Events

    2022 Oct 16

    Flesh and Fabric: New Light on a Crucifixion by Pietro Lorenzetti

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, Menschel Hall, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    At the top of a painting of a Crucifixion by Pietro Lorenzetti (c. 1280–1348), an angel holds in one hand an unfurled scroll and in the other a bloody tunic. Never previously noted, let alone explained, this unique combination of motifs provides the key to understanding the panel’s unusual imagery. It sheds fresh light on the complex nexus between art, piety, and theology in 14th-century Italy, in particular at Assisi—the site of the mother house of the Franciscan order, where the panel most likely was made.

    This talk integrates the...

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    2022 Oct 12

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Lecture

    6:00pm to 7:30pm

    Location: 

    Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The inaugural Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Lecture at Harvard recognizes an individual who, through their activism, advocacy, scholarship, or service, has made an indelible contribution to advancing justice and equality.

    The 2022 lecture honors civil rights and education leader Freeman A. Hrabowski III, PhD, who will deliver a keynote speech on October 12.

    Widely acclaimed as one of the most transformative leaders in higher education, Dr. Hrabowski’s 30-year tenure as president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) received national...

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    2022 Oct 06

    "Mummy Portraits" of Roman Egypt: Status, Ethnicity, and Magic

    6:00pm to 7:15pm

    Location: 

    Online or In-Person at Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge

    In ancient Egypt, one of the final steps in the mummification process was to equip the body with a permanent face covering that helped protect the head and also ritually transform the deceased into a god. The earliest examples of these were stylized masks, later replaced by more realistically rendered painted portraits. Using evidence from the archaeological record and the Book of the Dead—a series of spells meant to guide the dead as they sought eternal life—art professor Lorelei Corcoran will discuss the production and function of the "mummy portraits" that were popular throughout...

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    2022 Oct 03

    Art, Aesthetics and Politics: In Conversation with T.M. Krishna

    6:00pm to 7:30pm

    Location: 

    CGIS South, Belfer Case Study Room S020, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

    What is the role of art in deeply unequal societies? Are aesthetics political? Can artists challenge dominant orders? Please join us for a conversation between eminent Carnatic vocalist and activist T.M. Krishna, social and cultural historian Shailaja Paik, lawyer and social critic Suraj Yengde, and jazz musician and scholar Vijay Iyer. The event will be moderated by Ajantha Subramanian, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies and Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Harvard University.

    ...

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    2022 Sep 29

    Reckoning with Echoes of the Past: A South African Story

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The repercussions of violent histories extend far beyond these events to engender repetitions that echo for generations. In this lecture, Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela will reflect on this problem and consider alternative ways of theorizing and making sense of the "transgenerational trauma" phenomenon, with the South African post-apartheid context as backdrop.

    Gobodo-Madikizela is a professor and research chair at Stellenbosch University. She holds the South African National Research Foundation Chair in Violent Histories and Transgenerational Trauma and is also the founding...

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    2022 Sep 22

    The History and Politics of Georgian Wine

    12:30pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies, 1730 Cambridge St., Room S354, Cambridge

    Georgia is the world's oldest wine producer, and the history of Georgian wine is woven together with the country's culture, politics, and economics. Join Mamuka Tsereteli for a lecture on the significance of Georgian wine, followed by a Q&A—and stick around for a tasting to find out for yourself why Georgian wine is so special!

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    2022 Sep 21

    Prejudice and Power: Stratification Economics, a General Theory of Intergroup Inequality

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    William Darity Jr. is the 2022–2023 Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and professor of public policy, African and African American studies, and economics at Duke University. In this lecture, Darity will explore the theoretical framework of stratification economics—a comparatively new subspecialty in the wider field of economics that seeks to explain intergroup inequality—along with its implications for the analysis of immigration, macroeconomic analysis, wealth disparities, educational inequalities, and discrimination.

    ...

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    2022 Sep 20

    Introduction to the History of Georgian Cinema

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    1737 Cambridge St., Room K262, Cambridge or Zoom Webinar

    In recent years, Georgian cinema has been witnessing an astonishing period of revival, a new generation of filmmakers has emerged, and today a new wave of Georgian filmmakers has managed to find a new and strong language of cinema, in order to speak with international audience about contemporary issues of Georgian society. Levan Lomjaria will explore these and other aspects of the history of Georgian cinema in his lecture.

    ...

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    2022 Jun 21

    Gallery Talk: A Sweeping Panorama—Simon de Vlieger’s View of Weesp

    12:00pm to 12:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Seventeenth-century artist Simon de Vlieger was one of many Dutch draftsmen who captured panoramas of the cities and towns that surrounded them. In his observed and accurate drawing of Weesp, a municipality located outside Amsterdam on the river Vecht, aspects of this recognizable view speak to larger questions of commerce and the environment. Join curatorial research associate Susan Anderson to discover these details within the broader artistic and cultural milieu of landscape drawing in the Dutch Republic.

    ...

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    2022 Jun 14

    Gallery Talk: Unpacking a 120-Year-Old Zeiss Photographic Microscope

    12:30pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Curator Sara Schechner, from Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, and Lynette Roth, curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum, will team up to explore a 120-year-old Zeiss photographic microscope. The curators will look at the assemblage of its various parts and share with visitors what they tell us about how scientists work with such a microscope. Its diverse components, housed in a wooden case, reveal not only the technical challenges of taking photographs through a microscope lens, but also the instrument’s inherent social, cultural, and aesthetic connections....

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    2022 Jun 08

    Gallery Talk: Drawing the Dutch Landscape, in Color

    12:30pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Seventeenth-century Dutch artists, such as Abraham Bloemaert, Hendrick Avercamp, and Albert Cuyp, achieved coloristic effects through a variety of means. Join curator Joachim Homann in an exploration of colorful papers, inks, and washes from artists of the Dutch Republic.

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    2022 Apr 27

    In-Person Gallery Talk: Ella Hurd’s Botanical Cyanotypes—Camera-less Photography and Scientific Discovery in the 19th Century

    12:30pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The talk will highlight amateur botanist Ella Hurd and the process she used to make her cyanotypes. It will also explore the importance of camera-less photography to scientific research and documentation in the 19th century.

    ...

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    2022 Apr 21

    In-Person Gallery Talk: Washington and the Power of Clothes

    12:30pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Join curator Horace D. Ballard for fresh perspective on two of the museums’ iconic portraits of George Washington through the meaning of gesture and the materialities of fashion. Inspired by Ballard’s recent research on Washington and his rewriting of the portraits’ gallery labels, the talk will explore the important role artists played in shaping the nation’s sense of self after the partisan politics of the Revolutionary War.

    ...

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    2022 Apr 14

    The Trouble with Tragedy: Imagining the Native American Past, Present, and Future

    6:00pm to 7:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    The Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP) and the Harvard Art Museums present a lecture by author David Treuer.

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe Indian, will offer a fresh and in-depth perspective on the current state of affairs for Native and Indigenous peoples in the Americas. Drawing from his experience growing up on the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and as an accomplished academic, Treuer’s work includes both nonfiction and fiction.

    ...

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    2022 Apr 13

    Spring 2022 George Parker Winship Lecture: "Documenting Indigenous Nations, War, and Peace"

    5:30pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Houghton Library, Quincy St. & Harvard St., Cambridge

    The Spring 2022 George Parker Winship Lecture at Houghton Library will be given by Scholars at Risk and Harvard Library Fellow Binalakshmi Nepram. In 1949, Manipur—a southeast Asian nation state with a 2,000-year history—was forcibly “merged” with India. Still under martial law today, the history and culture of its Indigenous inhabitants have been suppressed through decades of state-sanctioned violence. In her lecture, "Documenting Indigenous Nations, War, and Peace: Discovering and Preserving the Stories, Struggles, and History of Manipur, Northeast India," Nepram will discuss efforts...

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    2022 Apr 09

    In-Person Gallery Talk: Art and Human Health—An Evolutionary Perspective

    12:30pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Join Ben Sibson, a graduate student at Harvard in human evolutionary biology, for a conversation about how art can enhance our understanding of the evolution of human health. Looking at works of art installed in the University Study Gallery this semester for the undergraduate course Human Evolution and Human Health, Sibson will show how the objects provide useful information about the physical activities performed by people across time and space, as well as the foods they ate, the clothes they wore, and the spaces where they lived.

    ...

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    2020 Feb 27

    The New Geopolitical Order

    4:15pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden St., Cambridge

    The new geopolitical environment taking shape in many parts of the world tends toward increasing authoritarianism and nationalistic competition. In this lecture, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, an international human rights advocate and the former United Nations high commissioner for human rights, will argue that the world’s people deserve better. Despite the demagoguery and isolationism that some leaders are pursuing, he believes it is possible to pursue thoughtful diplomacy and a system of connectivity, coalitions, and partnerships to reform institutions and change polices.

    ...

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    2020 Jan 23

    Gallery Talk: Walk Like an Egyptian

    12:30pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge

    Fellow Jen Thum explores the basics of ancient Egyptian representation, including why their bodies seem to "walk like an Egyptian."

    Free with museum admission. Gallery talks are limited to 15 people and tickets are required. Ten minutes before each talk, tickets will become available at the admissions desk.

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    2019 Dec 11

    The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World’s Oldest Bible

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Chanan Tigay is an award-winning journalist and nonfiction writer who has covered the Middle East, 9/11, and the United Nations for such outlets as AFP, the Atlantic, GQ, and the New Yorker. In this lecture, Tigay will talk about his first book, The Lost Book of Moses: The Hunt for the World’s Oldest Bible, which tells the story of the oldest Bible in the world, how its outing as a fraud led to a scandalous death, and why archaeologists now believe it was real—if only they could find it. In addition to the story of this controversial Bible, Tigay will speak about his own hunt for the...

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