Events

    2021 Nov 10

    Gutman Library Book Talk: 100 Days in Vietnam: A Memoir of Love, War, and Survival

    1:30pm to 3:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Painstakingly recreated from wartime letters and remembrances and contextualized by contemporary news accounts, 100 Days in Vietnam is a collaboration between Joe and his son Matthew A. Tallon, Ed.M.'09, Administrative Director of Faculty Support Services at HGSE, also an Army veteran.

    Here we experience the war through the emotions of the man who survived it: the drudgery and monotony of airfield life, the heartache of a newlywed missing his wife, the terror of combat missions, the agony of injury and rehabilitation, and the bittersweet relief from the completion of...

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    2021 Nov 09

    After-School Animal Encounters: Teeming Tidepools

    4:00pm to 4:45pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Tidepools exist where the land meets the ocean and the amazingly resilient creatures that live there manage the challenges of both environments. From swimming and climbing to burrowing, animals in tidepools have adapted many behaviors to live in an ever-changing world. Join human museum staffers Javier and Ryan as they lead you in a 45-minute program with live ocean invertebrates. This event will be fun for the whole family so bring your questions and sense of wonder.

    ...

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    2021 Nov 08

    The Climate of Resistance

    7:00pm to 8:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    This conversation is part of the series "Weather Reports: The Climate of Now." The featured speakers are Chloe Aridjis, award-winning novelist, Sea Monsters (2020) and organizer for Writers Rebel, and Wanjira Mathai, Regional Director for Africa at the World Resources Institute.

    Activists Aridjis and Mathai are powerful, fierce, compassionate leaders in the global environmental movement. A writer and an organizer, they are also the daughters of iconic conservation heroes: Homero Aridjis,...

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    2021 Nov 05

    Michael Twitty, "Beyond 'Slave Food': Re-Organizing the Perceptions and Potential of African American Foodways"

    6:00pm to 7:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Culinary historian Michael Twitty, author of the James Beard-winning book, The Cooking Gene, discusses the impact of the collective perceptions of African American foodways on how we experience a broader vision of healing. With such foodways often stigmatized as a continuation of socio-cultural trauma or defended with a mark of "authentic" racial identity, Twitty offers alternative ways to see how the revitalization of ancestral foodways and culinary justice is a necessary part of our collective national experience.

    ...

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    2021 Nov 05

    Vernal Life: Ruth Easterbrook (Opening Reception and Talk)

    5:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Gallery 224, Harvard Ceramics Program, 224 Western Ave., Allston

    Solo exhibition of work by Ruth Easterbrook, 2019-20 Artist In Residence at the Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard.

    Opening Reception is on Friday, November 5 from 5:00pm–7:00pm with a gallery talk at 6:00pm; advance registration required for in-person or...

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    2021 Nov 05

    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 1)

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In the 17th century, the Dutch Republic was a fast-paced, successful, modern society—economically, politically, and artistically. The work ethic of its citizens amazed foreign visitors, who compared the Dutch to crawling ants. Its flourishing art production showed the bustle of everyday life with almost scientific precision. Yet many artworks amassed by Dutch citizens in their homes portray scenes of silence and serenity. Such works, including genre pieces by Johannes Vermeer and still lifes featuring fruit, nuts or bread by Willem Heda and Adriaen Coorte, suggest a deep engagement with...

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    2021 Nov 05

    ArtsBites: Playwright Jocelyn Bioh

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Office for the Arts at Harvard—Online

    ArtsBites is the OFA round-table discussion series with undergraduate students and visiting artists. Discover and explore how you can create an expressive career and a performative life. Join us for a conversation with Jocelyn Bioh, performer and playwright who adapted Merry Wives of Windsor for Shakespeare in the Park in New York City. This event is in partnership with Harvard BlackCAST.

    Learn more and RSVP for this...

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    2021 Nov 04

    Virtual Student Guide Tour: This Land Is Whose Land?, with Jacqueline Zoeller

    8:00pm to 8:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    On this tour commemorating Native American Heritage Month, Jacqueline Zoeller ’23 will contrast colonial visions of the Western U.S. landscape, such as Albert Bierstadt’s Rocky Mountains, “Lander’s Peak” (1863), with the realities lived and portrayed by Native American artists. Stops on the tour will include Diné artist Will Wilson’s Mexican Hat Disposal Cell (2020), a landscape photograph of Halchita, Utah, the Navajo...

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    2021 Nov 03

    Carl M. Sapers Ethics in Practice Lecture: Eric Klinenberg, “Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life”

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The future of democratic societies rests not simply on shared values but on shared spaces: the libraries, childcare centers, and parks where crucial connections are formed. Drawing on extensive sociological research, Klinenberg claims that “social infrastructure,” which he defines as the physical spaces that shape our interactions, plays an essential but unappreciated role in modern societies, generating inequalities in health, education, crime, climate vulnerability, and social networks. In this lecture, he shares key findings from his landmark book, Palaces for the People, and...

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    2021 Oct 28

    Shea Burke Artist In Residence Lecture

    5:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard—Online

    The Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard presents a series of lectures by 2021-22 Artists In Residence.

    Shea Burke is a ceramic artist from Rochester New York. Their work employs the ceramic vessel as a container for thoughts and histories around their Black biracial ancestry. Shea dreams of their role as a future ancestor themself. Shea received their BFA from Alfred University in 2017 and an MFA from School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2021. They were the recipient of a Zenobia Award for a residency at Watershed Ceramics in 2018.

    ...

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    2021 Oct 27

    Between Worlds: China’s WWII Interpreters and Their Divergent Fates in China, Taiwan, and the United States

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    David Cheng Chang is an associate professor of humanities and the associate director of Global China Center at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. While at Radcliffe, he is using interdisciplinary source materials to write a book that will weave together the personal histories of more than 3,000 Chinese interpreters for the American and British allied forces during World War II with the larger military, political, diplomatic, and social history of World War II, the Chinese Civil War, the Korean War, and the Cold War. Join Chang as he discusses this project and the...

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    2021 Oct 26

    Daniela Bleichmar, “The history of cochineal and the changing value of Mexican indigenous environmental knowledge, ca. 1500–1800”

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Before the development of synthetic dyes in the second half of the 1800s, natural dyes were some of the most prized and sought-after commodities in the global economy. This talk uses historical images and texts to excavate changing approaches to indigenous environmental knowledge in colonial Mexico and early modern Europe through the study of cochineal.

    This insect, native to the Americas, produced the world's best quality and most valuable red dye from the 1520s until the rise of the modern chemical dye industry. Long used by indigenous people in the Americas, under Spanish...

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    2021 Oct 25

    The Climate of Grief

    7:00pm to 8:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    This conversation is part of the series "Weather Reports: The Climate of Now." The featured speaker is poet Victoria Chang.

    Victoria Chang writes in her New York Times Notable Book of 2020, Obit, “I always knew that grief was something I could smell. But I didn’t know that it’s not actually a noun but a verb. That it moves.” After the deaths of her parents, she refused to write elegies; instead, Chang wrote poetic obituaries of the beautiful, broken world that surrounds her (many see them...

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    2021 Oct 25

    Rachel Dorothy Tanur Memorial Lecture: Andrea Roberts, “The Community Core: Making and Keeping Place Heritage in Texas’s Freedom Colonies”

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    In Texas’ freedom colonies — African American settlements founded 1866-1930 — descendants of community founders engage in heritage conservation by keeping folklife, sacred rituals, and other cultural expressions that sustain communities’ Black sense of place. However, rural, vernacular African American placekeeping strategies are rarely framed in planning and architectural history as transgressive or expressions of Black liberation.

    Presenting an excerpt from her forthcoming book, Never Sell the Land, Dr. Roberts shares case studies in which descendants of Deep East...

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    2021 Oct 22

    Decoding AI: The Science, Policies, Applications, and Ethics of Artificial Intelligence

    10:00am to 4:20pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly permeating many facets of our lives, raising both hope and concern about possibilities for our future. AI is transforming domains as disparate as science, medicine, commerce, government, law, the military, and the arts, and in doing so, it is forcing us to grapple with practical, political, and philosophical questions about humans and the nature of human interaction. The Harvard Radcliffe Institute Science Symposium, featuring speakers from disparate disciplines and industries, will examine AI, its impact, and its ethics by exploring current and...

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    2021 Oct 21

    Jane Bennett, “Out for a Walk in the Middle Voice”

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    It begins with two strolls: one by the 19th-century naturalist Henry Thoreau, who finds himself inscribed by vegetal forms and powers; and one by Paul Klee's graphic line as it enlists the energies of a human hand to become a doodle. These two walks expose the radical entanglement of human and nonhuman activities, and they call for a lexicon able to acknowledge such a trans-specied kind of agency.

    How to bespeak such joint efforts in ways that give the nonhuman its due? What grammar, syntax, and verbal forms best acknowledge the contributions of human, animal, vegetal, mineral...

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    2021 Oct 21

    Andrew Castañeda Artist In Residence Lecture

    5:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard—Online

    The Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard presents a series of lectures by 2021-22 Artists In Residence.

    Andrew Castañeda grew up surfing and skateboarding in sunny southern California. While he fully embraces the spontaneity of life as an artist, he is also a true Virgo and works hard to move forward, always. Andrew has work in two private collections: The American Museum of Ceramic Arts at Pomona, CA and the Kansas City Art Institute Teaching Collection. Andrew earned his BFA in ceramics from the Kansas City Art Institute, and then his MFA from Penn State...

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    2021 Oct 20

    The Healing Power of Friendships and Relationships

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    The pandemic has caused many of us to recognize the power of relationships—for ourselves, and for our children. Have your children's friendships changed—or suffered? Are your students finding it hard to re-ignite their stalled connections? How can schools help to foster friendship—and prioritize strong relationships and a sense of belonging for every student? And what are the lessons we can take with us into our own adult lives?

    Join us as we explore the sustaining power of friendships and relationships. Let's identify the ways in which relationships give us strength, help us...

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