Events

    The Climate of Relationships and Intersectionality

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    This conversation is part of the series "Weather Reports: The Climate of Now." The featured speakers are climate activist Morgan Curtis, MDiv '24, and brontë velez, Black-latinx transdisciplinary artist.

    Morgan Curtis and brontë velez will discuss the intersectionality of race, class, gender, and climate collapse, and how seeing the world whole through the lens of relationships creates communities of care rather than conflict. They will consider what reparations might look like on behalf...

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    Spiro Pollalis, “Sustainability and Climate Change: From Science to Design”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    The upcoming national investment in infrastructure is most welcomed; it will add jobs and stimulate the economy. However, it is imperative for the infrastructure to be sustainable, resilient, and mitigate climate change. How can that be ensured?

    Since its founding in 2008, the research at the Zofnass Program has focused on providing tools for designers and planners to measure the sustainability and resilience of infrastructure. Recently, the focus is on expanding the tools for mitigating climate change. Today, the outcome of the Zofnass Program empowers both sides: the design...

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    Saving Seahorses to Save Seas

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Amanda Vincent, the 2021 Indianapolis Prize winner, has dedicated her career to understanding and advocating for seahorses, which serve as a flagship species for a wide range of marine conservation issues. She is credited with bringing the world’s attention to the 44 known species of seahorses and with developing a collaborative approach to marine conservation that is also improving the status of many other marine fishes, such as sharks, rays, groupers, and eels. Hear how her determination and optimism is saving not only these iconic sea creatures but also our world’s oceans.

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    Design Impact – Following the Sun: Design Futures at the Intersection of Health, Equity, & Climate Change

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Design Impact – Following the Sun: Design Futures at the Intersection of Health, Equity and Climate Change is a global virtual summit sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Design Alumni Council. Launching Thursday, September 23, the summit brings together an outstanding roster of global leaders to share their work and vision at the intersection of health, climate change and equity. This inspiring, two-day virtual summit transcends regional and national boundaries to unite our global community of practice, challenging us to use design as a tool for actionable,...

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    World Bicycle Day Celebration

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Human-powered transportation helps protect the natural world that we so proudly share with museum visitors. It can also contribute to health and wellness by offering a fun way to get moving. Dedicated to cyclists of all ages, this program will inspire you to seek out warm-weather adventures on two wheels, learn more about biking’s many benefits, get maintenance and safety tips, discover nearby bike routes, find out what’s being done to improve urban biking infrastructure, and enjoy music made with and on bicycles!

    ...

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    Wild Collection and Propagation of Rare and Endangered Plants

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    In Massachusetts alone, plants make up more than half of the total native species that are officially considered Endangered, Threatened, and Rare. In this talk, we will focus on how ex-situ plant conservation, coordinated plant collection efforts, and plant propagation play vital roles in preserving biodiversity and slowing the deleterious effects of climate change.

    We will discuss how collection trips are planned—and how citizen science now plays a role in these efforts—while providing a behind-the-scenes look at the planning process. A large focus will be plant propagation...

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    Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Thea Riofrancos’s current project, “Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition,” explores the politics of the transition to renewable energy through the lens of one of its key technologies: lithium batteries. Based on multisited fieldwork following lithium’s global supply chains from the point of extraction in the Chilean desert, “Brine to Batteries” will be the first scholarly account of the rapidly moving processes shaping the contours of the next energy system—and those of our planetary future.

    ...

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    Food Literacy Project Speaker Series: Cool Food with Gerard Pozzi

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    Make a difference by eating plant-rich food. Did you know Harvard recently signed the Cool Food Pledge? Learn more about the Cool Food Pledge with speaker, Gerard Pozzi, as he breaks down the impacts of a plant-based diet.

    A quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions come from food production. By simply changing what we eat, we can make a difference to our climate. Cool Food (coolfood.org) helps people and organizations reduce the climate impact of their food through shifting towards more plant-rich diets. Climate action has never been so delicious.

    Cool Food is an...

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    Kiley Fellow Lecture: Seth Denizen, "Thinking Through Soil: Case Study from the Mezquital Valley"

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Graduate School of Design

    Almost 200,000 acres of land in the fertile Mezquital Valley are irrigated with the untreated sewage of Mexico City. Every drop of rain, urban runoff, industrial effluent, and sewage in Mexico City is sent to the Mezquital Valley through a 60 kilometer pipe. Soils in this valley have been continuously irrigated with urban wastewater since 1901, longer than any other soil in the world. The capacity of these soils to produce conditions in which agriculture can be practiced safely and produce healthy crops depends on a complex negotiation between soil...

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    Linda Shi, "Green Infrastructure Beyond Flood Risk Reduction"

    Location: 

    Online Event, Graduate School of Design

    This lecture explores whether it is possible to achieve both social justice and environmental sustainability in efforts to mitigate urban flood risk. The expanding scale of urban flooding under climate change has renewed interest in large-scale restoration projects that make room for water in metro centers. However, ecologically functioning green infrastructure – unleashed rivers, sprawling wetlands – is inconsistent with the current governance landscape of fragmented local governments seeking to maximize local land values and minimize affordable housing. Moreover, even...

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    Civilizing the Internet of Things

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge,

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deeply interconnected ecosystem of billions of devices and systems that are transforming commerce, science, and society. IoT technologies can be used to disrupt, exploit, bias, bully, and intrude as well as to make our lives safer, more efficient, and more convenient. Join Francine Berman, Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in an exploration of the larger social and environmental ecosystem needed to develop an IoT that maximizes benefits, minimizes risk, and promotes individual protections...

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    Aging in [a] Place: Planning, Design & Spatial Justice in Aging Societies

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Stubbins, Room 112, 48 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Today, public discussion and policy focuses on “aging in place” as a way to improve quality of life and reduce costs. However, in part because of socioeconomic differences and structural inequalities, not all older adults can live in or move to age-supportive communities, neighborhoods, or homes that match their values and needs. Differences in access to places to age well can take the form of spatial inequalities, such as inadequate market rate housing for older adults on fixed incomes.

    'Co-sponsored by the Harvard Joint Center for...

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    Creative Climate Commitment with Susan Israel

    Location: 

    Hunnewell Building, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston

    In this workshop, participants will work in groups to creatively respond to climate change with discussion and prompting from Susan Israel, architect, artist, climate communicator, and social entrepreneur. Their efforts will result in a collaborative commitment to change, a talisman of sorts, represented in three dimensions.

    Cost: $30 for members; $40 for nonmembers; $20 for students.

    ...

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    Daniel Urban Kiley Lecture: Dilip Da Cunha, “The Invention of Rivers”

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

    Separating land and water is not just an act of division; it is also an act of creation. It creates land and water from ubiquitous wetness, defining them on either side of a line. It is one of the first acts of design, setting out a ground of habitation with a line that has largely been naturalized in features such as the coastline, the riverbank, and the water’s edge. These features are subjected to artistic representations, scientific inquiry, infrastructural engineering, and landscape design with little awareness of the act that brought them...

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    Winter Birding!

    Location: 

    Arborway Gate, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    Start your new year off on an easy 90-minute walk from the Arboretum's main Arborway Gate to the ponds and back. Our docent and experienced birder, Bob Mayer, will focus on winter birds, as well as admiring the woody plant collection in winter. Beginners, as well as more experienced birders, are welcome on the tour. Bring binoculars if you have them; some binoculars will be available to share. See the Arnold Arboretum's website for ...

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    Growing Woody Plants from Hardwood Cuttings

    Location: 

    Dana Greenhouse Classroom, 1050 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    Join Manager of Plant Production Tiffany Enzenbacher to learn how to propagate woody plants from fall cuttings. Students will collect and stick cuttings of several taxa (Ilex and Pieris to name a few), and will take their propagules home. After rooting, small plants may be ready to transplant as early as next year. Post-class nurturing will be required. Fee for all...

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    Origins of the Green Revolution: Hybrid Seeds, Hunger, and Mexico-India Cooperation

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA

    Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University

    As a devastating famine gripped India and Pakistan in 1966, a cargo of hybrid wheat seeds from Mexico arrived one fateful day on India’s coast. The seeds were first planted across the Punjab region using new...

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