Events

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Lecture

    Location: 

    Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The inaugural Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Lecture at Harvard recognizes an individual who, through their activism, advocacy, scholarship, or service, has made an indelible contribution to advancing justice and equality.

    The 2022 lecture honors civil rights and education leader Freeman A. Hrabowski III, PhD, who will deliver a keynote speech on October 12.

    Widely acclaimed as one of the most transformative leaders in higher education, Dr. Hrabowski’s 30-year tenure as president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) received national...

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    (In)Visible Agency: Ukrainian Women’s Experiences of the Russian War on Ukraine

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    The myriad effects of Russia’s war on Ukrainian women and the women’s movement. Participation has ranged from military service to humanitarian and volunteering initiatives, including extraordinary actions by many women and girls. How have Ukrainian feminists and the transnational women’s movement responded? What was the effect of feminist anti-war manifestoes? As the war continues, how has its impact on women evolved?

    ...

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    Prejudice and Power: Stratification Economics, a General Theory of Intergroup Inequality

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    William Darity Jr. is the 2022–2023 Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and professor of public policy, African and African American studies, and economics at Duke University. In this lecture, Darity will explore the theoretical framework of stratification economics—a comparatively new subspecialty in the wider field of economics that seeks to explain intergroup inequality—along with its implications for the analysis of immigration, macroeconomic analysis, wealth disparities, educational inequalities, and discrimination.

    ...

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    Abolition, Activism, and the University: Practitioner Perspectives on Transformative Justice in Boston

    Location: 

    Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard—Online

    Grassroots organizers in Greater Boston are at the forefront of ongoing statewide movements for a world without predatory policing and mass human caging. Join us for a virtual panel discussion with Transformative Justice...

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    Spring 2022 George Parker Winship Lecture: "Documenting Indigenous Nations, War, and Peace"

    Location: 

    Houghton Library, Quincy St. & Harvard St., Cambridge

    The Spring 2022 George Parker Winship Lecture at Houghton Library will be given by Scholars at Risk and Harvard Library Fellow Binalakshmi Nepram. In 1949, Manipur—a southeast Asian nation state with a 2,000-year history—was forcibly “merged” with India. Still under martial law today, the history and culture of its Indigenous inhabitants have been suppressed through decades of state-sanctioned violence. In her lecture, "Documenting Indigenous Nations, War, and Peace: Discovering and Preserving the Stories, Struggles, and History of Manipur, Northeast India," Nepram will discuss efforts...

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    Book Talk: Civic Education in the Age of Mass Migration

    Location: 

    Immigration Initiative at Harvard—Online

    Dr. Angela M. Banks will discuss her recent book Civic Education in the Age of Mass Migration: Implications for Theory and Practice.

    Angela M. Banks is a legal scholar specializing in membership and belonging in democratic societies. She is the Charles J. Merriam Distinguished Professor of law at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is the author of...

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    Shrinking Civic Space in Africa: Lessons from Uganda

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy—Online

    In this talk, Nicholas Opiyo—Carr Center Fellow, Scholar at Risk, and Human Rights Lawyer in Uganda—will analyze and explore the state arguments that have been made for limitations on the civic space in Africa. Throughout the discussion, he will trace relevant trends and examine the role of the international community in Africa’s political spheres. Noting that there are possible ways to push back against the shrinking of civic space, Opiyo will suggest new ways for civil society to organize effectively.

    ...

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    Great Zimbabwe: Reclaiming a 'Confiscated' Past

    Location: 

    Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard—Online

    This lecture is part of the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Alumni Fellows Virtual Reading Series.

     

    Shadreck Chirikure, Professor of Archaeology, University of Cape Town and British Academy Global Professor, School of Archaeology, Oxford University in conversation with Chakanetsa Mavhunga, Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, MIT.

    ...

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    Education Now: Navigating Tensions Over Teaching Race and Racism

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    How can schools, educators, and families navigate the continued politicization and tensions around teaching and talking about race, racism, diversity, and equity? As laws banning critical race theory are passed, and the rhetoric grows intense, we'll discuss what educators and families can do to make sure students are supported, learning, and prepared with the knowledge they need to understand their own histories and the diverse and global society they’ll enter.

    ...

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    Patricia Sullivan, 'Justice Rising: Robert Kennedy’s America in Black and White'

    Location: 

    Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard—Online

    Former Hutchins Center Fellows discuss their recent works in. the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Alumni Fellows Virtual Reading Series.

    Patricia Sullivan, Professor of History, University of South Carolina, in conversation with Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School.

    Learn more and register for this virtual event.

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    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 3)

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    The new genre of interior painting enjoyed great popularity among 17th-century Dutch citizens. Its indoor scenes featuring people involved in mundane activities resemble the domestic settings in which they were hung. Other art forms such as perspective boxes and dollhouses further reinforce the link connecting physical, pictorial, and mental space by relating home to the interiority of the individual.

    ...

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    Reconstructing Queen Amanishakheto’s Musical Instruments

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Double reed pipes, known as auloi, were popular musical instruments in the ancient Mediterranean. In 1921, archaeologists exploring the necropolis of Meroë (northern Sudan)—as part of the Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition—found a large collection of auloi in the pyramid of Nubian Queen Amanishakheto. Susanne Gänsicke will discuss the discovery’s importance and what it reveals about the connections between Nubia and the Mediterranean world as well as the significance of far-reaching musical traditions. She will also share recent efforts to conserve...

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    Useful Objects: Nineteenth-Century Museums and American Culture

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    What can the history of museums tell us about their role in American culture today? What kinds of objects were considered worth collecting, and who decided their value? Join Reed Gochberg, author of Useful Objects: Museums, Science, and Literature in Nineteenth-Century America (Oxford University Press, September 2021) to learn about the early history of American museums, including Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology. In conversation with HMSC...

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    Indian Collectibles: Appropriations and Resistance in the Haudenosaunee Homelands

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Scott Manning Stevens is an associate professor and director of Native American and Indigenous Studies at Syracuse University. In this lecture, he will discuss his new project, which focuses on ways Indigenous communities can confront cultural alienation and appropriation in museums, galleries, and archives.

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    Black Women and the American University: Eileen Southern's Story

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Join us for a one-hour webinar exploring the legacy of Eileen Southern, author of The Music of Black Americans: A History and founder and editor of The Black Perspective in Music. In 1976, Eileen Southern became the first African American woman tenured in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). Southern played an important institutional role at Harvard. She was central in developing the Department of Afro-American Studies (now African and African American Studies), serving as an early chair, and was on the faculty of the Department of Music, where she taught...

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    Black Women and the American University: Eileen Southern’s Story

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Join us for a one-hour webinar exploring the legacy of Eileen Southern, author of “The Music of Black Americans: A History” and founder and editor of “The Black Perspective in Music.”

    In 1976, Eileen Southern (1920–2002) became the first African American woman tenured in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). She was central in developing...

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    Harvard Dance Center Showing: Initiation – In Love Solidarity

    Location: 

    Harvard Dance Center—Online or in-person

    Initiation – In Love Solidarity is a choreographic narrative exploring the embodiment of the Middle Passage, and the resilience and evolving identities of women in the African diaspora. A film component of the work was created at historic sites in New England related to the transatlantic slave trade and emancipation. The imagery of the cowrie shell is present throughout, chosen as an emblem of the transformative identity of the Black female body.

    Saturday, November 13, 4pm & 7pm: ...

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    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 2)

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Arts and sciences flourished in the Dutch Republic during the 17th century. Women such as Anna Maria van Schurman, Margareta van Godewick, and Anna Roemer Visscher excelled in scholarly pursuits and art practice. They were greatly admired, but they were nonetheless categorized as exceptional cases and never possessed the freedom to voice ideas enjoyed by their male counterparts. Working in a variety of art forms, including miniature painting, drawing, embroidery, and paper cutting, these women often meant to address no other audience than the artist herself.

    ...

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    Gutman Library Book Talk: 100 Days in Vietnam: A Memoir of Love, War, and Survival

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Painstakingly recreated from wartime letters and remembrances and contextualized by contemporary news accounts, 100 Days in Vietnam is a collaboration between Joe and his son Matthew A. Tallon, Ed.M.'09, Administrative Director of Faculty Support Services at HGSE, also an Army veteran.

    Here we experience the war through the emotions of the man who survived it: the drudgery and monotony of airfield life, the heartache of a newlywed missing his wife, the terror of combat missions, the agony of injury and rehabilitation, and the bittersweet relief from the completion of...

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