Events

    2020 Mar 07

    Weekend Matinee: The Place Promised in Our Early Days

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge

     

    Makoto Shinkai's remarkable feature film debut is set in a futuristic Japan on the verge of war. Takuya, a physicist, is drawn into a complex world of dreams, revolutionary fronts, government conspiracies and multiple realities. After many years, he reunites with his high school pal in their shared grief over their missing friend Sayuri, upon whose mysterious fate the whole world may depend.

    Admission: $5 Weekend Matinee Admission or Free with Cambridge Public Library Card or current Harvard Student ID

     

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    2020 Mar 07

    Uncovering Pacific Pasts: Harvard’s Early Endeavors in Oceanic Anthropology

    Sat Mar 7 (All day) to Sun Mar 7 (All day)

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

    This exhibit explores how early Harvard scholars influenced the development of anthropology and archaeology in the Pacific region. Produced in collaboration with over thirty other museums around the world, Harvard’s contributing exhibit will feature historical images and objects from the Peabody collections, including intricately carved Fijian clubs, models of distinctive Pacific outriggers, and a striking example of Samoan bark cloth (siapo). Together they weave a compelling narrative about the ideas, people, and networks pivotal to both early understandings and ongoing studies...

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    2020 Mar 05

    The Khufu Boat

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    In 1954, Egyptian archaeologist Kamal el-Mallakh discovered a 144-foot ship buried next to the Great Pyramid of Giza. The Khufu boat—one of the oldest-known planked vessels from antiquity—was interred in honor of Khufu, the pharaoh who built the Great Pyramid. Bob Brier will discuss what is known about the design, propulsion, and function of this 4,600-year- old ship, based on recent tank tests conducted on a model. He will also highlight plans to build a full-scale replica of the vessel and to place it on the Nile.

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    2020 Mar 03

    International Womxn’s Day Lecture: Dr. Vandana Shiva

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Dr. Vandana Shiva is trained as a Physicist and did her Ph.D. on the subject “Hidden Variables and Non-locality in Quantum Theory” from the University of Western Ontario in Canada. She later shifted to inter-disciplinary research in science, technology and environmental policy, which she carried out at the Indian Institute of Science and the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore. In 1982, she founded an independent institute, the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology in Dehra Dun dedicated to high quality and independent research to address the most...

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    2020 Mar 03

    Who Discovered Evolution?

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Charles Darwin is commonly cited as the person who “discovered” evolution. But, the historical record shows that roughly seventy different individuals published work on the topic of evolution between 1748 and 1859, the year that Darwin published On the Origin of Species. These early thinkers, now almost entirely forgotten, included biologists, geologists, horticulturists, physicians, clergymen, atheists, philosophers, teachers, and poets.

    William Friedman will discuss the ideas of these pre-Darwinian evolutionists, place Darwin in a broader historical context, and...

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    2020 Mar 02

    Lecture: Seed Sovereignty and ‘Our Living Relatives’ in Native American Community Farming and Gardening

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Gund Hall, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Native heirloom seed varieties, many of which have been passed down through generations of Indigenous gardeners or re-acquired from seed banks or ally seed savers, are often discussed by Indigenous farmers as the foundation of the food sovereignty movement, and as helpful tools for education and reclaiming health. This presentation explores how Native American community-based farming and gardening projects are defining heirloom or heritage seeds; why maintaining and growing out these seeds is seen as so important, and how terms like seed sovereignty should be defined and enacted. Many of...

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    2020 Mar 01

    Concert: Parker Quartet

    3:00pm

    Location: 

    John Knowles Paine Concert Hall, 3 Oxford St., Cambridge

    As part of the Blodgett Chamber Music Series, the Parker Quartet will perform the following: Esa-Pekka Salonen Homunculus for String Quartet (2007); Szymanowski String Quartet #2, Opus 56; Beethoven String Quartet in A minor, Opus 132.

    Please note: This event is free but tickets are required, available February 16 at Harvard Box Office, Smith Campus Center. Box Office is open Tuesday—Sunday, 12:00pm–6:00pm. Tickets are also available by phone 617-496-2222 or online. There is a small service charge for online and phone orders.

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    2020 Feb 29

    Dig into Dinner

    1:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

    Explore the new Resetting the Table exhibition, starting at the dinner table set for a party. Family-friendly activities about what we eat will be set up throughout the gallery: drop in for smell stations, Play-Doh® desserts, games with prizes, and a raffle of dinner for two at a Harvard Square restaurant.

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    2020 Feb 27

    Film Screening: Dovlatov

    7:00pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S010 (Tsai Auditorium), 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    Dovlatov follows a few days in the life of famed Soviet writer, Sergei Dovlatov, on the eve of his friend's, future Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky, emigration in 1971. Sergei is determined to stay and lead a normal life with his wife Elena and daughter Katya, however, his manuscripts are regularly rejected by the official media as his point of view is deemed undesirable.

    Dovlatov premiered at the 2018 Berlin International Film Festival, where it was awarded a Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution for costume and production design. Directed by...

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    2020 Feb 27

    Saving America’s Cities: The Past, Present, and Future of Urban Revitalization

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Can past efforts to revitalize America’s cities inform contemporary strategies to address the problems of economic inequality, unaffordable housing, segregated neighborhoods, and deteriorating infrastructure?

    That question, in part, informs Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age, a new book by Lizabeth Cohen, Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University and former Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

    Cohen will discuss this history and will be joined in...

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    2020 Feb 27

    The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the tenth and eleventh centuries. The causes continue to be investigated and debated. Paleoenvironmental research over the past twenty years has revealed that the demise coincided with a prolonged, intensive drought that extended across the region, providing compelling evidence that climate change played a key role in the collapse of the Maya. Billie Turner will examine this evidence and the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

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    2020 Feb 27

    The New Geopolitical Order

    4:15pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The new geopolitical environment taking shape in many parts of the world tends toward increasing authoritarianism and nationalistic competition. In this lecture, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, an international human rights advocate and the former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, will argue that the world’s people deserve better. Despite the demagoguery and isolationism that some leaders are pursuing, he believes it is possible to pursue thoughtful diplomacy and a system of connectivity, coalitions, and partnerships to reform institutions and change polices.

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    2020 Feb 26

    Olfaction in Science and Society

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    The sense of smell plays a critical role in human behavior, from warning us of potential dangers to attracting us to certain foods, places, and people. Harvard scientists Catherine Dulac and Venkatesh Murthy study the molecules, cells, and brain circuits that underlie olfaction and the social behaviors that aromas can elicit. In this program, they will engage in a conversation with internationally recognized olfactive expert Dawn Goldworm to discuss how neurobiological research on olfaction relates to our everyday experiences.

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    2020 Feb 26

    Conducting Oneself: Choreographing Bodies and Identities On and Off the Podium

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    At Radcliffe, Daniel M. Callahan is beginning his second book, “Conducting Oneself,” which examines how the bodies, identities, and repertoire of orchestra conductors produce, legitimate, and limit their movements on the podium and off, from conservatories to coveted positions. Drawing on movement analysis, oral history, and affect theory, the project explores how conductors visibly embody their empathy with scores while simultaneously projecting expertise and power.

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    2020 Feb 22

    Harvard Film Archive: Weekend Matinee

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The HFA continues its specially priced screenings of films for children and accompanying adults, plus a special selection for teenagers. Drawing from the Harvard Film Archive collection and beyond, this series of classic and contemporary films are screened in their original formats and languages.

    All Weekend Matinee screenings are admission-free for holders of a valid Cambridge Public Library card!

    Schedule
    December 15: Three Wishes for Cinderella
    January 25: Tito and the Birds
    February 8: Whisper of the Heart
    ...

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