Events

    2021 Nov 15

    Black Women and the American University: Eileen Southern's Story

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Join us for a one-hour webinar exploring the legacy of Eileen Southern, author of The Music of Black Americans: A History and founder and editor of The Black Perspective in Music. In 1976, Eileen Southern became the first African American woman tenured in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). Southern played an important institutional role at Harvard. She was central in developing the Department of Afro-American Studies (now African and African American Studies), serving as an early chair, and was on the faculty of the Department of Music, where she taught...

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    2021 Nov 08

    The Climate of Resistance

    7:00pm to 8:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    This conversation is part of the series "Weather Reports: The Climate of Now." The featured speakers are Chloe Aridjis, award-winning novelist, Sea Monsters (2020) and organizer for Writers Rebel, and Wanjira Mathai, Regional Director for Africa at the World Resources Institute.

    Activists Aridjis and Mathai are powerful, fierce, compassionate leaders in the global environmental movement. A writer and an organizer, they are also the daughters of iconic conservation heroes: Homero Aridjis,...

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    2021 Oct 20

    “We know and walk together”: Contemporary Indigenous Art in Brazil

    12:00pm to 1:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    This event will be held in Portuguese with simultaneous English translation.

    One of the most exciting developments in Brazilian art and art history today is the emergence of Indigenous self-representation. The growing presence of Indigenous artists and art curators in exhibitions and museums in the country challenges traditional narratives and modes of display as it generates new spaces for the silenced voices of the over three-hundred Indigenous ethnic groups that inhabit the territories of Brazil. In 2017, the Rio de Janeiro Museum (MAR) organized the exhibition...

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    2021 Oct 04

    The Climate of Relationships and Intersectionality

    7:00pm to 8:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School—Online

    This conversation is part of the series "Weather Reports: The Climate of Now." The featured speakers are climate activist Morgan Curtis, MDiv '24, and brontë velez, Black-latinx transdisciplinary artist.

    Morgan Curtis and brontë velez will discuss the intersectionality of race, class, gender, and climate collapse, and how seeing the world whole through the lens of relationships creates communities of care rather than conflict. They will consider what reparations might look like on behalf...

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    2021 Sep 23

    Inspired by the Harvard Museum of Natural History

    6:00pm to 7:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    The Harvard Museum of Natural History inspires college students and life-long learners to explore a myriad of scientific and creative pursuits. In this program, a group of professionals discuss how their experiences in the museum inspired their careers in science communication and storytelling, while they share images and videos of their favorite museum specimens and stories.

    Presented in collaboration with the Harvard University Chapter of Storywish, a student-run organization that empowers chronically ill children to read, write, and share their own...

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    2021 Sep 21

    The State of Democracy in Latin America

    12:00pm to 1:20pm

    Location: 

    David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard—Online

    Latin America has been buffeted by economic crisis, soaring crime rates, major corruption scandals, and a devastating pandemic. These crises have threatened democracies across much of the region. DRCLAS has assembled four prominent scholars of Latin American politics to evaluate the state of democracy in the region. How serious are contemporary threats to Latin American democracies? What are the prospects for their survival?

    ...

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    2021 Sep 21

    Anti-Racism in Public Health Policies, Practice, and Research

    10:00am to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    FXB Center for Health & Human Rights at Harvard University—Online

    On Tuesday, September 21, the FXB Center will host "Anti-Racism in Public Health Policies, Practice, and Research," a virtual symposium. One of the FXB Center’s latest core initiatives focuses on unpacking and addressing structural racism and health in the U.S. and other parts of the globe. The goal of the FXB Center is to deepen the knowledge base and fill gaps in content and methodology, while ensuring that research and evidence is responsive to community needs and informs policymaking.

    The symposium aims to launch this initiative and start a series of conversations and...

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    2021 Sep 14

    Inspiration, Empathy and Education: How Cultural Entities Are Helping People Think about Climate in New Ways

    8:30am to 10:00am

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History—Online

    As the world has sought to understand the causes and impacts of climate change, the topic has long been situated within the domain of science. In the 21st century, data, studies, reports, and academic/technical discourses have been the central mechanisms by which we learn about and process climate change: its consequences, our roles, and possible solutions. In recent years, however, artists and cultural institutions have developed a powerful interest in the topic and begun to employ myriad strategies by which to explore, draw attention to, and process it. There is an evolving...

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    2021 Aug 17

    Our Bodies, Ourselves Book Talk

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The final installment in the summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature a discussion of Our Bodies, Ourselves, first published in 1971. This event is organized in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the book’s first edition and in connection with the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective Records housed in the Schlesinger Library. The event will also include audience Q&A.

    ...

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    2021 Jul 27

    Book Talk with Daniel Carpenter

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The third installment of the Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Daniel Carpenter, author of Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790–1870 (Harvard University Press, 2021). Carpenter is the faculty director of the social sciences at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and the Allie S. Freed Professor of Government in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

    Carpenter's reading will be followed by a discussion with Nikki M. Taylor, professor of history and chair of the Department of History at Howard University. The event will also include an...

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    2021 Jul 20

    Book Talk with Tiya Miles

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The second installment of the Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Tiya Miles, author of All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley’s Sack, a Black Family Keepsake (Random House, 2021). Miles is a Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and a professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

    Miles's reading will be followed by a discussion with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and...

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    2021 Jul 13

    Book Talk with Clint Smith

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    The first installment in the summer series of Virtual Radcliffe Book Talks will feature Clint Smith, author of How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America (Little, Brown and Company, 2021) and staff writer at The Atlantic. Smith's reading will be followed by a discussion with Kyera Singleton, executive director of the Royall House and Slave Quarters, in Medford, Massachusetts. The event will also include audience Q and A.

    ...

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    2021 Jun 10

    How We Incarcerate Young People: A Conversation about Policy and Neuroscience

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Across the United States, children under the age of 18 can be tried as adults in criminal court. Although the practice is condemned by international law, we are the only country in the world that sentences young people to life in prison without the possibility of parole. At the same time, recent developments in neuroscience research demonstrate that the human brain is not fully developed until after the age of 25.

    This program will consider the ways we punish young people in the American criminal legal system and how our policies could be reformed. We will bring together a...

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    2021 Mar 16

    COVID-19 and the Law: The Health Care System in the Age of COVID-19

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    This seminar series will consider the ethical, legal, regulatory, and broader social and institutional impacts that COVID-19 has had, as well as the longer-lasting effects it may have on our society. This fifth seminar in the series will focus on how the health care system has reacted and evolved during the pandemic.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost all aspects of life in the United States and around the world, disrupting the global economy as well as countless institutions. The issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic present a critical juncture for the U.S. and other...

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    2021 Mar 08

    Lessons Learned from Anti-Equality Mobilization

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies—Online

    The 21st century Central European illiberal transformation is a process deeply reliant on gender politics. A feminist analysis is central to understanding the current regime changes, both in terms of their ideological underpinnings, and with respect to their modus operandi. Key aspects of this phenomenon are: 1. opposition to the liberal equality paradigm has become a key ideological space where the illiberal alternative to the post-1989 (neo)liberal project is being forged; 2. family mainstreaming and anti-gender policies have been one of the main pillars on which the illiberal state...

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    2020 Dec 08

    The Future of COVID-19 Epidemiology

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    To what extent is our future with COVID-19 knowable? As new information about the transmission, demographics, and treatment of COVID-19 emerge, epidemiologists continue to address complex data and generate new predictive models to better understand the dynamics of the virus. Join leading epidemiologists for a panel discussion as they assess the current and future state of the epidemic.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

    ...

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    2020 Dec 03

    2020 Visions

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Event

    Too often, the story of women’s suffrage unfolds in a vacuum, seemingly unconnected from the general contours of American history. This panel discussion looks back from the present, asking experts working in a variety of disciplines and organizations to briefly unfold, TED-talk style, a single “big idea” that captures the significance of the 19th Amendment for voting rights, citizenship, and democracy today.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

    ...

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    2020 Oct 29

    Education Justice: Why Prison Classrooms Matter

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    “What college does, it helps us learn about the nation,” said Rodney Spivey-Jones, a 2017 Bard College graduate currently incarcerated at Fishkill Correctional Facility in New York, in the docuseries College behind Bars. “It helps us become civic beings. It helps us understand that we have an interest in our community, that our community is a part of us and we are a part of it.”

    The Bard Prison Initiative and programs at other institutions of higher learning across the country have brought together teachers and learners in incarcerated spaces for years. This panel will gather...

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    2020 Oct 23

    Next in Water

    11:00am

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose creative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area. The speakers in this program will discuss water’s vital role across four areas of modern inquiry: biology, earth science, public health, and the search for extraterrestrial life.

    ...

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    2020 Oct 22

    New Blocs, New Maps, New Power

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    By the early 1980s, a new political landscape was taking shape that would fundamentally influence American society and politics in the decades to come. That year, the long-standing effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—championed by suffragist Alice Paul and introduced to Congress in 1923—ran aground, owing in significant measure to the activism of women who pioneered a new brand of conservatism.

    This panel will draw together strands and stories that are often kept separate: the ideas and growing influence of conservative women, the political activism of gay communities...

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