Events

    2021 Sep 30

    Saving Seahorses to Save Seas

    6:00pm to 7:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    Amanda Vincent, the 2021 Indianapolis Prize winner, has dedicated her career to understanding and advocating for seahorses, which serve as a flagship species for a wide range of marine conservation issues. She is credited with bringing the world’s attention to the 44 known species of seahorses and with developing a collaborative approach to marine conservation that is also improving the status of many other marine fishes, such as sharks, rays, groupers, and eels. Hear how her determination and optimism is saving not only these iconic sea creatures but also our world’s oceans.

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    2021 Sep 23

    Design Impact – Following the Sun: Design Futures at the Intersection of Health, Equity, & Climate Change

    (All day)

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    Design Impact – Following the Sun: Design Futures at the Intersection of Health, Equity and Climate Change is a global virtual summit sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Design Alumni Council. Launching Thursday, September 23, the summit brings together an outstanding roster of global leaders to share their work and vision at the intersection of health, climate change and equity. This inspiring, two-day virtual summit transcends regional and national boundaries to unite our global community of practice, challenging us to use design as a tool for actionable,...

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    2021 Sep 28

    Farmers' Market at Harvard

    Repeats every week every Tuesday until Tue Oct 26 2021 except Tue Aug 24 2021.
    12:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Science Center Plaza, 1 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The Farmers' Market at Harvard is open for the season, operating on Tuesdays from 12:00pm–6:00pm on the Science Center Plaza! Join us every Tuesday through October 26 (no Market on August 24).

    Help support the vital local farmers and food artisans who ensure we have fresh, healthy and safe food! The Market will continue to accept SNAP with a weekly maximum SNAP Match of $15. Participating vendors also accept HIP, as well as WIC and Senior FMNP Coupons.

    ...

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    2021 Jun 06

    World Bicycle Day Celebration

    12:00pm to 1:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Human-powered transportation helps protect the natural world that we so proudly share with museum visitors. It can also contribute to health and wellness by offering a fun way to get moving. Dedicated to cyclists of all ages, this program will inspire you to seek out warm-weather adventures on two wheels, learn more about biking’s many benefits, get maintenance and safety tips, discover nearby bike routes, find out what’s being done to improve urban biking infrastructure, and enjoy music made with and on bicycles!

    ...

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    2021 May 20

    Wild Collection and Propagation of Rare and Endangered Plants

    10:30am

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    In Massachusetts alone, plants make up more than half of the total native species that are officially considered Endangered, Threatened, and Rare. In this talk, we will focus on how ex-situ plant conservation, coordinated plant collection efforts, and plant propagation play vital roles in preserving biodiversity and slowing the deleterious effects of climate change.

    We will discuss how collection trips are planned—and how citizen science now plays a role in these efforts—while providing a behind-the-scenes look at the planning process. A large focus will be plant propagation...

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    2021 May 03

    Imagining Urban Futures / During, Despite, and Beyond the Pandemic

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard University Center for African Studies—Online

    The event, moderated by Bruno Carvalho and Diane Davis, will bring together perspectives from different regions of the globe. AbdouMaliq Simone, Eric Klinenberg, and Hiba Bou Akar will present their views of the connections between the ongoing pandemic and urbanization. They will respond to questions from the moderators as well as attendees. Audience members will have a chance to present questions to the speakers during the event, and in advance at registration.

    ...

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    2021 Apr 14

    Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    Thea Riofrancos’s current project, “Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition,” explores the politics of the transition to renewable energy through the lens of one of its key technologies: lithium batteries. Based on multisited fieldwork following lithium’s global supply chains from the point of extraction in the Chilean desert, “Brine to Batteries” will be the first scholarly account of the rapidly moving processes shaping the contours of the next energy system—and those of our planetary future.

    ...

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    2021 Apr 07

    Food Literacy Project Speaker Series: Cool Food with Gerard Pozzi

    4:00pm to 4:45pm

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    Make a difference by eating plant-rich food. Did you know Harvard recently signed the Cool Food Pledge? Learn more about the Cool Food Pledge with speaker, Gerard Pozzi, as he breaks down the impacts of a plant-based diet.

    A quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions come from food production. By simply changing what we eat, we can make a difference to our climate. Cool Food (coolfood.org) helps people and organizations reduce the climate impact of their food through shifting towards more plant-rich diets. Climate action has never been so delicious.

    Cool Food is an...

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    2020 Oct 01

    Lecture: [Re]Constructing Real Estate: The Question of Value

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design—Online

    For this event with the Harvard Graduate School of Design, speaker Emmanuel Pratt will contextualize the historical degeneration vs. regeneration of The Commonwealth to present date, lead viewers on a virtual site visit, and share some upcoming developments emerging across a network of value-based partners.

    Speaker:
    Emmanuel Pratt, LF ‘17, received a BArch (1999) from Cornell University and an MSAUD (Master of Science in Architecture and Urban Design, 2003) from Columbia University. From 2011 to 2019, Pratt served as the director of aquaponics at Chicago...

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    2020 Sep 23

    Leaving New Orleans: A Personal Urban History

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online—Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard

    As the Beatrice Shepherd Blane Fellow, Leslie M. Harris is completing “Leaving New Orleans: A Personal Urban History.” She uses memoir and family, urban, and environmental histories to explore the multiple meanings of New Orleans in the nation, from its founding through its uncertain future amid climate change.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 21

    Kiley Fellow Lecture: Seth Denizen, "Thinking Through Soil: Case Study from the Mezquital Valley"

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Graduate School of Design

    Almost 200,000 acres of land in the fertile Mezquital Valley are irrigated with the untreated sewage of Mexico City. Every drop of rain, urban runoff, industrial effluent, and sewage in Mexico City is sent to the Mezquital Valley through a 60 kilometer pipe. Soils in this valley have been continuously irrigated with urban wastewater since 1901, longer than any other soil in the world. The capacity of these soils to produce conditions in which agriculture can be practiced safely and produce healthy crops depends on a complex negotiation between soil...

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    2020 Sep 16

    Exit, Voice, and ESG

    5:30pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Business School

    Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) may be the fastest-growing part of the investment landscape. Many investors care deeply about how to use the money they allocate in the markets to make a positive difference in the world. Caring is the crucial first step, but in this talk we consider what comes next: how can investors achieve the maximum possible per investment dollar? We argue that some of the most commonly-used approaches to ESG investing may do little,or even be counterproductive, and we suggest alternative ways to invest with impact.

    Faculty Host:...

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    2020 Sep 10

    Linda Shi, "Green Infrastructure Beyond Flood Risk Reduction"

    7:30pm to 9:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event, Graduate School of Design

    This lecture explores whether it is possible to achieve both social justice and environmental sustainability in efforts to mitigate urban flood risk. The expanding scale of urban flooding under climate change has renewed interest in large-scale restoration projects that make room for water in metro centers. However, ecologically functioning green infrastructure – unleashed rivers, sprawling wetlands – is inconsistent with the current governance landscape of fragmented local governments seeking to maximize local land values and minimize affordable housing. Moreover, even...

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    2020 Sep 08

    Why We Need More Than a Carbon Price

    9:00am to 10:00am

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center

    Although nearly all economists consider a carbon-pricing policy — either in the form of a carbon tax or a carbon emissions trading system — to be necessary to accomplish ambitious CO2 emissions reductions in large, complex economies, most such economists would also recognize such a carbon-pricing policy will not be sufficient. This is partly because of other market failures that get in the way of price signals, such as principal-agent problems and information spillovers of the results of research and development activities. Beyond this, there are significant political impediments to...

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    2020 Aug 19

    Using the Pandemic Recovery to Spur the Clean Transition

    9:00am to 10:00am

    Location: 

    Online—Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center

    In this webinar, Rachel Kyte (Dean, Fletcher School, Tufts University) will discuss a potential green recovery from the pandemic—how recovery efforts might be leveraged to accelerate the transition to a clean and sustainable energy system—in the United States and globally.

    Learn more about and RSVP for...

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    2020 Jul 09

    Europe's Green Recovery

    9:00am to 10:00am

    Location: 

    Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center—Online

    Mauro Petriccione (Director-General for Climate Action, European Commission) will discuss approaches to ensuring that Europe’s economic-recovery packages advance a green agenda—reduced greenhouse-gas emissions, reduced air and water pollution, and long-term sustainable development on the basis of a circular economy.

    Learn more about and RSVP for Europe's Green Recovery.

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    2020 Jun 17

    The Bridge: Natural Gas in a Redivided Europe

    12:30pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Three decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the breakup of the Soviet empire, the West faces a new era of East-West tensions. Any vision of a modern Russia integrated into the world economy and aligned in peaceful partnership with a reunited Europe has abruptly vanished. Two opposing narratives vie to explain the strategic future of Europe, one geopolitical and one economic, and both center on the same resource: natural gas. In The Bridge, Thane Gustafson, an expert on Russian oil and gas, argues that the political rivalries that capture the lions share of media attention...

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    2020 Feb 11

    What Makes Chocolate "Good?"

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    The social and environmental values underlying artisanal chocolate production have become increasingly important in its marketing. Good taste is paramount, of course, but how does one measure "social goodness," and what additional value does it add for the consumer? Chocolate makers’ interests often diverge from those of cacao producers, and industry stakeholders have not clearly addressed these concerns. Carla Martin will examine the cacao-chocolate industry and highlight the often conflicting goals that can create gaps in social and environmental responsibility.

    A...

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    2019 Dec 04

    Civilizing the Internet of Things

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge,

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deeply interconnected ecosystem of billions of devices and systems that are transforming commerce, science, and society. IoT technologies can be used to disrupt, exploit, bias, bully, and intrude as well as to make our lives safer, more efficient, and more convenient. Join Francine Berman, Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor in Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in an exploration of the larger social and environmental ecosystem needed to develop an IoT that maximizes benefits, minimizes risk, and promotes individual protections...

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    2019 Oct 30

    The Peril and Promise of Solar Geoengineering

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    Solar geoengineering research aims to reduce the impacts of global climate change. One possibility is to put aerosols into the stratosphere to alter Earth’s energy budget. This emerging technology entails risks and uncertainties, along with serious challenges to global governance. The greatest threat, perhaps, is that it will be used as a technical fix and encourage people to avoid the emissions cuts that are fundamental to curbing long-term climate risks.

    Lecturer David Keith will describe the simple physics underlying the climate’s response to stratospheric aerosols, the...

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