Events

    Martin Luther King & The Struggle for Voting Rights, Making Democracy Work

    Location: 

    Harvard Business School—Online

    Join us for a special session in which Professor David Moss, author of the acclaimed book “Democracy: A Case Study,” makes history come alive with an audience-driven discussion of Martin Luther King Jr. and the struggle for voting rights. Professor Moss will bring his wildly popular approach to teaching the history of American democracy to a new stage in this public forum hosted by Harvard Business School.

    So please bring your ideas, and leave your preconceptions at the door. It will be an afternoon that challenges the way you think about America’s history and civic life – and...

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    How We Incarcerate Young People: A Conversation about Policy and Neuroscience

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Across the United States, children under the age of 18 can be tried as adults in criminal court. Although the practice is condemned by international law, we are the only country in the world that sentences young people to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At the same time, recent developments in neuroscience research demonstrate that the human brain is not fully developed until after the age of 25.

    This program will consider the ways we punish young people in the American criminal legal system and how our policies could be reformed. We will bring together a...

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    Twenty Million Angry Men: A Conversation about the Importance of Including People with Felony Convictions in Our Jury System

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    In the United States, 8 percent of the adult population—and 33 percent of the Black adult male population—has a felony conviction. Even after people have served time in prison, they are systematically excluded from civic participation, including serving on juries. Offered in collaboration with the Institute to End Mass Incarceration at Harvard Law School, this program will explore questions of jury service, civic participation in the criminal legal system, and the importance of such participation by people with prior convictions.

    ...

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    Multilateral Cultural Diplomacy: A Conversation with UNESCO Director General Audrey Azoulay

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    In the third installment of the Future of Cultural Diplomacy Series, UNESCO’s Director-General Audrey Azoulay will offer her unique perspective on cultural diplomacy as the leader of one of the world’s largest multilateral agencies focused on education, scientific and cultural issues.

    In a conversation co-moderated by Ambassador Nicholas Burns and Carla Dirlikov Canales, Director-General Azoulay will discuss UNESCO’s current priorities, including education, culture, gender equality, and freedom of expression, and discuss how UNESCO has provided multilateral approaches to...

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    Radcliffe Day 2021

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    On Radcliffe Day 2021—Friday, May 28—Harvard Radcliffe Institute will award the Radcliffe Medal to Melinda Gates. 

    Expert panelists will then discuss achieving gender equity in the United States, each offering her own perspective informed by deep expertise and unique experience. The discussion will be moderated by the distinguished American historian and Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University Drew Gilpin Faust, who was founding dean of the Radcliffe Institute and the first woman to serve as president of Harvard.

    Following the panel...

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    The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy—Online

    May 31, 2021 marks the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, when a violent white mob nearly destroyed the formerly thriving and prosperous African American community in the Greenwood district of Tulsa (also known as Black Wall Street). Over 300 African Americans were killed, and thousands were displaced. Hundreds of homes and businesses burned to the ground. In the decades since this occurred, the massacre was covered up, local officials obstructed the redevelopment of Greenwood, and the local chapter of the KKK became one of the largest in the U.S.

    Join the Carr...

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    Negotiating with Vladimir Putin

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School, Program on Negotiation—Online

    Bruce Allyn applies insight from the fields of negotiation and mediation to define practical steps that both US and Russian sides can take today to realize both individual and shared interests in a relationship that has descended into bitter enmity. We will look at how to "zoom out" to big-picture strategy—realizing what is at stake—and how to "zoom in" to Vladimir Putin the negotiator: his formative years, his heroes, his psychology, his intentions and current aspirations.

    Allyn will examine practical steps to break the cycle of offense and revenge that has...

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    2021 May 21

    Sakharov Centenary Seminar: Sakharov, Nuclear Weapons, and Human Rights

    Repeats every 4 days until Fri May 21 2021 .
    12:30pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    May 21 marks the centenary of the birth of Andrei Sakharov, one of the great physicists of the twentieth century who was also one of the world’s most courageous and renowned proponents of freedom and human rights. His name nowadays is universally linked with the quest for human rights and democracy.

    As the key figure in the Soviet Union’s development of a thermonuclear bomb, Sakharov could have enjoyed a life of privilege and luxury. But to do so would have meant closing his eyes to the injustice and repression around him. This was something that Sakharov, unlike the vast...

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    Vaccine Equity and Efficacy in the United States and the World

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    As efforts to distribute COVID-19 vaccines intensify throughout the United States and across the globe, how can we ensure that equity and access are prioritized? This panel seeks to address the challenges and opportunities of equitable public health strategies around COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

    ...

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    Beyond Brown: Leading for Racial Equity in a Southern Context

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    The Southern Black community catalyzed the movement for free public schools for all children. This community also led the efforts to desegregate schools. Despite these efforts, the South remains home to some of the largest educational inequities within our nation. Yet, many discussions about educational equity are devoid of Southern representation. This is problematic considering that Southern states have higher rates of poverty and are home to one-third of all K-12 students, 56% of all Black students, and one-third of our nation’s ELL and migrant student populations.

    This...

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    Carmen Reinhart – Lessons from History for the COVID Economic Recovery

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    At a time when U.S. federal debt is at its highest level since World War II—and the post-COVID economic recovery around the world remains uncertain—join the Belfer Center’s Applied History Project for an open session of our Applied History Work Group. Its members—distinguished historians and public servants—study the past to illuminate the most pressing challenges we face today.

    For this session, the Applied History Working Group is delighted to welcome Carmen Reinhart, the Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group, for a discussion on economic...

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    Book Talk: Faith in Numbers: Religion, Sectarianism, and Democracy

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    A seminar with Michael Hoffman, assistant professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, on his new book Faith in Numbers: Religion, Sectarianism, and Democracy from Oxford University Press.

    Why does religion sometimes increase support for democracy and sometimes do just the opposite? Faith in Numbers presents a theory of religion, group interest, and democracy. Focusing on communal religion, it demonstrates that the effect of communal prayer on support for democracy depends on the interests of the religious group in question. For members of...

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    Medical Racism from 1619 to the Present: History Matters

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on communities of color in the United States. In addition, the uneven and unequal distribution of vaccines is raising the issue of mistrust and vaccine hesitancy in these same communities. Lack of trust in the US healthcare system among communities of color is inextricably linked to the history of systemic racism in this country. With fewer than half of Black American adults indicating that they will definitely or probably get vaccinated against COVID-19, understanding the roots of this hesitancy—which dates back centuries—is...

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    Education Now: Cultivating the Power of Resilience

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    As we emerge from the COVID-10 pandemic, many experts believe that the aftereffects of isolation, stress, fear, and sadness will linger. Trauma from mental health challenges of the past year will not quickly fade. Today, 18–25-year olds are suffering especially severely from the loneliness epidemic. While this loneliness epidemic preceded the onset of COVID-19, pandemic times have further heightened the isolation and mental and emotional duress experienced by many. Furthermore, a parallel and related epidemic of stress and anxiety in women and girls—from elementary school through college...

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    Gutman Library Book Talk: Fugitive Pedagogy: Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Join the Harvard Graduate School of Education for a conversation between author Jarvis Givens, Assistant Professor at HGSE and the Suzanne Young Murray Assistant Professor at the Radcliffe Institute, and Joshua Bennett, Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College.

    Black education was a subversive act from its inception. African Americans pursued education through clandestine means, often in defiance of law and custom, even under threat of violence. They developed what Jarvis Givens calls a tradition of “fugitive pedagogy”—a theory and practice...

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    Harvard Library Presents: Archival Stories of Indigenous and Asian Experiences at Harvard

    Location: 

    Harvard-Yenching Library & University Archives—Online

    Join us for a discussion on stories of navigating Harvard. Experts from the Harvard-Yenching Library and University Archives will share materials from Harvard's archival and library collections focused on Indigenous and Asian experiences throughout Harvard's past. The program will feature brief remarks from Martha Whitehead, Vice President for the Harvard Library and University...

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    Imagining Urban Futures / During, Despite, and Beyond the Pandemic

    Location: 

    Harvard University Center for African Studies—Online

    The event, moderated by Bruno Carvalho and Diane Davis, will bring together perspectives from different regions of the globe. AbdouMaliq Simone, Eric Klinenberg, and Hiba Bou Akar will present their views of the connections between the ongoing pandemic and urbanization. They will respond to questions from the moderators as well as attendees. Audience members will have a chance to present questions to the speakers during the event, and in advance at registration.

    ...

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    Bark: Get to Know Your Trees

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    Due to popular demand, we are offering another session of this free webinar. Led by naturalist and conservationist, Michael Wojtech, you'll learn to identify tree species by their bark and discover why such a variety of bark characteristics exist. Why do some species have smooth bark, while on others it is thick and broken? Why does bark peel? Join us to find out!

    Learn more about and RSVP for "Bark: Get...

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    Gutman Library Book Talk: The Education Trap: Schools and the Remaking of Inequality in Boston

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    For generations, Americans have looked to education as the solution to economic disadvantage. Yet, although more people are earning degrees, the gap between rich and poor is widening. Cristina Groeger delves into the history of this seeming contradiction, explaining how education came to be seen as a panacea even as it paved the way for deepening inequality.

    Learn more about and...

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    Resetting the Table: A Virtual Talk and Tour with the Curators

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    The "Resetting the Table: Food and Our Changing Tastes" exhibition at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology explores food choices and eating habits in the United States, including the sometimes hidden but always important ways in which our tables are shaped by cultural, historical, political, and technological influences.

    Join us on this special virtual talk and tour at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology with Joyce Chapli, guest curator and Harvard University James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History; Janis Sacco, Director...

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