Events

    Amazing Archaeology Fair at Harvard 2019

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

    Join Harvard archaeology students in the museum galleries as they share their experience from excavations around the world and across time. Examine artifacts and see what archaeologists do. Try launching a spear with a spear thrower (weather permitting), carve cuneiform writing on clay, and experience up-to-the-minute technologies such as 3D printing and augmented reality. Test your listening skills in the World Music Challenge game hosted by colleagues from the social anthropology department. Activities will be spread across both the Peabody and the Harvard Semitic Museums.

    ...

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    Conference: Unsettled Citizens

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Populism, global crisis, and modernity have rendered citizenship an ever-more fluid and troubled concept. This conference will explore all of these themes. In the first panel, we will debate the concept of economic citizenship, asking to what extent citizenship can be bought, constituted, or even lost by means of variation in wealth. In a second panel on citizenship and its gatekeepers, our discussion will explore how states, tribes, and other communities regulate belonging. And in the third panel, we will examine how migration and cross-border identity challenge the concept of...

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    Lecture: Ancient Egyptian Gardens

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    The oldest documented gardens in the world are from ancient Egypt. Gardens were described in hieroglyphic texts and depicted in paintings, and many have been recovered through archaeology. From these sources we know that ancient Egyptians maintained gardens at temples and tombs, as well as at royal palaces and local residences.

    Drawing on comparisons among paintings of gardens from over fifty Egyptian tombs and archaeological garden sites, Christian Loeben (Egyptologist and Keeper of Egyptian and Islamic Arts, Museum August Kestner, Hanover, Germany) will highlight the...

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    Exhibition Opening: Beauties

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Beauties is a newly commissioned exhibition by noted contemporary American sculptor, printer, and conceptual and visual artist Willie Cole. He is known for using irons and ironing as central motifs in his work for 30 years, evoking everything from African masks to slave ship diagrams to the routines of domestic servitude. In this special installation, the gallery will be lined with haunting, full-scale prints made from crushed and hammered ironing boards, allowing visitors to confront the contradictory energies running through them.

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    Magic and Demonology in Ancient Egypt

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Ancient Egyptian texts and objects associated with funerary rituals often include references to “magic” and “demons.” Rita Lucarelli will look at how these concepts were defined and used in ancient Egypt, with a special focus on the roles that demons played in magical practices and spells. Through an examination of textual and material sources produced from the early Pharaonic to the Greco-Roman periods, she will also address how Egyptian beliefs about demons compare with those of other ancient cultures.

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    February Vacation Week Activities

    Location: 

    Harvard Semitic Museum, 6 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

    Free, fun, family activities allow visitors to explore arts from the ancient Near East. Activities change daily: make Egyptian accessories, inscribe clay tablets, or decode hieroglyphics. Drop in for five minutes--or 30--to see what is new every day.

    Activities take place on the first floor of the Harvard Semitic Museum. This HMSC museum explores the rich history of cultures connected by the family of Semitic languages. Exhibitions include a full-scale replica of an ancient Israelite home, life-sized casts of famous Mesopotamian monuments, authentic mummy...

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    Countering Authoritarianism and Nationalism: Russia Needs Multiple Liberal Leaders

    Location: 

    Center for Government and International Studies South Building, Room S354, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Join us at the Center for Government and International Studies for a comparative politics seminar, "Countering Authoritarianism and Nationalism: Russia Needs Multiple Liberal Leaders," with speaker Zhanna Nemtsova.

    After studying economics at the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), Zhanna Nemtsova pursued a career in journalism at the Russian business news channel RBC TV, where she worked as a host and interviewed political and business figures. Following the assassination of her father, political opposition leader and Putin-critic Boris Nemtsov in...

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    Are Koreans Human? A Lecture with Best-Selling Author Min Jin Lee

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Who are the modern Koreans, and what do they care about? Koreans have experienced colonialism, diaspora, war, national division, immigration, and a persistent nuclear threat—and yet, they have achieved extraordinary gains in their homelands and elsewhere. Min Jin Lee, the author of the novels Free Food for Millionaires and Pachinko who is working on the third novel of The Koreans trilogy, will explore the will of Koreans to survive and flourish as global citizens, their enduring faith in education, and the costs of such a quest and what it may mean...

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    Bear at the Border: Russian Foreign Policy in Europe

    Location: 

    CGIS South Building, Room S354, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Russia has become increasingly assertive on the world stage, particularly in its intent to maintain a sphere of influence in Eurasia and Eastern Europe. More recently, Moscow has also become comfortable with interfering in Western Europe through asymmetric means. What is the Russian government’s strategy toward Europe? What are the levers of influence at the Kremlin's disposal and how does it wield them in Eastern vs Western Europe? At this seminar, Dr. Busygina and Dr. Polyakova will discuss the opportunities and constraints facing Russia with a specific look at Western Europe and...

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    Lecture and Book Signing: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    After World War II, evolutionary scientists began rethinking their views on humanity’s past. What if human history was not merely a cooperative struggle against a harsh environment? What if violence and war were normal states of existence, punctuated by brief moments of peace? These are the questions Erika Lorraine Milam explores in her new book, Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America. She will discuss how anthropologists and zoologists during the Cold-War era struggled to reconcile humanity’s triumph as a species with the possibility that this...

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    Family Workshop: Meet the First People of the Kalahari

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA

    Parents and children engage in hands-on activities to learn about the Ju/‘hoansi, the original people of the Kalahari desert, who hunted animals and gathered plant foods as a way of life until they took up farming in 1960. 

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    Unearthing Oral Histories

    Location: 

    PRX Podcast Garage, 267 Western Ave, Rear, Allston

    Join us on Thursday November 15th, for Unearthing Oral Histories, an oral history workshop held at the PRX Podcast Garage in connection to the exhibit In Over My Head, now on view at the Harvard Ed Portal. Led by artist Thalassa Raasch, this introductory workshop will unpack the power of collecting and sharing oral histories. Participants will develop an understanding of what oral history is, how (and how not) to conduct an oral history interview, the necessary equipment, and the different methods of sharing oral histories. Whether you’re planning to interview a family...

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    Origins of the Green Revolution: Hybrid Seeds, Hunger, and Mexico-India Cooperation

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University

    As a devastating famine gripped India and Pakistan in 1966, a cargo of hybrid wheat seeds from Mexico arrived one fateful day on India’s coast. The seeds were first planted across the Punjab region using new...

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    The Media, The White House, and Health Care

    Location: 

    Livestream Access

    Join us for the next “Voices in Leadership” event of the fall semester, featuring Joanne Kenen, Executive Editor, Health Care at Politico and Margaret Talev, Senior White House Correspondent for Bloomberg. Ms. Kenen has is a veteran Washington reporter who has covered all aspects of health policy and politics. At POLITICO since 2011, she’s expanded the health policy reporting team, led public policy forums and recently helped design a year-long multimedia magazine series on public health and the changing demographics of 21st century America. Ms. Talev is a Fall 2018...

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    Photographing Tutankhamun: How the Camera Helped Create “King Tut”

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Christina Riggs, Professor of the History of Art and Archaeology, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

    When Howard Carter found the sealed entrance to Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, he secured the services of archaeological photographer Harry Burton to document the site. Over the course of ten years, Burton produced more than 3,000 glass negatives of the tomb, its contents, and the many people—including Egyptian men, women, and children—who participated in the excavation. Christina Riggs will discuss how Burton’s photography helped create “King Tut” at a...

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    Schlesinger 75th Anniversary Celebration

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA

    In this performance and discussion, “The Suffragists” captures the power and passion of American women’s fight for the vote through song. Created by the acclaimed singer-songwriter Shaina Taub, the musical tells the story of the last decade of the struggle through the rivalry between Carrie Chapman Catt and Alice Paul. Taub’s musical gives voice to these women in ways that powerfully resonate in today’s political landscape. The performance will be followed by a multidisciplinary panel discussion.

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    The First 25 Years: How the Arboretum Became the Arboretum

    Location: 

    Centre Street Gate, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    The Arnold Arboretum did not come into existence full-formed, but had a long adolescence before it (literally) blossomed at 50. Our first director, Charles Sargent, prepared a 50-year report in 1922, before the end of his own 54-year tenure. But, what about the first 25 years? We don't have a 25-year report, however, we do have photos and the engaging stories from that time.

    Join our docent to hear those stories, as she takes you on a timeline...

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    Peters Hill: The Other End of the Arboretum

    Location: 

    Peters Hill Gate, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    Join our docent for a tour of the other end of the Arnold Arboretum, the southern end. Peters Hill became part of the Arboretum in 1894 and continues to charm with its special character, collections, and history. In autumn, the amazing view from the summit takes on a new tapestry of color, spreading out in the landscape below you. Learn the history of the land, along with information on the woody plants located here, like the collection of crabapples fruiting in many colors on the northern slope.

    Free but registration requested.

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    Archaeology Live: Harvard College Life in Colonial Times

    Location: 

    Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA

    Peer into an active archaeological excavation and learn about the oldest section of North America’s first college, founded in 1636. Harvard archaeology students will answer your questions, demonstrate archaeological methods, and display recent finds from the seventeenth century that reflect how Harvard College students—centuries ago—ate, dressed, and amused themselves, among other experiences. Drop by any time during this 90-minute event. The site is in Harvard Yard, steps away...

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