Events

    On the Move: 17th-Century Dutch Artists and Their Travels

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Living through the COVID-19 pandemic over the past two years has prompted renewed appreciation of the excitement and pleasures, as well as the challenges and dangers, of travel. In this lecture, we’ll learn about the experiences 17th-century Dutch draftsmen had to face as they journeyed from their studios to places near and far. Jane Shoaf Turner will focus on drawings by artists who traveled beyond the Dutch Republic’s borders—across the Channel to England, north and east to Germany and Scandinavia, south to France, over the Alps to Italy, and across the Atlantic to Brazil.

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    The Quest to Image Black Holes

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    Join the CfA live from the Smithsonian Castle in Washington, DC to learn about exciting new results from the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), the team that brought us the first-ever image of a black hole!

    Moderated by Smithsonian Under Secretary for Science and Research and former Chief Scientist at NASA, Dr. Ellen Stofan, this event will be live streamed and is open to the public. Panelists will include Shep Doeleman, founding director of the EHT; Kari Haworth chief technology officer of the CfA; and astrophysicists Angelo Ricarte and Paul Tiede.

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    The Social Costs of Pretrial Detention

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Sandra Susan Smith is a Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and the Daniel & Florence Guggenheim Professor of Criminal Justice at Harvard Kennedy School, where she also directs the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management. An expert on urban poverty, race and ethnicity, and social capital and social networks, Smith’s most recent work has focused on criminal case processing, especially the consequences of pretrial detention and diversion.

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    Charismatic Robots in Everyday Human Spaces

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Heather Knight will present work from the Collaborative Humans and Robotics: Interaction, Sociability, Machine learning and Art (CHARISMA) robotics lab at Oregon State University (OSU). The pandemic has brought increasing automation into everyday human spaces, making ever more relevant CHARISMA’s work in service robots, expressive communication, and autonomous and human-in-the-loop robot behavior systems.

    Using examples from 20 years in the field, this talk illustrates...

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    Gallery Talk: Anna Atkins’s Botanical Cyanotypes—Camera-less Photography and Scientific Discovery in the 19th Century

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    This talk will highlight the work and artistic process of Anna Atkins (1799–1871), creator of the first photographically illustrated book. It will also explore the importance of Atkins's photograms to scientific research and documentation in the 19th century.

     

    This talk is offered in conjunction with the exhibition White Shadows: Anneliese Hager and the Camera-less Photograph, on view at the Harvard Art Museums through July 31,...

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    Harvard Science Book Talk: "Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain Is Built"

    Location: 

    Harvard Division of Science, Harvard Library, and Harvard Book Store—Online

    By the time a baby is born, its brain is equipped with billions of intricately crafted neurons wired together through trillions of interconnections to form a compact and breathtakingly efficient supercomputer. "Zero to Birth" takes you on an extraordinary journey to the very edge of creation, from the moment of an egg’s fertilization through each step of a human brain’s development in the womb―and even a little beyond.

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    Abolition, Activism, and the University: Practitioner Perspectives on Transformative Justice in Boston

    Location: 

    Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard—Online

    Grassroots organizers in Greater Boston are at the forefront of ongoing statewide movements for a world without predatory policing and mass human caging. Join us for a virtual panel discussion with Transformative Justice...

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    Planning for an Equitable Recovery: Using COVID Funding to Lift Learning and Support Every Student

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    New research from Professor Thomas Kane of the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is bringing the impact of the pandemic into stark relief — and adding fuel to the call for comprehensive, equitable, and effective solutions. Kane’s work — part of an ongoing collaboration with NWEA and AIR — reveals the consequences of remote and hybrid learning for student achievement in high- and low-income schools, using data from 10,000 schools in 49 states plus the District of Columbia.

    Join us as we explore the findings and outline state and district strategies to help students...

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    Colliding Worlds: How Cosmic Encounters Shaped Planets and Life

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Signs of ancient collisions are widespread in the solar system, from the barren, once-habitable Mars to rugged asteroids. In this talk, physicist Simone Marchi, discussing his recent book, Colliding Worlds (Oxford University Press, 2021), will explore the key role that collisions in space have played in the formation and evolution of our solar system, the development of planets, and possibly even the origin of life on Earth. Analyzing our current understanding of the surfaces of Mars, the Moon, and asteroids—drawn from recent space missions—Marchi will present the dramatic...

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    In-Person Gallery Talk: Ella Hurd’s Botanical Cyanotypes—Camera-less Photography and Scientific Discovery in the 19th Century

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The talk will highlight amateur botanist Ella Hurd and the process she used to make her cyanotypes. It will also explore the importance of camera-less photography to scientific research and documentation in the 19th century.

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    The Descendants (A Novel)

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Ladee Hubbard is a writer whose most recent novel is “The Rib King” (Amistad, 2021). In this lecture, she will discuss her current project, a novel that examines the implications of the ways in which Black people in the United States have historically been represented as an internal threat to both public health and safety, placing the 1980s War on Drugs in dialogue with the larger history of African Americans being used in drug trials and medical experiments.

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    John Portman Lecture: Bruther // Stéphanie Bru et Alexandre Thériot

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Stéphanie Bru and Alexandre Theriot founded Bruther in Paris in 2007. They belong to the generation of architects who started their careers at the beginning of the recession, a condition likely to be reflected in the way they define architecture: as a Swiss Army knife, a tool to be used in the most disparate circumstances, an aid that reconciles all fields of knowledge.

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    The Power of Antiquity in the Making of Modern Egypt

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Ancient Egypt conjures images of pharaonic temples, tombs, and pyramids, and perhaps, even the familiar illustrations from children’s books and magazines showing kilted workers on the Nile toiling away on their kings’ great monuments. But what is the relationship between these images—along with the deep history they evoke and the processes of discovery that made them visible—and the history of modern Egypt?

    In this talk, Wendy Doyon will discuss the relationship between state, archaeology, and labor in Mehmed (or Muhammad) Ali’s Egypt—an autonomous khedival, or viceregal,...

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    In-Person Gallery Talk: Washington and the Power of Clothes

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Join curator Horace D. Ballard for fresh perspective on two of the museums’ iconic portraits of George Washington through the meaning of gesture and the materialities of fashion. Inspired by Ballard’s recent research on Washington and his rewriting of the portraits’ gallery labels, the talk will explore the important role artists played in shaping the nation’s sense of self after the partisan politics of the Revolutionary War.

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    Mexican Red: The Perfect Color that Changed the World

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) is a small insect that produces a brilliant red pigment. Found in textiles, paintings, cosmetics, and many other objects that span the globe, cochineal is an integral part of world history. Cochineal pigment was used by Mesoamerican peoples long before the Spanish arrived in the sixteenth century. After being introduced to Europe, it quickly became a precious commodity and control over its global trade was a source of conflict and competition for over three centuries. In this lecture, Gabriela Soto Laveaga will trace the fascinating history of cochineal...

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    Making Race: Policy, Sex, and Social Order in the French Atlantic and Indian Oceans, 1608–1756

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Mélanie Lamotte is an assistant professor of French at Tulane University. After completing her first book, under contract with Harvard University Press, she is undertaking a research project that examines the material life of the enslaved across the early modern French empire, thereby reconstructing the cultural, social, economic, and political experiences of slave communities. Join her to learn more about her work.

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    The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Children's Mental Health

    Location: 

    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health—Online

    Public health responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have affected the daily lives of many of us, including children. The next Population Mental Health Forum will focus on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and resultant public health restrictions on children’s mental health. Dr. Karestan Koenen will be joined by Dr. Tamsin Ford from the University of Cambridge who will discuss recent research findings related to children’s mental health during this time. The event will conclude with a Q&A session with attendees.

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    Art Talk Live: Yasuo Kuniyoshi’s Last Act

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Yasuo Kuniyoshi once proclaimed that “an artist’s drawings are his first words.” Having emigrated from Japan to the United States at the age of 16, Kuniyoshi relied upon drawing as his most expressive medium. Through drawing, he translated the anxiety, disillusionment, and alienation faced by Japanese émigrés in the aftermath of World War II into a uniquely personal and dynamic American modernist style.

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    Gutman Library Book Talk - Trauma-Responsive Schooling: Centering Student Voice and Healing

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Trauma-Responsive Schooling outlines a novel approach to transforming American schools through student-centered, trauma-informed practices. The book chronicles the use of an innovative educational model, Trauma-Responsive Equitable Education (TREE), as part of a multiyear research project in two elementary schools in rural Maine. In this model, Lyn Mikel Brown,Ed.D.'89, Catharine Biddle, and Mark Tappan, Ed.D.'87, endorse whole-school change, encouraging educators to upend traditional classroom power dynamics by listening foremost to student voices, validating student...

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