Events

    A Pale Blue Dot under Pressure: Climate Change, Justice, and Resilience in Our Rapidly Warming World

    Location: 

    Online or at Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    Climate change is one of the, if not the, most significant threats facing our planet today. It affects life on Earth in countless known, and many still unknown, ways—from atmospheric health to wellness; natural ecosystems to small businesses; global security to neighborhood food insecurity; and international policy to individual decision-making—while exacerbating underlying patterns of inequality.

    This conference will explore these interconnected issues through sessions investigating global climate systems and climate disasters, public policy, health, climate justice and...

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    William Belden Noble Lecture Series: John Green

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School, Memorial Church, 1 Harvard Yard, Cambridge

    New York Times bestselling Author John Green will be the first speaker in the 2022-23 William Belden Noble Lectures. Green is author of "The Fault in Our Stars," "Turtles All the Way Down," and "The Anthropocene Reviewed," among others. He is also widely-known video blogger, podcaster, and philanthropist. The title of his lecture is "How the World Ends."

    The lecture is the first of four this academic year. The four-part series will take a plunge into the moral and ethical questions surrounding the global climate crisis and the role of religious institutions, organization and...

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    National Fossil Day: More Than Dinosaurs!

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Paleontology is about more than dinosaurs! Harvard paleontologists study amazing non-dinosaur fossils including early mammals, ancient invertebrates, whales, crabs, and more! Meet members of the Stephanie E. Pierce Lab for Vertebrate Paleontology and the Ortega-Hernández Lab for Invertebrate Paleontology to see their favorite fossils, learn about their research, and ask them your questions. See what new techniques and technologies are being used to study fossils, learn what fossils can teach us about evolution, and hear about current research projects. Join us to celebrate National...

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    Loeb Fellowship 50th Anniversary Symposium: Keynote by Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium (48 Quincy St., Cambridge)

    Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson is a marine biologist, policy expert, writer, and Brooklyn native. She is co-founder of Urban Ocean Lab, a think tank for the future of coastal cities. She co-edited the bestselling climate anthology All We Can Save, co-founded The All We Can Save Project, and co-created the Spotify/Gimlet climate solutions podcast...

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    Harvard Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series

    Location: 

    Science Center Hall C, 1 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Harvard Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series returns this 2022. New presenters this year include Arielle Johnson, Ph.D. (Flavor Scientist, Co-founder of the Noma Fermentation Lab), Chintan Pandya (Chef and Partner of Unapologetic Foods), Fatmata Binta (Chef of “Dine on a Mat” and Founder of Fulani Kitchen Projects), Kate Strangfeld (Founder of Bite Scized Education), Sean Sherman (Founder of The Sioux Chef) or Eduard Xatrutch (Chef at Disfrutar and Compartir), Pia Leon (Chef and Co-owner of Kjolle, Central, Mayo, MIL, Ichu) and Malena Martinez (Co-Director of Mater Iniciativa,...

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    Why Sharks Matter: Shark Science and Conservation

    Location: 

    Virtual and In-Person – Harvard Museums of Science & Culture, Haller Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    Sharks are some of the most fascinating, most ecologically important, most threatened, and most misunderstood animals on Earth. Join award-winning marine conservation biologist Dr. David Shiffman, author of the new book Why Sharks Matter: A Deep Dive with the World's Most Misunderstood Predator, for a conversation about what's new and what's next in the world of shark science and conservation.

    Presented by the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture and the Harvard Museum of Natural History

    ...

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    Next in Climate Change: The Ethel and David Jackson Next in Science Program

    Location: 

    Online or at Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The speakers in “Next in Climate Change” will discuss emerging scientific research and multi-dimensional implications of climate change for people, society, and our planet. The program will focus on five critical areas of inquiry and the connections among them: extreme weather and its impacts on communities, infrastructure, and the environment; economic effects of climate change, as well as economic opportunities; consequences of climate change on global health, ranging from cancer to pandemics; impacts on particularly vulnerable populations; and approaches to mitigation for the...

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    Science and Cooking Lecture Series 2021

    Location: 

    Harvard Science Center, Hall C, 1 Oxford St., Cambridge

    This year’s Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series celebrates culinary techniques to unlock flavors, ranging from Noma’s edge-cutting fermentation to Bryan Furman’s BBQ to Amanda Cohen’s way of making plant-based charcuterie.

    The 2021 series marks the return to the in-person format and brings to Harvard’s Science Center chefs, Harvard professors, and Science and Cooking enthusiasts. All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C). Masks are required, hand sanitizer will be available, and physically distanced seating is...

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    Who Discovered Evolution?

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Charles Darwin is commonly cited as the person who “discovered” evolution. But, the historical record shows that roughly seventy different individuals published work on the topic of evolution between 1748 and 1859, the year that Darwin published On the Origin of Species. These early thinkers, now almost entirely forgotten, included biologists, geologists, horticulturists, physicians, clergymen, atheists, philosophers, teachers, and poets.

    William Friedman will discuss the ideas of these pre-Darwinian evolutionists, place Darwin in a broader historical context, and...

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    The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the tenth and eleventh centuries. The causes continue to be investigated and debated. Paleoenvironmental research over the past twenty years has revealed that the demise coincided with a prolonged, intensive drought that extended across the region, providing compelling evidence that climate change played a key role in the collapse of the Maya. Billie Turner will examine this evidence and the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

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    Olfaction in Science and Society

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    The sense of smell plays a critical role in human behavior, from warning us of potential dangers to attracting us to certain foods, places, and people. Harvard scientists Catherine Dulac and Venkatesh Murthy study the molecules, cells, and brain circuits that underlie olfaction and the social behaviors that aromas can elicit. In this program, they will engage in a conversation with internationally recognized olfactive expert Dawn Goldworm to discuss how neurobiological research on olfaction relates to our everyday experiences.

    ...

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    Infectious Cancers in Tasmanian Devils

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The Tasmanian devil is the world’s largest living carnivorous marsupial. This species was once abundant in Australia, but today is only found on the island of Tasmania, where it is at risk of extinction due to two rare, contagious cancers. Mark Margres will discuss how this species is adapting in response to these diseases, whether there is any hope for the Tasmanian devil to avoid extinction, and what can be learned about human cancers from studying the disease in other animal species.

    ...

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    What Makes Chocolate "Good?"

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The social and environmental values underlying artisanal chocolate production have become increasingly important in its marketing. Good taste is paramount, of course, but how does one measure "social goodness," and what additional value does it add for the consumer? Chocolate makers’ interests often diverge from those of cacao producers, and industry stakeholders have not clearly addressed these concerns. Carla Martin will examine the cacao-chocolate industry and highlight the often conflicting goals that can create gaps in social and environmental responsibility.

    A...

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    Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    From Botox to bionic limbs, the human body is more upgradable than ever. But how much can we alter and still be human? The award-winning documentary Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement explores the social impact of human biotechnologies. Fixed rethinks “disability” and “normalcy” by exploring technologies that promise to change our bodies and minds forever. Join us for a discussion about the ethics of gene editing and disability.

    ...

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    I Heart Science

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Awaken your love of science with activities led by Harvard scientists, graduate students, and enthusiastic explorers. Meet scientists who investigate fossils, microbes, and carnivorous plants. Hear short talks on current research at Harvard. Explore fermenting microbes in action as they perform in a musical art installation! Bring your own collections to show to local shell and minerals clubs. This program has something for everyone and is appropriate for children and adults of all ages.

    Note: Regular museum admission rates apply.

    ...

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    Making Pig-to-Human Transplantation a Clinical Reality with CRISPR Genome Editing

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Xenotransplantation is a promising strategy to address the shortage of organs for human transplantation, though concerns about pig-to-human immunological compatibility and the risk of cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) have impeded the clinical application of this approach. In this lecture, Luhan Yang, cofounder and chief scientific officer of eGenesis will explain how CRISPR is being used to create pigs with advanced immunological modifications to address immunological and functional compatibility issues.

    This event is free and open to the...

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    Curbing Gun Violence: Strategies for Change

    Location: 

    Online webcast from The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    Nearly 40,000 people died from gun-related injuries in the U.S. in 2017 -- the most in 20 years. And while mass shootings grab headlines, they account for a small part of gun-related murders in the country. Urban gun violence remains a tremendous --  and too often overlooked -- burden on underserved communities. And suicides persist as accounting for the majority of U.S. gun deaths. As the seventh anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting approaches, this Forum event will examine contrasting facets of gun violence in America. Seeking to move the discussion past...

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    Civilizing the Internet of Things

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge,

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deeply interconnected ecosystem of billions of devices and systems that are transforming commerce, science, and society. IoT technologies can be used to disrupt, exploit, bias, bully, and intrude as well as to make our lives safer, more efficient, and more convenient. Join Francine Berman, Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in an exploration of the larger social and environmental ecosystem needed to develop an IoT that maximizes benefits, minimizes risk, and promotes individual protections...

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    Recreational Marijuana and CBD: Public Attitudes, Science and the Law

    Location: 

    Online webcast from The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    In the last decade, Americans’ relationship with cannabis has transformed: today, dozens of states have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use and American farmers can grow hemp on an industrial scale. Meanwhile, shoppers can find cannabidiol (CBD), which is derived from cannabis but does not produce a “high” like marijuana, in everything from oils to vapes, chocolate bars, cosmetics—even dog treats. Some say CBD can relieve stress, pain, anxiety, and more, with no side effects. But the evidence for many of these claims is limited, and state and federal laws around the sale...

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