Events

    The New Geopolitical Order

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The new geopolitical environment taking shape in many parts of the world tends toward increasing authoritarianism and nationalistic competition. In this lecture, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, an international human rights advocate and the former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, will argue that the world’s people deserve better. Despite the demagoguery and isolationism that some leaders are pursuing, he believes it is possible to pursue thoughtful diplomacy and a system of connectivity, coalitions, and partnerships to reform institutions and change polices.

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    Conducting Oneself: Choreographing Bodies and Identities On and Off the Podium

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    At Radcliffe, Daniel M. Callahan is beginning his second book, “Conducting Oneself,” which examines how the bodies, identities, and repertoire of orchestra conductors produce, legitimate, and limit their movements on the podium and off, from conservatories to coveted positions. Drawing on movement analysis, oral history, and affect theory, the project explores how conductors visibly embody their empathy with scores while simultaneously projecting expertise and power.

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    History Reconsidered: Poetry Reading and Discussion

    Location: 

    Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    Join the Radcliffe Institute for a poetry reading and discussion with Clint Smith.

    Clint Smith is a doctoral candidate at Harvard University and an Emerson Fellow at New America. He has received fellowships from the Art For Justice Fund, Cave Canem, and the National Science Foundation, while his writing has been published in the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, Poetry Magazine, the Paris Review, and elsewhere. His first full-length collection of poetry, Counting Descent, was published in 2016. It won the 2017...

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    Opening Lecture: Painting Edo

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    As part of the Harvard Art Museums' opening celebration for Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection, SOAS University of London art history professor Timon Screech will present "Into the Kaleidoscope: Painting in Edo Japan."

    Tickets are required for the lecture and may be acquired in person, by phone, or online for a small fee through the Harvard Box Office. Limit of two tickets per person.

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    Ancient Egyptian Culture and Its Continuity in Modern Egypt

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Egypt’s recorded history spans six thousand years and is therefore one of the longest and best known in the world. Today, Egyptians practice several religious, artistic, and social traditions that can be traced to ancient Egypt, demonstrating the power and longevity of cultural memory. Drawing on research in archaeology, Egyptian art, writing, and culture, Fayza Haikal will examine Egyptian society’s cultural expressions from antiquity to the present, focusing on language, spirituality, superstitions, funerary traditions, and folklore.

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    Opening Celebration: Painting Edo

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Art Museums to celebrate the opening of Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection, on view from February 14–July 26, 2020.

    Be among the first to see over 120 works included in the Harvard Art Museums' latest show, which celebrates the rich visual culture of Japan's early modern era. The galleries are open late, and admission is free for...

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    Lev Rubinstein: Readings, Conversations about Russia Today

    Location: 

    Davis Center, Knafel Building, Room K262, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    Moscow writer Lev Rubinstein will read from his work and engage in a wide-ranging conversation in a special Davis Center seminar.

    Rubinstein exemplifies a striking aesthetic response to life in repressive times, one that emphasizes the artist’s freedom of expression and the power of humor in the face of lies. He has won multiple prizes at home and abroad and has a readiness to push at the boundaries of literary norms. Author of more than a dozen books in Russian, Rubinstein has been more active as an essayist since the start of the 2000s. He has also emerged as a public figure...

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    Lecture: no noise disturbed the quiet of the morning

    Location: 

    Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    As a Radcliffe fellow, Anthony Romero (RI '20) is working on a multimedia research and visual art project that includes a collection of related but discrete works which attempt to articulate how indigenous populations, under European colonial rule in Australia, South Asia, and the United States, were controlled through the criminalization and legislating of native sound and music practices. Taken together, these histories reveal how carceral and criminalizing strategies sowed the seeds for the ongoing over-policing of black and brown communities.

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    Lecture: Diary of a Tap Dancer

    Location: 

    Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    During her fellowship, Ayodele Casel (RI '20) is working on Diary of a Tap Dancer, a theatrical work positioning tap dance as the driving force of the narrative. This project aims to create a fuller and more accurate picture of the legacy of the art form by centering the voices of its unnamed women within a broader historical context. Diary explores shared themes of hoofers past and present with stories illuminating the struggle and joy of expression, communication, the evolution of jazz music, gender inequality, and the personal and culturally devastating implications for women...

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    Lecture: The Imprint of the Landscape

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Please join us for the Frederick Law Olmsted Lecture delivered by landscape architect Günther Vogt. Vogt's lecture will also mark the opening of the exhibition Günther Vogt: First the Forests, which is on view in the Druker Design Gallery from January 21–March 8, 2020. A reception in the gallery will take place immediately following the lecture.

    What is the relevant scale for operating with the landscape of the city?

    Since the Industrial Revolution at the latest, humans have become the determining factor for global ecosystems. This fact becomes...

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    Uncharted Exclaves — Modernism and Other -Isms in the Practices of Taiwanese Architecture

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Throughout its history, Taiwan has been the laboratory for architectural experiments, or more precisely, the exclaves of all architectural movements and the -isms. It was the last frontier for southern style Chinese architecture, the experimental field for Japanese young architects' endeavors, the perpetual battle ground for “Contemporary Chinese” versus “Traditional Taiwanese”, the restless landscape for postmodernism and its two non-formal counterparts, critical regionalism (Tzonis, Alexander & Liane Lefaivre / Kenneth Frampton) and dirty realism (Lefaivre, L. / Jameson, F.), and...

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    Gallery Talk: Walk Like an Egyptian

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Fellow Jen Thum explores the basics of ancient Egyptian representation, including why their bodies seem to "walk like an Egyptian."

    Free with museum admission. Gallery talks are limited to 15 people and tickets are required. Ten minutes before each talk, tickets will become available at the admissions desk.

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    The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World’s Oldest Bible

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Chanan Tigay is an award-winning journalist and nonfiction writer who has covered the Middle East, 9/11, and the United Nations for such outlets as AFP, the Atlantic, GQ, and the New Yorker. In this lecture, Tigay will talk about his first book, The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World’s Oldest Bible, which tells the story of the oldest Bible in the world, how its outing as a fraud led to a scandalous death, and why archaeologists now believe it was real—if only they could find it. In addition to the story of this controversial Bible, Tigay will speak about his own hunt for the...

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    The Call of Migratory Things

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    In this lecture, award-winning Nina McConigley, author of the short-story collection Cowboys and East Indians, will discuss her upcoming novel titled “The Call of Migratory Things.” With the landscape of the American West as the framework of this different kind of pioneer narrative, the novel considers how race, immigration, colonialism, post-frontier America, motherhood and fertility, and place intersect.

    This event is free and open to the public. 

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    Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Michelle Delk

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Michelle Delk is a passionate champion and designer of the urban public realm. Based in New York City, Michelle is a Partner and Landscape Architect with Snøhetta. Her work is trans-disciplinary, evocative, and representative of a simple foundational premise shared with Snøhetta: to create places that enhance the positive relationships between people and their environments. Both aspirational and pragmatic, her work reveals and complements the sublime qualities of embedded beauty and rational functionality within the...

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    The Remarkable Nature of Edward Lear

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Museum Natural History for a public lecture with Robert McCracken Peck, Curator of Art and Artifacts, Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University.

    Edward Lear (1812–1888), best known for The Owl and the Pussycat and other nonsense poetry, was also an accomplished painter of birds, mammals, reptiles, and landscapes, and an adventurous world traveler. His paintings of parrots, macaws, toucans, owls, and other birds are among the finest ever published. Robert McCracken Peck will discuss the remarkable life and natural history paintings of this...

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    The Future of Immortality: Remaking Life and Death in Contemporary Russia

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology for a public lecture and book signing with Anya Bernstein, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. 

    The international transhumanist movement believes that humans can harness science and technology to transcend their physical and mental limitations. Some of its practitioners support cryonics and the creation of robotic bodies for future “consciousness transfer.” Drawing from her ethnographic work among Russian transhumanists and her recent...

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    Rouse Visiting Artist Lecture: Susie Ibarra, “Listening and Creating Spatially: How do we hear in real life?”

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Composer/Percussionist Susie Ibarra creates music which often navigates how we hear in our environment and how our interdependence with each other and our surroundings informs and shapes these experiences. Ibarra will share several of her music works for performance and sound installations which include Fragility, A Game of Polyrhythms, a conducted game piece for performance which invites the audience to conduct an ensemble through polyrhythms; Music and Water Routes of the Medina of Fez , a music and architecture mobile app in collaboration with architect Aziza Chaouni, mapping with...

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    Human Sacrifice and Power in the Kerma Kingdom

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Join the Harvard Semitic Museum for a public lecture with Elizabeth Minor, Visiting Assistant Professor in Anthropology at Wellesley College. 

    The Kerma Kingdom was an ancient Nubian civilization located in present-day Sudan. Its capital, the city of Kerma, had monumental architecture and religious art depicting deities in the form of lions, scorpions, and hybrid figures such as winged giraffes and hippopotamus goddesses. During the Classic Kerma Period (1700–1550 BCE), funerary monuments of Kerman kings could be up to one hundred meters long and included hundreds of...

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