Made in Allston celebrates local artists

December 12, 2016 at 10:30 am
Recent exhibit at the Harvard Ed Portal celebrated local artists. Artists featured include Heather Dawson, Rachel Eng, Halstead Harris, Heather Kapplow, Jack Mauch, Yoko Miyaji, Mitch Ryerson, Charles Talbot, Gideon Weisz, and Seth Wiseman.

Made in Allston: The Sculptor’s Workshop, an exhibition in the Harvard Ed Portal Crossings Gallery, celebrated 10 artists who work in a collaborative space on Franklin Street in north Allston-Brighton. The exhibition marked the first joint show with Gallery 224, located next door at the Ceramics Program, Office for the Arts at Harvard.

“Speaking from a program that is invested in teaching and respecting craftsmanship, the work presented in the exhibition exemplified the importance of cultivating a culture of makers,” said Kathy King, the Director of Education at the Ceramics Program. “Many of the materials used – wood, metals, clay, fiber – are materials that require the connection of the hand and mind and many of the works in the exhibition represented countless hours of work.”

Artists Heather Dawson, Rachel Eng, Halstead Harris, Heather Kapplow, Jack Mauch, Yoko Miyaji, Mitch Ryerson, Charles Talbot, Gideon Weisz, and Seth Wiseman work alongside each other in The Sculptor’s Workshop, a site originally acquired by the late sculptor Bill Wainwright. Nearly 200 people attended a reception on November 12 celebrating both the exhibition and the 30th anniversary of Allston Open Studios.

Artist Kapplow was inspired by Ryerson—a local craftsman specializing in wood structures and furniture—while working alongside him in The Sculptor’s Workshop. Her piece helped transport gallery visitors to his workshop through its wood shavings on the ground and a video projected overhead.

“Creating a portrait of Mitch's space and work gave me an opportunity to get to know him a little more intimately,” she said. Kapplow further elaborated on the challenge in transforming Ryerson’s workshop into an exhibition piece. “I got to almost ritually respond to the complexity of ‘placemaking’ by representing a place in which the main function is placemaking,” she said.

Visit edportal.harvard.edu to learn more about upcoming events, programs, and exhibitions.