Events

    2022 Jun 26

    MassQ Ball 2022: Origin | Making of Ceremonial Vessels

    1:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Hemlock Hill and Conifer Collection, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston

    Led by Bengali culture worker Pampi, this audience participatory workshop allows attendees to weave love letters into hand-crafted ceremonial vessels for their loved ones. Vessels will be fashioned out of natural materials sourced from the Arboretum grounds and displayed in the MassQ Ball on July 9.

    Learn more and RSVP for this event.

    Read more about MassQ Ball 2022: Origin | Making of Ceremonial Vessels
    2022 May 21

    MassQ Ball 2022: Origin | Mythmaking Workshop

    3:00pm to 4:30pm

    Location: 

    Bradley Rosaceous Collection, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston

    Led by Castle of our Skins’ Director of Education Taylor Lena McTootle, “Making a Mythos” focuses on the creative power of storytelling. Young participants will experience firsthand how fictional tales can reflect our cultural values and create them.

    Appropriate for youth ages 8-12 years old.

    Learn more and register.

    Read more about MassQ Ball 2022: Origin | Mythmaking Workshop
    2022 Mar 27

    Amazing Archaeology Fair at Harvard

    1:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Ave. & Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, 6 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

    Special In-Person Family Event! Free with Museum Admission; Admissions Reservation Required.

    Experience an epic day of archaeological events with the family! Activities are scattered across two museums so explore Native North American, Central American, Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Mediterranean archaeology. Throw a spear with a spear thrower. Talk to student archaeologists who excavate in locations around the world.

    ...

    Read more about Amazing Archaeology Fair at Harvard
    2022 Feb 15

    Lakefront: Public Trust and Private Rights in Chicago

    12:30pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    How did Chicago, a city known for commerce, come to have such a splendid public waterfront—its most treasured asset? The book’s authors study the lakefront’s evolution from the middle of the nineteenth century to the twenty-first. Their findings have significance for understanding not only Chicago’s history but also the law’s part in determining the future of significant urban resources such as waterfronts.

    Join us for a discussion on Lakefront: Public Trust and Private Rights in Chicago with authors Joseph Kearney and Thomas Merrill and panelists Henry Smith, Richard...

    Read more about Lakefront: Public Trust and Private Rights in Chicago
    2022 Feb 04

    Patricia Sullivan, 'Justice Rising: Robert Kennedy’s America in Black and White'

    1:00pm

    Location: 

    Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard—Online

    Former Hutchins Center Fellows discuss their recent works in. the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Alumni Fellows Virtual Reading Series.

    Patricia Sullivan, Professor of History, University of South Carolina, in conversation with Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School.

    Learn more and register for this virtual event.

    ... Read more about Patricia Sullivan, 'Justice Rising: Robert Kennedy’s America in Black and White'
    2021 Nov 19

    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 3)

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    The new genre of interior painting enjoyed great popularity among 17th-century Dutch citizens. Its indoor scenes featuring people involved in mundane activities resemble the domestic settings in which they were hung. Other art forms such as perspective boxes and dollhouses further reinforce the link connecting physical, pictorial, and mental space by relating home to the interiority of the individual.

    ...

    Read more about Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 3)
    2021 Nov 18

    Reconstructing Queen Amanishakheto’s Musical Instruments

    6:00pm to 7:15pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    Double reed pipes, known as auloi, were popular musical instruments in the ancient Mediterranean. In 1921, archaeologists exploring the necropolis of Meroë (northern Sudan)—as part of the Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition—found a large collection of auloi in the pyramid of Nubian Queen Amanishakheto. Susanne Gänsicke will discuss the discovery’s importance and what it reveals about the connections between Nubia and the Mediterranean world as well as the significance of far-reaching musical traditions. She will also share recent efforts to conserve...

    Read more about Reconstructing Queen Amanishakheto’s Musical Instruments
    2021 Nov 17

    Useful Objects: Nineteenth-Century Museums and American Culture

    4:30pm to 5:45pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Museums of Science & Culture—Online

    What can the history of museums tell us about their role in American culture today? What kinds of objects were considered worth collecting, and who decided their value? Join Reed Gochberg, author of Useful Objects: Museums, Science, and Literature in Nineteenth-Century America (Oxford University Press, September 2021) to learn about the early history of American museums, including Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology. In conversation with HMSC...

    Read more about Useful Objects: Nineteenth-Century Museums and American Culture
    2021 Nov 17

    Indian Collectibles: Appropriations and Resistance in the Haudenosaunee Homelands

    12:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Scott Manning Stevens is an associate professor and director of Native American and Indigenous Studies at Syracuse University. In this lecture, he will discuss his new project, which focuses on ways Indigenous communities can confront cultural alienation and appropriation in museums, galleries, and archives.

    Learn more about and RSVP for this virtual event....

    Read more about Indian Collectibles: Appropriations and Resistance in the Haudenosaunee Homelands
    2021 Nov 15

    Black Women and the American University: Eileen Southern's Story

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Radcliffe Institute—Online

    Join us for a one-hour webinar exploring the legacy of Eileen Southern, author of The Music of Black Americans: A History and founder and editor of The Black Perspective in Music. In 1976, Eileen Southern became the first African American woman tenured in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). Southern played an important institutional role at Harvard. She was central in developing the Department of Afro-American Studies (now African and African American Studies), serving as an early chair, and was on the faculty of the Department of Music, where she taught...

    Read more about Black Women and the American University: Eileen Southern's Story
    2021 Nov 15

    Black Women and the American University: Eileen Southern’s Story

    4:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Education—Online

    Join us for a one-hour webinar exploring the legacy of Eileen Southern, author of “The Music of Black Americans: A History” and founder and editor of “The Black Perspective in Music.”

    In 1976, Eileen Southern (1920–2002) became the first African American woman tenured in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). She was central in developing...

    Read more about Black Women and the American University: Eileen Southern’s Story
    2021 Nov 13

    Harvard Dance Center Showing: Initiation – In Love Solidarity

    4:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Dance Center—Online or in-person

    Initiation – In Love Solidarity is a choreographic narrative exploring the embodiment of the Middle Passage, and the resilience and evolving identities of women in the African diaspora. A film component of the work was created at historic sites in New England related to the transatlantic slave trade and emancipation. The imagery of the cowrie shell is present throughout, chosen as an emblem of the transformative identity of the Black female body.

    Saturday, November 13, 4pm & 7pm: ...

    Read more about Harvard Dance Center Showing: Initiation – In Love Solidarity
    2021 Nov 12

    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 2)

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    Arts and sciences flourished in the Dutch Republic during the 17th century. Women such as Anna Maria van Schurman, Margareta van Godewick, and Anna Roemer Visscher excelled in scholarly pursuits and art practice. They were greatly admired, but they were nonetheless categorized as exceptional cases and never possessed the freedom to voice ideas enjoyed by their male counterparts. Working in a variety of art forms, including miniature painting, drawing, embroidery, and paper cutting, these women often meant to address no other audience than the artist herself.

    ...

    Read more about Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 2)
    2021 Nov 05

    Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 1)

    4:00pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Art Museums—Online

    In the 17th century, the Dutch Republic was a fast-paced, successful, modern society—economically, politically, and artistically. The work ethic of its citizens amazed foreign visitors, who compared the Dutch to crawling ants. Its flourishing art production showed the bustle of everyday life with almost scientific precision. Yet many artworks amassed by Dutch citizens in their homes portray scenes of silence and serenity. Such works, including genre pieces by Johannes Vermeer and still lifes featuring fruit, nuts or bread by Willem Heda and Adriaen Coorte, suggest a deep engagement with...

    Read more about Art and Thought in the Dutch Republic: Erasmus Lectures on the History and Civilization of the Netherlands and Flanders (Part 1)
    2021 Apr 16

    Resetting the Table: A Virtual Talk and Tour with the Curators

    2:00pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Food Literacy Project—Online

    The "Resetting the Table: Food and Our Changing Tastes" exhibition at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology explores food choices and eating habits in the United States, including the sometimes hidden but always important ways in which our tables are shaped by cultural, historical, political, and technological influences.

    Join us on this special virtual talk and tour at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology with Joyce Chapli, guest curator and Harvard University James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History; Janis Sacco, Director...

    Read more about Resetting the Table: A Virtual Talk and Tour with the Curators
    2021 Apr 09

    Gender Rights in the Time of Pandemic

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard—Online

    This session will consider what it means to organize for gender rights in global contexts in the 21st century during a pandemic. The speakers will feature diverse geographic and disciplinary perspectives, addressing key issues related to gendered power and difference in Africa, South Asia, and among minoritized people in the United States, including the gendered nature of care labor, rights-based activism in the face of rising global authoritarianisms, and the transnational reach of global protest.

    ...

    Read more about Gender Rights in the Time of Pandemic
    2021 Apr 07

    Recovering the Histories of Seven Enslaved Americans

    6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology—Online

    For seven seasons, award-winning Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. has uncovered the ancestral stories of celebrity guests on his hit-television series, Finding Your Roots. In this program, Gates will be joined by Dr. Gregg Hecimovich to discuss the process of unearthing the histories of formerly enslaved people. The focus will be on  Alfred, Delia, Drana, Fassena, Jack, Jim, and Renty, seven Black men and women who were photographed against their will in Columbia, South Carolina in 1850. These controversial photographs are the subject of a new book, To Make Their Own...

    Read more about Recovering the Histories of Seven Enslaved Americans
    2021 Mar 11

    Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem (Film Screening and Panel Discussion)

    3:30pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School—Online

    Join the Harvard Law School Library for a live screening and panel discussion of “Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem,” a new documentary about the racial history and modern discrimination of the American misdemeanor system. The film, produced by Brave New Films and directed by Robert Greenwald, was inspired by HLS Professor Alexandra Natapoff’s book, “Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal.”

    ...

    Read more about Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem (Film Screening and Panel Discussion)

Pages