the lessons learned and how far has medical ethics really come in terms of the treatment of Black and other communities of color? Lillie Head, president of Voices for Our Fathers Legacy Foundation, and Riggins R. Earl, Jr...

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    Shaping the Future for Learners Around the World: The Opportunities, Innovations, and Challenges of Higher Education Now

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Join two of Harvard's most innovative higher education leaders to explore the decision-making, curricular changes, pedagogical opportunities, and digital reinventions prompted by the pandemic and the shift to remote learning over the past year. How will the mass experiment on Zoom alter the landscape of higher education in the future, for learners around the world? What are the opportunities for increased engagement, participation, and collaboration? What are the advantages and challenges, and what are the lessons learned, both at Harvard and at institutions around the world?

    ...

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    Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic

    Location: 

    Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard—Online

    Book Panel on Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic by Álvaro Santana-Acuña

    Gabriel García Márquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude seemed destined for obscurity upon its publication in 1967. The little-known author, small publisher, magical style, and setting in a remote Caribbean village were hardly the usual ingredients for success in the literary marketplace. Yet today it ranks among the best-selling books of all time. Translated into dozens of languages, it continues to enter the lives...

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    What Does Public Service Mean To You?

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Center for Public Leadership—Online

    Public service comes in many forms. Whether through non-profits, government, or the military, our students have served in diverse ways all across the globe. Following a special introduction by CPL director Amb. Wendy R. Sherman, hear from three of the Kennedy School's own in a discussion over the different forms of public service as we kick off Public Service Week.

    PANELISTS:

    Hassaan Ebrahim MPP 2021, CEO, Hikma Health
    Charlene Han MC/MPA 2021, Former Policy Director, Singapore Ministry of Social and Family Development
    Bill Walker MC/MPA 2021, Former Marine...

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