Events

    2021 Nov 09

    New Pathways to STEM: Increasing Access and Opportunity in Science Education

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard in the Community & LabXchange—Online

    Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, or STEM, has the power to inspire and the power to change the world. But those world-changing opportunities have not consistently reached enough of our learners, and the pathway to careers in STEM has not been fully accessible to all of the talented problem solvers the world needs. Now, with online learning and new digital tools rapidly advancing, educators, learners, job seekers, and industry professionals can help to expand access to STEM education and create a more inclusive and equitable STEM workforce by embracing these new tools,...

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    2021 Jun 10

    How We Incarcerate Young People: A Conversation about Policy and Neuroscience

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Across the United States, children under the age of 18 can be tried as adults in criminal court. Although the practice is condemned by international law, we are the only country in the world that sentences young people to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At the same time, recent developments in neuroscience research demonstrate that the human brain is not fully developed until after the age of 25.

    This program will consider the ways we punish young people in the American criminal legal system and how our policies could be reformed. We will bring together a...

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    2021 May 11

    Vaccine Equity and Efficacy in the United States and the World

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    As efforts to distribute COVID-19 vaccines intensify throughout the United States and across the globe, how can we ensure that equity and access are prioritized? This panel seeks to address the challenges and opportunities of equitable public health strategies around COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

    ...

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    2021 Apr 26

    Bark: Get to Know Your Trees

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Arnold Arboretum—Online

    Due to popular demand, we are offering another session of this free webinar. Led by naturalist and conservationist, Michael Wojtech, you'll learn to identify tree species by their bark and discover why such a variety of bark characteristics exist. Why do some species have smooth bark, while on others it is thick and broken? Why does bark peel? Join us to find out!

    Learn more about and RSVP for "Bark: Get...

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    2021 Feb 10

    Enduring Unethical Lessons from the Past: Learning from the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Medical School—Online

    The United States Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee is used as a case study of the exploitation of communities of color at the hands of medical professionals. What are the lessons learned and how far has medical ethics really come in terms of the treatment of Black and other communities of color? Lillie Head, president of Voices for Our Fathers Legacy Foundation, and Riggins R. Earl, Jr...

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    2020 Oct 15

    Astronauts: Women on the Final Frontier

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    The first person who will set foot on Mars is alive right now. We believe this, but even if we're wrong we know the first crew to arrive there will look nothing like the ones that landed on the Moon fifty years ago.

    Our world has changed for the better, and ASTRONAUTS tells the story of the women who built this better world. The main character and narrator is Mary Cleave, an astronaut you may not have heard of. It's not because so many people have been to space; only a few hundred have! It’s because this graphic novel isn’t about fame. No astronaut you'll ever meet took the...

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    2020 Oct 05

    Gutman Library Book Talk: Black, Brown, Bruised: How Racialized STEM Education Stifles Innovation

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Gutman Library—Online

    Drawing on narratives from hundreds of Black, Latinx, and Indigenous individuals, Ebony Omotola McGee examines the experiences of underrepresented racially minoritized students and faculty members who have succeeded in STEM. Based on this extensive research, McGee advocates for structural and institutional changes to address racial discrimination, stereotyping, and hostile environments in an effort to make the field more inclusive.

    ...

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    2020 Sep 17

    Observatory Night: What Stars Are Made Of

    7:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian—Online

    Join the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian for a virtual Public Observatory Night with guest lecturer Donavan Moore, author of "What Stars Are Made Of: The Life of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin."

    It was not easy being a woman of ambition in early twentieth-century England, much less one who wished to be a scientist. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin overcame prodigious obstacles to become a woman of many firsts: the first to receive a PhD in astronomy from Radcliffe College, the first promoted to full professor at Harvard, the first to head a department there. And, in what...

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    2020 May 21

    The President’s Innovation Challenge Awards Ceremony

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Do you want to discover the next generation of companies working to make the world better? We invite you and your community to join us for the 2020 President’s Innovation Challenge Awards Ceremony on May 21, which will be completely virtual for the first time in its history.

    Student and alumni teams from various Harvard schools have been working on their ventures all semester and are currently fine-tuning their pitches. At the Awards Ceremony, we’ll announce the $75,000 grand prize and $25,000 runner-up winner for each of the five tracks. Our new Executive Director Matt...

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    2019 Nov 06

    The Diffusion and Adoption of Welfare-Enhancing Innovations

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Todd Rogers is a behavioral scientist and professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Using his two decades of work in behavioral policy as a base, he will discuss his current research into what leads to welfare-enhancing innovations and practices. In particular, he aims to help scholars and practitioners design, identify, and invest in innovations that are likely to successfully scale.

    This event is free and open to the public. 

    ...

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    2018 Dec 09

    The Science of Pizza: It's a Little Cheesy!

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Science Center, Lecture Hall B, 1 Oxford St. Cambridge

    Why does pizza crust have holes? How does cheese form from milk? How do you break down food into the fuel your body needs? What makes pizza dough stretchy? Join us at the 2018 Harvard Holiday Science Lecture as we observe, touch, taste, and explore some of your favorite foods. Kids, families, students, teachers and the curious are welcome! You will discover the physics, chemistry and biology of cheese and bread, look at them under a microscope, make a simple cheese (yum!), and learn about digestion (yuck!). Using...

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    2018 Dec 09

    The Science of Pizza: It’s a Little Cheesy!

    11:00am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Science Center, Lecture Hall B, 1 Oxford St. Cambridge

    Why does pizza crust have holes? How does cheese form from milk? How do you break down food into the fuel your body needs? What makes pizza dough stretchy? Join us at the 2018 Harvard Holiday Science Lecture as we observe, touch, taste, and explore some of your favorite foods. Kids, families, students, teachers and the curious are welcome! You will discover the physics, chemistry and biology of cheese and bread, look at them under a microscope, make a simple cheese (yum!), and learn about digestion (yuck!). Using live experiments and interactive...

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    2018 Oct 28

    Fog x Kids: Family Drop In's: Engineering in the Fog

    2:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Hunnewell Building and Lawn, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    Engineering in the Fog --make your own glasses to create your up close and personal Fog for ages 8 and up.  One adult may bring a maximum of three children; age suitability listed above after dates. Meet on the Hunnewell Building lawn to the south of the building.  Free, drop in, no registration required.

    ...

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    2018 Oct 16

    Family Hike - Seeds with Wings

    2:00pm to 3:30pm

    Location: 

    Hunnewell Building, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

    Learn among the trees and discover the Arboretum on guided hikes for families. Seeds can fly. Find out which ones do and how they do it. One adult may bring a maximum of three children; suitable for children ages five through twelve. Meet in the Hunnewell Visitor Center.

    Free, drop in, no registration required.

    ...

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    2018 Sep 29

    Medicinal Plants at the Arnold Arboretum: An Exploration of the Wild and Cultivated Remedies Growing Beneath our Feet

    1:00pm to 2:30pm

    Location: 

    Hunnewell Building, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston

    Many plants that we consider to be weeds have rich ethnobotanical histories of their own that tie us closer to our environment. Your guides will explain how these "weedy" plants came to colonize this area while touching on cultural contexts and botanical identification of these wild species—as well as the cultivated medicinal species in the Leventritt Shrub and Vine Garden. Guides: John de la Parra, Associate, Harvard University Herbaria; Ernest Anemone, Co-Guide;...

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    2018 Sep 17

    Role of Clouds and Particles in Climate…with a Dash of Fog

    6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Location: 

    Hunnewell Building, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston

    Particles in our atmosphere, whether from the natural environment or from human-built engines, affect climate in ways we don’t yet fully understand. MIT Professor Dan Cziczo will speak of particles and clouds in our atmosphere and how climate is influenced by them. The evening will begin outdoors at Fog x Hill, a Fujiko Nakaya fog exhibit at the Arboretum and then shift indoors for a lecture about clouds and climate. Arrive promptly at 6:30pm to view Fog x Hill, a timed-release landscape...

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    2018 Sep 17

    Saving Coral Reefs in the Florida Keys

    6:00pm

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA

    James W. Porter, Josiah Meigs Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia

    Coral reefs support more than a quarter of all marine life, yet many are critically endangered. In the Florida Keys, the once common elk horn coral (Acropora palmata) has experienced steep declines since the 1970s. Preliminary blame was attributed to global warming and coral bleaching, but in fact, a human bacterial pathogen associated with a wide range of serious infections was the culprit. James Porter will discuss how Key West residents are saving these reefs...

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