Events

    Harvard Design Magazine reveals "Harvard Design Magazine #48: America"

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    "A terrible mechanism [is] on the march, its gears multiplying." So begins the first essay of the 48th issue of Harvard Design Magazine, guest edited by Mark Lee, chair of the department of architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and Florencia Rodriguez, editorial director of -Ness Magazine. The issue takes as its theme the slippery and ambiguous figure of "America," seen through the lens of the built and unbuilt environment. Americanization—once the "terrible mechanism" bent on pressing capitalist values on emerging economies everywhere—is now in...

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    Mayors Imagining the Just City

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Following the inaugural MICD Just City Mayoral Fellowship–a collaboration between the Mayors’ Institute on City Design (MICD) and Harvard GSD's Just City Lab–the seven inaugural MICD Just City Mayoral Fellows discuss how to tackle racial injustices in each of their cities through planning and design interventions.

    Learn more about and register for Mayors Imagining the Just City.

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    Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem (Film Screening and Panel Discussion)

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Join the Harvard Law School Library for a live screening and panel discussion of “Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem,” a new documentary about the racial history and modern discrimination of the American misdemeanor system. The film, produced by Brave New Films and directed by Robert Greenwald, was inspired by HLS Professor Alexandra Natapoff’s book, “Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal.”

    ...

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    Think like a Historian, Imagine Like a Designer: A Conversation on Landscape History and Design Education

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    History is a manner of thinking about the world, grounded in the places we design, construct, and inhabit. Design offers the opportunity to re-imagine the world around us, today and for the future. We might draw from history, or draw upon it; certainly, it is to be hoped that we are drawn to it, as designers and historians. The purpose of landscape history—not reducible to memory nor timelines nor styles—is to produce and share knowledge of how we have come to be who and where we are. We will gather across studios we collectively inhabit to draw attention to and lessons from the...

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    Introducing Pairs 01: Giovanna Borasi in Conversation with the Founding Editors

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Join us to celebrate the launch of Pairs, a new student-led journal at the GSD. The founding editors will introduce the inaugural issue, which will be followed by a conversation with Giovanna Borasi, Director of the Canadian Centre for Architecture, on beginnings in curation and publishing.

    Pairs is a journal dedicated to conversations about design that are down to earth and unguarded. Each issue is conceptualized by an editorial team that proposes guests and objects to be in dialogue with one another. Pairs is non-thematic, meant instead for provisional thoughts and ideas in...

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    Troubling Images: Curating Collections of Historical Photographs

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Historical photography collections sometimes contain images that can be deeply troubling to contemporary viewers. What should be done with collections that include photographs of colonial violence, enslaved subjects, racist stereotypes, or other difficult imagery?

    Join moderator David Odo and photography curators Mark Sealy, Makeda Best, and Ilisa Barbash for a conversation about the challenges and possibilities of curating legacy collections of photographs today.

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    Reimagining Museums: Disruption and Change

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    As museums acknowledge their legacy as colonial institutions, many are reimagining their mission as agents of decolonization and social justice. The pandemic, the Black Lives Matter movement, and other community issues continue to create opportunities for reflection and growth. How can American museums—especially those that have strong relationships with Indigenous communities—respond to current national conditions of social unrest and political turmoil? How have New England museums fared and what is likely to happen over the next two to three years?

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    Edo Avant-Garde

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Edo Avant-Garde (2019) reveals the story of how Japanese artists of the explosively creative Edo period (1615–1868) pioneered innovative approaches to painting that many in the west associate most readily with so-called modern art of the 20th century. The Edo Avant-Garde documentary will be available to stream for free through the Harvard Art Museums from Friday, February 5 to Friday, February 12. Upon registration, you will receive a link and password to access the film. We encourage you to view the film in advance of the discussion!

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    Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic

    Location: 

    Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard—Online

    Book Panel on Ascent to Glory: How One Hundred Years of Solitude Was Written and Became a Global Classic by Álvaro Santana-Acuña

    Gabriel García Márquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude seemed destined for obscurity upon its publication in 1967. The little-known author, small publisher, magical style, and setting in a remote Caribbean village were hardly the usual ingredients for success in the literary marketplace. Yet today it ranks among the best-selling books of all time. Translated into dozens of languages, it continues to enter the lives...

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    Antique Inspirations, Fresh Creations

    Location: 

    Online Event

    James S. Snyder, HKS/MEI Senior Fellow, in conversation with award-winning Palestinian-Israeli architect Senan Abdelqader on the influences of Arab culture across time on art, architecture, and design in Israel, Palestine, and the world today. This event is part of the fall 2020 MEI series, James Snyder in Conversation: A series of dialogues on art, culture, politics, and the possibilities for transcending conflict through cultural connection in the modern Middle East.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

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    Author Discussion: Black And Buddhist: What Buddhism Can Teach Us about Race, Resilience, Transformation, and Freedom

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Buddhism is a way of life, a philosophy, a psychology,  a set of ethics, a religion, or a combination thereof. Central to the many ways Buddhism is understood is the achievement of emotional, mental, and psychological wellness. African Americans are at perpetual risk of psychological imbalance and trauma due to the social realities of racism in the United States. The authors engage the question, What can Buddhism offer African Americans who want to be emotionally resilient in a context they cannot...

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    2020 Visions

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Too often, the story of women’s suffrage unfolds in a vacuum, seemingly unconnected from the general contours of American history. This panel discussion looks back from the present, asking experts working in a variety of disciplines and organizations to briefly unfold, TED-talk style, a single “big idea” that captures the significance of the 19th Amendment for voting rights, citizenship, and democracy today.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

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    Music, Medicine, & Happiness

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    Fighting the coronavirus pandemic has brought Medical professionals across the country together in unexpected ways.

    At this event you will meet John Masko an HBS Case Researcher, Conductor and Founder of the National Virtual Medical Orchestra (NVMO) , who brought together over 50 medical professionals from across the country to build the first of its kind, a virtual orchestra.

    He will share a virtual performance which will be followed by a discussion around happiness as it relates to music with Arthur Brooks, a Harvard Professor, PHD Social Scientist, Best Selling...

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    Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    “What college does, it helps us learn about the nation,” said Rodney Spivey-Jones, a 2017 Bard College graduate currently incarcerated at Fishkill Correctional Facility in New York, in the docuseries College behind Bars. “It helps us become civic beings. It helps us understand that we have an interest in our community, that our community is a part of us and we are a part of it.”

    The Bard Prison Initiative and programs at other institutions of higher learning across the country have brought together teachers and learners in incarcerated spaces for years. This panel will gather...

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    The Architecture of Democracy

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In the week before the U.S. general election, Harvard and MIT will share a public discussion on the role of architecture in a representative democracy. Colleagues and students from across both institutions will join in dialogue on the profession’s role in supporting democratic society, now and in the future.

    Panelists participating in this event will be announced in the coming weeks.

    Learn more about and RSVP...

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    New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    By the early 1980s, a new political landscape was taking shape that would fundamentally influence American society and politics in the decades to come. That year, the long-standing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—championed by suffragist Alice Paul and introduced to Congress in 1923—ran aground, owing in significant measure to the activism of women who pioneered a new brand of conservatism.

    This panel will draw together strands and stories that are often kept separate: the ideas and growing influence of conservative women, the political activism of gay communities...

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    Immigration Speaker Series: ‘Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants’

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Michael Jones-Correa is President’s Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Director, Center for the Study of Ethnicity, Race and Immigration (CSERI). He is author of Holding Fast: Resilience and Civic Engagement Among Latino Immigrants (Russell Sage Foundation). His research centers on the topics of immigrant political incorporation and ethnic and racial relations in the United States, often writing about political behavior in the context of institutional structures.

    Our...

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    Emerging Scholars of Color Abroad

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Race in Focus: From Critical Pedagogies to Research Practice and Public Engagement in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies

    Among the first African Americans to join the American Communist Party and an important architect of communist approaches to race, racism, and African American equality, Lovett Fort- Whiteman (1889-1939) was one of the US citizens convinced (naively, to be sure) that Soviet society showed the way for overcoming racism in the United States. While visiting...

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    Marcus Samuelsson in Conversation with: Thelma Golden, Toni L. Griffin, and Mark Raymond

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Celebrated chef Marcus Samuelsson will share reflections on race, class, place and equity in the American food landscape, drawing from his forthcoming book The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food. He will then be joined by Professor in practice, Toni L. Griffin together with Thelma Golden and Mark Raymond for a conversation exploring the deep and intertwining relationships between memory, identity and authorship that exist for black creatives who reference, make and keep place through there work.

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    Addressing Homelessness: What Can (and Can’t) Architecture Do?

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In the 20th Annual John T. Dunlop Lecture, presented by the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, Michael Maltzan will discuss his work with the Skid Row Housing Trust and what it suggests about the ways in which architecture and other design professions can help address problems of housing affordability and homelessness. After the lecture, Mike Alvidrez, CEO Emeritus of the Skid Row...

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